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Old May 23rd, 2012, 07:33 PM   #6801
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Looks excellent.
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Old May 24th, 2012, 12:18 PM   #6802
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The view from the observatory of the Tokyo Sky Tree

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wg2gD...5&feature=plcp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_ToU...4&feature=plcp

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXL7a...3&feature=plcp
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Old May 24th, 2012, 12:27 PM   #6803
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Amazing! I wish i can visit it one day!...the best looking tower
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Old May 24th, 2012, 02:02 PM   #6804
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Thank you Verzeda for the video links. It looks amazing from the inside as well.
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Old May 24th, 2012, 06:12 PM   #6805
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Does Tokyo SkyTree have the diagram inside where it compares other city's tall towers too?
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Old May 24th, 2012, 06:36 PM   #6806
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[/INDENT]
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Old May 24th, 2012, 06:36 PM   #6807
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Hi,
Do you have information about elevator system here?
Thanks
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Old May 24th, 2012, 06:45 PM   #6808
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Tokyo Skytree opens to public


The Yomiuri Shimbun


[IMG]http://i46.************/9sqaer.jpg[/IMG]
Visitors take pictures from the base of the tower on Tuesday morning.

[IMG]http://i46.************/ak90dw.jpg[/IMG]



Tokyo Skytree, the tallest tower in the world, opened to the public Tuesday.

Tokyo's new landmark in Sumida Ward opened after construction began three years and 10 months ago, finishing with a height of 634 meters, and surviving the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11 last year.

The tower did not suffer any damage from the disaster and became a symbol of hope to many Japanese people, including survivors in the devastated areas throughout Tohoku.

Tokyo Skytree will become the new broadcasting tower for transmitting television and radio waves, taking over from the 333-meter-high Tokyo Tower, which was constructed during the nation's period of rapid economic growth.

A commercial complex at the foot of the tower, Tokyo Solamachi, also opened Tuesday. The flow of people within the capital is expected to change due to the tower and the complex, which are expected to draw huge crowds near the heart of Tokyo. They are also expected to help Japan attract more overseas tourists.

The first visitor to reach the 350-meter observation deck on the opening day was Ayumi Nakazawa of Saitama Prefecture, who was chosen from among 32,699 people who voted for "Tokyo Skytree" when a nationwide poll was conducted in 2008 to decide the tower's name.

The 42-year-old company employee and her son Kenta, 12, a first-year middle school student, arrived at the deck at about 10:50 a.m.

Although drizzle caused poor visibility from the deck, "I was impressed that I could see the ground," Nakazawa said. "All I can say is I felt happy."

Nakazawa was followed by baseball legend Sadaharu Oh, chairman of the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks. He was born in Sumida Ward and attended Narihira Primary School near the tower.

"I went to that school," 72-year-old Oh said as he looked from the deck. "I feel as if I've gone back through time."

About 8,000 people, who won admission tickets at odds of up to 335-to-1, went up to the observation deck on the opening day.

During an opening ceremony starting just after 9 a.m. ahead of the official opening, Yoshizumi Nezu, president of Tobu Railway Co., the parent company of the tower's operator, described the day's rain as "a rain of blessing."

"It's unfortunate to have weather like this, but it's blessed rain for Skytree to grow," Nezu, 60, said in his greeting speech. "I believe we have a promising start today."

Tokyo Solamachi has been designed in the hope of creating a "new shitamachi," a term describing a low-lying part of eastern downtown Tokyo.

The complex, which features more than 300 shops and restaurants, opened at 9:40 a.m., 20 minutes earlier than the scheduled time because so many people were waiting.

Skytree and Solamachi are likely to rank among the nation's biggest tourist attractions, with Tobu Railway estimating 32 million visitors to the area each year, 7 million more than the number who go to Tokyo Disney Resort in Chiba Prefecture.

The Sumida Ward Office estimates the economic effect of the facilities for Tokyo will be 130 billion yen a year, thanks to the tower's location, which is just five kilometers from JR Tokyo Station.

Construction of Tokyo Skytree started on July 14, 2008, and the tower reached its full height on March 18 last year. It was completed on Feb. 29, about two months later than scheduled due to the 2011 disaster.

===

Tickets sold out until July 10

Tokyo Skytree observation decks can only be visited by reservation until July 10 and individual admission tickets are almost completely sold out. Sales of nonreserved tickets will begin on July 11.

