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Old June 14th, 2006, 12:26 PM   #1
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SINAN Ottoman Master Architect

Kodja Mimar Sinan (1489-1578) was one of the greatest of the Ottoman architects. His many buildings include some of the most famous landmarks of the Turkish Empire.

Sinan was born in Kaisariya, Anatolia, the son of Greek Christians, on April 15, 1489. His father's name is unknown, but over his non-Turkish origin no doubt has arisen. Caught up in one of the periodic Ottoman levies aimed at drawing off healthy young minority males, who might become revolutionaries, and turning their energies instead into state service, the youthful Sinan was converted to Islam and became a Janissary. He distinguished himself in this famed military service.

Following the 1521-1522 campaigns against Belgrade and Rhodes, Sinan became chief firework operator. During the war with Persia (1534) he contrived an ingenious ferry operation for the successful transporting of troops across Lake Van. Repeatedly promoted, he was a police magistrate at the time of a Turkish invasion of the Danube Valley, during which he constructed a bridge across the river and gained considerable fame. This turned him to full-time architectural activity.

From the end of the 1530s until he died on July 15, 1578, Sinan labored throughout the Ottoman Empire, from Budapest to Mecca, erecting about 340 public structures. The four great mosques for which he is most famous are the Roxelana (1539), the Princes' (1548), which Sinan described as the work of an apprentice, and the Suleimaniye (1550-1556), the work of a journeyman, all three in Stambul (Istanbul); and the Selim II (1551-1574), the work of a master, in Edirne.

Style and Accomplishments

Light but vast domes highlight Sinan's work. Mounted on four-, six-, or eight-sided walls in a style peculiarly Turkish, they encrown extensive interior ceremonial halls. Buttresses bracing the walls were hidden by porches, and conscious attention to exterior appearances led to the development of slim, pencil like, balconied minarets that gave the 16th-century Stambul skyline its magnificent silhouette, which is apparent even today. Interiors were colorfully tiled or paneled in tinted and veined marble with frescoes of flowers or calligraphy decorating the ceilings.

Persian and Byzantine influences, particularly that of Hagia Sophia, can be seen in these structures, as can a trace of Italian Renaissance architecture, but in the work of this Ottoman genius appeared the Turkish style which gave to the reign of Suleiman I (the Magnificent) its cultural distinction. It was in the great central Byzantine dome that Turkish architecture differed from the Persian, which featured open-air central assembly areas flanked by small-domed side halls and massive minarets.

According to a contemporary biographer, the poet Mustafa Sai, Sinan was responsible, in all, for 81 mosques, including domes for the Kaaba, the holy sanctuary at Mecca; 50 chapels or small mosques; 55 madrasahs (schools); 7 Koran schools; 19 tombs; 3 hospitals; 7 aqueducts, including those of Stambul; 8 bridges; 17 poor kitchens; 3 warehouses; 18 caravansaries (fortified rest houses for travelers); 33 palaces, such as those at Scutari; and 33 baths, all commissioned by Suleiman, his daughter Mihrimah, his successors, or noblemen of the empire. Sinan is sometimes credited also with the mosque of Selim I, erected in Stambul in 1521-1522 by the Sultan's son Suleiman I, but this is in doubt: his building period seems to have begun in the late 1530s, when he was about 50 years old. He inspired many followers, including a younger Sinan with whom he is sometimes confused, hence the designation "Kodja" (the Elder). The master's favorite pupil was Yusuf, who is alleged to have built the Mogul palaces at Agra, Delhi, and Lahore.

Suleyman Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey, 1551 to 1558.





The Selimiye, at Edirne, Turkey, begun 1569.







Pics: google images

Please post more pics of this master architect.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:01 PM   #2
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Good Job mate, keep on adding info and photos!
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:05 PM   #3
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:13 PM   #4
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Here are my additions to the topic:


The Ottoman Empire during the Time of Sinan

The Ottoman Empire was established in 1299, and it grew steadily, putting an end to the Byzantine Empire in 1453. It reached its peak by the end of the 16th century. The Empire included a diversity of cultures, which were preserved locally, while its general character remained eastern and Ottoman. After its conquest, Istanbul became the artistic and cultural centre of the empire, diffusing its influence across its various provinces in proportion to the relations it maintained with them.

Eastern influences, especially those brought back from the campaigns waged in the East by Sultan Selim I and his successor Süleyman the Magnificent, also known as Kanuni (Law-Giver)- were integrated into the vast and mature Ottoman culture, as had previously been the case with Byzantine architecture. The most brilliant period of Ottoman civilisation was during the 16th and 17th centuries, during which time the most famous names achieved great feats in fields of science, administration and in the arts.

This was due in great part to the empire's economic power, but also to a well organised and stable administration, the prevalence of justice and fairness, as well as a rational world view.

In Sinan's time, the Islamic institution of the vakıf or waqf, a kind pf pious charitable foundation, was highly developed. It was through the establishment of such foundations and in a charitable spirit that sultans and members of their families, as well as viziers (ministers), and pashas (generals) contributed funds for the establishment of many public works. The wealthy also followed their examples. We can say that practically all the architectural works of that time were built by vakıfs, but it was still the State which provided the revenues for the donors.