Tickets for the tower's No. 1 observation deck, 350 meters above ground, are priced at 2,500 yen for people aged 18 and older and at 2,000 yen for middle and high school students. Nonreserved tickets are 500 yen more than reserved tickets.

If visitors go up to the tower's No. 2 observation deck, 450 meters from the ground, there is an additional charge of 1,000 yen for people 18 and older and 800 yen for middle and high school students.

(May. 23, 2012)
Link: http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120522005635.htm
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:21 PM   #6809
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Tokyo Hair Tree

[IMG]http://i46.************/2mcbrqr.jpg[/IMG]

REUTERS

A man with a hairstyle featuring the Tokyo Sky Tree, waits to enter the tower on Tuesday.
Link: http://www.japantoday.com/category/p...ews_on_twitter
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:26 PM   #6810
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From Japan Times, the Skytree Storify in photos, tweets and video, including a 0--634-meter construction timelapse.
http://storify.com/japantimes/tokyo-...e=embed_header
(lots of the images are new to this thread)
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:33 PM   #6811
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elevonic View Post
Hi,
Do you have information about elevator system here?
Thanks
Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corp. manufactured the high-speed elevator that takes visitors to the first observation deck at 350 meters in a mere 50 seconds or so. Ascending and descending at 36 kph is about 10 times faster than elevators ordinarily used in condominiums, making it the fastest now in use in Japan for those that can carry 40 people or a similarly large number.

A key concern was ensuring a comfortable ride by reducing shaking as the elevator whizzes up and down. This was partly achieved by keeping the difference at the joints of the rails used by the elevator to under 0.001 millimeter, or, as a company official said, "almost zero."
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:40 PM   #6812
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...the elevator info is from this interesting Asahi Shimbun post made on opening day of Tokyo Sky Tree:
Next step: Spinning off technology used to create Tokyo Sky Tree

[IMG]http://i47.************/kckl5.jpg[/IMG]

May 22, 2012

Tokyo Sky Tree, which at 634 meters is the world's tallest free-standing tower, is a marvel of new technologies and design approaches.

As such, the companies that are responsible for this stunning structure in the capital's Sumida Ward are hoping to capitalize on their innovations to create business opportunities.

The Tokyo Sky Tree not only boasts cutting-edge structural technology to protect it against earthquakes and super-strong winds, but also state-of-the-art touches to impress even the most jaded visitor.

Its primary mission is as a transmission tower for digital terrestrial broadcasting, but observation decks offering panoramic views of the city, as well as a restaurant and cafes, combine to make it one of Tokyo's premier attractions.

Shopping malls, more restaurants, an aquarium and a planetarium are located at the base.

A central feature of the tower, which opened to the public May 22, is a system to control swaying. The technology, used for the first time, has been dubbed "shinbashira" after the central pillar found in traditional five-story pagodas.

The technology was developed by Nikken Sekkei Ltd. and Obayashi Corp.
The 375-meter-long, steel-reinforced concrete shinbashira is not directly connected to the tower itself and is designed to cancel out the swaying of the needle-like tower during an earthquake.

According to an official with Nikken Sekkei, which designed the structure, the concept was developed on the basis that pagodas rarely topple during earthquakes.

In addition to controlling swaying, the interior of the shinbashira at the Tokyo Sky Tree contains an emergency stairwell.
Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corp. manufactured the high-speed elevator that takes visitors to the first observation deck at 350 meters in a mere 50 seconds or so. Ascending and descending at 36 kph is about 10 times faster than elevators ordinarily used in condominiums, making it the fastest now in use in Japan for those that can carry 40 people or a similarly large number.

A key concern was ensuring a comfortable ride by reducing shaking as the elevator whizzes up and down. This was partly achieved by keeping the difference at the joints of the rails used by the elevator to under 0.001 millimeter, or, as a company official said, "almost zero."

Wind resistance was also reduced by setting the upper and lower covering at a slight angle.

Officials of the companies involved in the creation of the Tokyo Sky Tree expect the technologies developed especially for the project to translate into greater sales and profits.

"If a similar transmission tower was to be built, the technology could likely be applied anywhere in the world," said an official with Nikken Sekkei, referring to the shinbashira technology.

Hitachi Cable Ltd. provided the antenna tower that holds digital terrestrial broadcasting antennas and is positioned from about 500 meters above ground.

"It is a huge achievement to install an antenna at such a height and capable of withstanding strong winds," said a company official. "It will be an advantage for us as we seek out new orders in the future."

A streamlined antenna was designed to allow it to be able to withstand maximum winds of 396 kph that could strike once in about 1,300 years.
Some 40,000 tons of super-reinforced steel, with the largest amount supplied by JFE Steel Corp., was used in the tower's construction.

"The most advanced technology in the world was used to build the tower," a JFE Steel official noted.

But that is not necessarily a blessing.

"We have not yet obtained an order for a similar level (of steel) because the specifications were so exacting," the official said.

An official with Nippon Steel Corp. said, "We had anticipated receiving orders from Dubai, where there are many tower construction projects, but so far we have not yet received any."
Link: http://ajw.asahi.com/article/economy...AJ201205220066
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:43 PM   #6813
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Bad manners worry residents near Tokyo Sky Tree as opening nears

Illegal parking, litter, and loud noises are causes of concern for residents and authorities of Tokyo's Sumida Ward, home to the soon-to-open Tokyo Sky Tree.

The broadcast tower, which is located in the middle of a residential area within the ward, is expected to attract some 200,000 visitors on holidays after its grand opening on May 22.

In a bid to protect the area from the already apparent poor etiquette, as well as prevent similar outbreaks in the future, the Metropolitan Police Department and the Sumida Ward Office have begun pushing forward counter-plans, ahead of the tower's official opening date.

When Tokyo Sky Tree was lit up for an event on May 6, lines of illegally parked cars flooded the Kototoi Bridge over the Sumida River. The sidewalk on the Azuma Bridge nearby, meanwhile, became so packed with people that at some point police had to intervene.

Illegal parking in areas close to the tower has been increasing on weekdays as well.

In January this year, Sumida Ward's Honjo Police Station designated the 500-meter-radius zone around the tower as a strongly monitored area against illegal parking. Since there are parking spaces for only 918 cars at Tokyo Sky Tree Town, the commercial area surrounding the tower, and 453 vehicles at nearby parking lots, the Metropolitan Police Department fears that cars parked in residential areas or along roadsides will increase.

While it is currently prohibited to park along the ward's roads near the tower primarily between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m., the department plans to completely ban parking along such roads beginning as early as this June.

"Since we can't predict to what extent traffic will increase after the opening of the tower, all we can do is act according to the circumstances," an official with the department says.

A road, located along the Sumida River about 50 meters south of Tokyo Sky Tree, has been gathering popularity as "the closest place to the Tree" while construction work on the tower continued.

To avoid disorder, the road was designed as a one-way street in March last year. However, the Sumida Ward Office is continuously receiving a number of complaints, saying that youngsters gather there at night, and litter, including empty cans and plastic food containers, is scattered near garbage collection points.

In April this year, the ward office began dispatching guardsmen to watch over the area, in addition to employing 10 workers to pick up left-over garbage in places near the tower where visitors tend to gather most.

An official with the ward's safety support division are calling for proper behavior, saying, "Please have good manners so that everybody can enjoy the area."

May 19, 2012 (Mainichi Japan)
Link: http://mainichi.jp/english/english/n...na005000c.html
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Old May 24th, 2012, 07:55 PM   #6814
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lots more on Tokyo Sky Tree elevators and technology from Japan Times:
[IMG]http://i50.************/160qtr8.jpg[/IMG]
Top plan: This diagrammatic cross section (above) shows the shock-absorbers around the central column. NIKKEN SEKKAI

[IMG]http://i48.************/rwjdkl.jpg[/IMG]
Towering achievement: From ground level to 125 meters up, the 634-meter-high Tokyo Sky Tree features a central pillar fixed with beams to the steel-truss structure. Then, from 125 to 375 meters, the central column steadies the structure through the shock-absorbing function of oil dampers. NIKKEN SEKKAI

The sky's the limit

By BRETT BULL
Special to The Japan Times

After the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11 last year, the performance of the spectacularly tall Tokyo Sky Tree going up in the capital's downtown Sumida Ward became a subject of heightened interest to experts, residents and the general public alike.


Built to last: The steel truss exterior of the 41,000-ton Sky Tree tapers from its triangular footprint to a cylinder surrounding the central concrete column that houses an emergency staircase of 2,523 steps. BRETT BULL
Tobu Tower Sky Tree, the corporate owner of the project, reported that no structural damage resulted from the magnitude-9 temblor, whose epicenter was some 350 km to the north off the Pacific coast of Miyagi Prefecture.