Indeed many important State resources were entrusted to prominent people through the institution of the "mülk". And this made it possible for viziers such as Rüstem Paşa and Sokullu Mehmet Paşa (we shall henceforth use Turkish spelling for Turkish names) and princesses of the Imperial Harem, such as Hürrem Sultan and Mihrimah Sultan (the word Sultan placed after a woman's name means princess), to order numerous vakıf projects.

During the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent a most active period was witnessed in the Empire in terms of the construction of public works, and Sinan was most fortunate to have the post of chief architect at a time when resources were so abundant. The vakıf system not only permitted the building of such works, it also ensured their maintenance, which made it possible for them to survive until this day. Funds for their maintenance were provided by the revenues obtained from shops, commercial buildings and kervansarays (hostels for merchants and travellers), hamams (public baths), bedestens or mills, all constructed next to monuments built by donations. The administration of these revenues was entrusted to the vakıfs. The establishment of vakıfs was always encouraged, and many facilities were provided for that purpose. The founder of the vakıf could specify how it was to be used through its administrative statutes or vakfiye. Such freedom of choice brought a significant plurality to Ottoman social and cultural life. As for other works which were directly undertaken by the State, they consisted of military establishments, roads and bridges, as well as palaces and buildings.

Ottoman Sultans of the 16th century were not only patrons of the arts but were also directly involved in their administration. They established workshops which specialized in all kinds of crafts. Artists and artisans of the Palace (the Ehl-i Hiref), ranging from painters to calligraphers, from carpenters to jewellers, were trained at these establishments, where they were then able to contribute to the art of the Empire. The wages earned by these artists were higher than those of civil servants working at the Palace. This explains why architectural works were built with such care.





THE IMPERIAL CORPS OF ARCHITECTS

Ottoman documents reveal that there was a special architectural institution attached to the palace called the Hassa Mimarlar Ocağı (Imperial Corps of Architects). The date of the founding of this institution is not clear but we do know that it was already in existence before 1525. It was linked to the Şehremini (an individual responsible for the financing, purchasing and administrative activities related to the construction of buildings). The Hassa Chief architect was in charge of its administration. The first chief architect is believed to have been Acem Alisi (Alaüddin). The chief architect had as his assistants the water supply director, the chief of apprentices, the chief limeworker, the warehouse director, the first secretary of the warehouse, the first architect, the deputy architect, the director of repairs, and many master architects, qualified builders, foreman and artisans, as well as officers in charge of monitoring their activities. The institution was in charge of practically everything related to the empire's civil engineering, architecture and urban development activities: water supply, sewerage system, roads and pavements, building regulations, permits and their control, as well as fire prevention, the activities of architects, foremen and superintendents and their wages, the standardisation of building materials and their quality and price control.


It was also in charge of designing, erecting, maintaining and repairing buildings belonging to the imperial family, high-ranking state officials, and of appointing architects, foremen and superintendents for these tasks. In addition, it was responsible for the building of bridges, forts and other military works in times of war. Finally, it functioned as an educational institution, being in charge of the training of the most talented youths among those recruited by the "devşirme" (levy of Christian children for the Jannisary Corps and other State services).

The plans for building projects were first in the form of sketches or models and then they were submitted to the palace together with their cost estimates. Before construction began, someone was appointed to be in charge of the building, who would also be responsible for the building materials and workers, and who would regularly note down the expenses incurred. For important projects, the palace would be directly approached for the procurement of materials and staff. In the provinces, the "kadıs", who functioned both as judges and mayors, would inform the palace of their building requirements and the latter would then give orders to the chief architect. In the construction of imperial buildings, young devşirme recruits, palace artisans (Ehl-i Hiref), hired laborers and foremasters worked along with prisoners of war and convicts. Both Muslims and Christians would be employed. If necessary, architects would be sent to different provinces and sometimes abroad. The Muslim rulers of India are known to have asked the Ottoman Sultans to send them architects, and some of Sinan's students were indeed sent there.

It is believed that the Imperial Corps of Architects became masters during Sinan's time when it was restructured in order to handle the then frantic building activity. The institution lasted for some 350 years, until it was integrated into the municipality in 1831.

The information we have on the life and personality of Sinan is rather limited. We have neither manuscripts nor theoretical expositions written by him.





OTTOMAN ARCHITECTURE PRIOR TO SINAN

In order to get a better understanding of Sinan's architectural achievements, we must dwell briefly on the architectural developments that preceded them. Sinan's greatest contribution lies in his innovations regarding the use of the dome. With the exception of certain tombs, domes did not cover the whole area of buildings in the Islamic world, rather they served to enhance buildings. The Ottomans virtually identified their mosques with domes, trying out every possible variant of the form. The role of Saint Sophia in this context cannot be denied. The function of the dome was moreover not limited to covering a given area, it became a key element in the design of a mosque.
Single, multiple, plural-based or multi-functional inverted T-shaped domed mosques and their domed tombs, departing from the old kümbet form, were already a typical Ottoman style at the time when Bursa was the first capital of the empire (1326), along with domed medreses (theological seminaries), and domed hamams.