Credit for this accomplishment can in part be attributed to temples all the way down in the ancient capital of Kyoto.

To the casual observer, the steel truss exterior of the 41,000-ton Sky Tree appears to gradually taper from its triangular footprint upward to a cylindrical spire pinnacling at 634 meters. Mostly unseen from the outside, however, is an internal reinforced-concrete column.

"The central column is like those used in the five-story pagodas of traditional Japanese architecture," says Tadano Kamei, a senior architect at architectural firm Nikken Sekkei, which was commissioned for the design work. "The outer frame and central pillar are structurally separate."

In the event of an earthquake, the upper part of the core column is designed to function as "a balancing weight," such that when the inner and outer components begin shaking, their relative motions are out of step and oppose one another. A "viscous damping system" similar to shock absorbers, and positioned at various points between the two, dissipates the seismic energy and lessens the swaying. The result is a 50 percent reduction in the structure's overall movement.


Towering achievement: From ground level to 125 meters up, the 634-meter-high Tokyo Sky Tree features a central pillar fixed with beams to the steel-truss structure. Then, from 125 to 375 meters, the central column steadies the structure through the shock-absorbing function of oil dampers. NIKKEN SEKKAI
Nikken Sekkei claims that not one temple in Japan that utilizes this design concept, known as shimbashira seishin (central column vibration control), has collapsed due to seismic forces.

The arrangement is just one of many special architectural and design features of this record-setting radio and television transmission tower that's scheduled to open to visitors on May 22.

Built by construction company Obayashi, the Sky Tree is the second-tallest structure in the world after the 828-meter Burj Khalifa in Dubai. Last November, Guinness World Records recognized it as the world's tallest freestanding broadcast structure.

For tourists looking to get a bird's-eye view of the metropolis, two observation decks are positioned at 350 and 450 meters from the ground. High-speed elevators, rolling outside the concrete core that houses an emergency staircase of 2,523 steps, zoom up to the lower platform in 50 seconds, and reach the next deck a half-minute later.

Kamei says that the intention from the start, in February 2005, was to create a structure that "transcends time and space" through a design that allows the tower to function not only as a transmitter and an observatory, "but also an everlasting symbol of Tokyo."

Such a lofty goal got started with the lofting of balloons. Nikken Sekkei's team floated 50 from the site to ascertain wind patterns at increasing altitudes.

The company had previously designed many tall towers, including, under the direction of Waseda University's Tachu Naito, the 333-meter-tall Tokyo Tower, which was completed in 1958.

Tokyo Tower, the current transmitter of TV signals for the city, which will still be in use until 2013, was built to withstand a wind speed of 90 meters per second at its top. However, Tokyo Sky Tree, which will begin transmitting six channels in January next year, and another one in April, is nearly twice as high as Tokyo Tower — a crucial factor considering that wind speed is generally higher the greater the altitude. "Understanding patterns over the site was essential in preparing a wind-resistant design for this tower," says Kamei.

Numerous computer analyses were performed. Kamei says that though the structure appears simple, three-dimensional simulations utilized approximately 700,000 data points.

To mitigate winds at the top, a "tuned-mass damping" system has been installed. In practice, this translates into two massive ballast weights, one 25 tons and the other 40 tons, that were supplied by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and suspended near the top with large springs and dampers. Similar to the concept employed with the concrete core and outer truss frame below, these two counterweights work to offset lateral movement.

"They are the largest springs we've fabricated," Yoshiki Watanabe, president of Osaka-based Tokaibane Manufacturing, told weekly tabloid Josei Seven (May 10-17). The colossal coils weigh one ton each and measure 8 cm in diameter.

Back on terra firma, the tower's foundation is "anchored to the ground like a giant tree," as the Nikken Sekkei website explains. Sets of cylindrical steel and thin-walled concrete piles extend up to 50 meters beneath the surface in an arrangement similar to the spikes on golf or athletics shoes.


Top plan: This diagrammatic cross section (above) shows the shock-absorbers around the central column. NIKKEN SEKKAI
All told, the criteria for ensuring safety from a natural disaster is impressive. The tower has been built to withstand a magnitude 6.9 earthquake sourced from a presently unknown fault directly beneath it; while Tokaibane's Watanabe says his company was also required to take into account Typhoon Muroto, which struck the Kansai region of western Japan on Sept. 21, 1934, with powerful winds that killed more than 2,700 people.

Videos on YouTube shot from 2:46 p.m. on March 11 last year — the moment the Great East Japan Earthquake began — show the then 625-meter tower swaying, with one of its tall cranes used in the construction process swinging violently close to its topmost point.

Shigeaki Tabuchi, site director for Obayashi, has since been quoted in the media saying that the top of the tower was displaced by between 4 and 6 meters during the March 11 quake. Yet the only substantial problem for the project was a two-month hiatus in the construction schedule due to delayed material deliveries brought about by disaster-related supply-chain problems.

Of the Sky Tree's appearance, considerable attention was paid to creating a "lightness of volume" to reduce the amount of steel required and any feeling of oppressiveness to the eyes of local residents. Consequently, the high-strength steel pipes welded vertically, horizontally and diagonally that compose the visible external truss network combine engineered strength with a pleasing, unweighty wickerwork aesthetic.

As well, Kamei points out that a structure in which a triangular cross-section at the base transitions into a circle higher up exists nowhere else in the world. Here, though, it is a feature born of necessity, due to the constraints of the site.

Commenting on this, Kamei observes, "Sometimes, unique designs are not rational from a structural viewpoint, but a tower exceeding 600 meters in height has to be structurally rational if we take into account the budget" — which as of the latest data available, for 2010, was ¥59.6 billion.

Tokyo Tower presently is the symbolic king of the skyline, with a design and appearance from near or far that has provided inspiration for books and films.

However, Kamei envisions that future generations will accord the Sky Tree an appreciation not unlike that for the pyramids of Giza, the towers of San Gimignano in Italy or the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri. "I think people tend to preserve monuments which have original shapes and characteristics," the architect says.

The Sky Tree has, though, already proved to be a facilitator of dreams. In February, the construction company Obayashi, motivated by its work on the project, unveiled plans to build a "space elevator" by the year 2050. Such a contraption, first conceived in the 19th century, would send an elevator compartment traveling along the outside of a heavy-duty carbon-fiber cable, much like a beanstalk, extended from Earth into space.

Yoshio Aoki, a professor in the department of precision machinery engineering at Tokyo-based Nihon University, who is the director of the Japan Space Elevator Association, sees the Sky Tree as a test case for propelling a manned elevator to the stars.

"For elevators in high towers, like the Sky Tree, the hoist ways are not wrapped by walls," says the professor of what would be the ultimate pie, or castle, in the sky. "This is the same as a space elevator."

Aoki says that if the elevators in the Sky Tree — which are in glass-enclosed shafts on the outside of the inner core — can endure wind, rain and other elements, and can function continuously, then the concept can be applied to a space elevator.

"That will be the proof we need," he says.

So, for the "Son of Sky Tree," it seems, the sky really may not be the limit.

Brett Bull is editor in chief of The Tokyo Reporter, at www.tokyoreporter.com.
Link: http://www.japantimes.co.jp/text/fl20120520x1.html
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Old May 24th, 2012, 08:19 PM   #6815
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Amazing. Congratulation Japan you did it.
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Old May 24th, 2012, 10:11 PM   #6816
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So nice to finally see TST open.

The construction process was an amazing journey. Will miss that.
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Old May 25th, 2012, 01:58 AM   #6817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zumen View Post
From Japan Times, the Skytree Storify in photos, tweets and video, including a 0--634-meter construction timelapse.
http://storify.com/japantimes/tokyo-...e=embed_header
(lots of the images are new to this thread)
Thanks for all your contributions, Zumen. The thread needed some life yesterday
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Old May 25th, 2012, 02:43 AM   #6818
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zumen View Post
Toshiba Elevator and Building Systems Corp. manufactured the high-speed elevator that takes visitors to the first observation deck at 350 meters in a mere 50 seconds or so. Ascending and descending at 36 kph is about 10 times faster than elevators ordinarily used in condominiums, making it the fastest now in use in Japan for those that can carry 40 people or a similarly large number.

A key concern was ensuring a comfortable ride by reducing shaking as the elevator whizzes up and down. This was partly achieved by keeping the difference at the joints of the rails used by the elevator to under 0.001 millimeter, or, as a company official said, "almost zero."
Thanks Zumen.!
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Old May 25th, 2012, 09:59 AM   #6819
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very nice construction
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Old May 25th, 2012, 06:49 PM   #6820
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http://ameblo.jp/tokyo-skytree-blog/

The next night it should be purple I assume. It will rotate between the 2 color schemes every other night.
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