The Bursa style continued for some time after the city of Edirne was proclaimed the second capital of the Empire in 1368, but the Üç Şerefeli Mosque, built in Edirne by Murad II in 1447, is considered an innovation in the design of mosques because it introduced a plan which was to be amply developed later.

Innovative features like the hexagonal structure supporting its dome, its porticoed courtyard and its four minarets, do indeed impart a character to the mosque not typical of the period.

After the conquest of Istanbul (1453), the Saint Sophia Basilica, which was much admired by the Ottomans, became a focus of interest for Turkish architects, who practically idolized it. The Fatih (Conqueror) Külliye (a religious complex) was completed in 1471 under the reign of Mehmet II. With its sixteen medreses, its location and composition, this monumental complex put a Turkish stamp on the city. A semidome was added to the main dome of the original Fatih mosque, probably being influenced by the architecture of Saint Sophia, which brought the concept into Ottoman architecture. The old Fatih mosque was still standing in Sinan's time. It was to be destroyed in the 1776 earthquake. Also interesting is the Beyazid II Külliye in Edirne (1488), with pendentives supporting a 20m diameter dome and the design of its hospital. The interior of the mosque is dominated by a single dome. The side walls have windows and the dome supports are almost unnoticeable. This was the prototype for the Mihrimah Mosque in Edirnekapı, which Sinan was to build some 80 years later. The Beyazid II Mosque in Istanbul (1506) is an improved version of the old Fatih Mosque. The influence of Saint Sophia may also be felt here, but must not be considered to be a simple copy.

The works mentioned above indicate that Ottoman architecture was already developed by the time Sinan appeared.




THE LIFE OF SINAN

The information we have on the life and personality of Sinan is rather limited. We have neither manuscripts nor theoretical expositions written by him. If there are any sketches or plans anonymously drawn by him as was the practice at the time, they have not reached us.

Sinan was a Christian born in Ağırnas village, in Kayseri province. We do not know the precise date of his birth, but it must have been somewhere between 1494 and 1499. He was recruited in 1512 or 1513 by the "devşirme" to be enrolled in the Janissary Corps. It was the first time a child was recruited for that purpose in the Kayseri region. Sinan must have been between fourteen and eighteen years old at the time. Some of the Christian children who were recruited into the Devşirme system became part of the Janissary Corps, while others were sent to the palace after receiving an education, and served the government. Sinan was trained in the Acemi Ocağı, a sort of palace school, where he learnt carpentry and worked on building sites. During the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, he became a member of the Janissary Corps in the Belgrade and Rhodes campaigns in 1521 and 1522 resprectively, after which he was given the rank of "Atlısekban." He was promoted to the rank of "Yayabaşı" after the Mohacs battle, and later to that of "Kapıyayabaşı." He participated in the German campaign between 1529-32 as a "Zemberekçibaşı," as well as in the Iran and Baghdad campaigns (the Irakeyn campaign) in 1534-1535. He built three fully equipped and armed galleys for the crossing of Lake Van. As a result of this and his other achievements as an engineer in previous campaigns, he was promoted to the rank of "Haseki" in the sultan's bodyguard. After the Puglia and Korfu campaigns (1537), he won wide acclaim for the bridge he built in a very short time during the Moldavian campaign. During this campaign, the chief architect,Acem Alisi died, upon which the Sadrazam (Prime Minister) Lütfi Paşa appointed Sinan, then a "Subaşı" (Superintendent), to the post of "Mimarbaşı" (Chief Architect). Sinan's previous achievements in civil architecture played an important role in this promotion. When recalling this event, Sinan says he was sad to leave the army but happy to have the opportunity to accomplish other important things such as building mosques. Sinan was already of a mature age when he became chief architect. He had seen monuments and works of different cultures during the campaigns in which he participated both in the west and in the east. He had been faced with problems that needed rapid solutions, and the army had given him discipline, self-control and organizational skills. The training and experience he had must have helped him develop his skills in designing and in administration. Sinan's career as chief architect lasted for some fifty years.

According to the documents which list his works, he designed, supervised, built or restored as many as 400 buildings. But if we consider the fact that he was in charge of the Imperial Corps of Architects and that Ottoman territory was vast , it becomes difficult to conceive that all these works were personally produced by Sinan. However, with the exception of those built towards the end of his life, the buildings erected in Istanbul are assumed to be his. Moreover most of Sinan's smaller buildings have not survived in their original form, however the works Sinan had created in Istanbul are sufficient to demonstrate his enormous contribution to Turkish architecture.

Architects do not seem to have held an important place in the Ottoman State protocol. At a time when the empire was very powerful, Sinan designed buildings for three successive sultans, as well as for numerous palace notables, a sure sign that he enjoyed great popularity and was much appreciated as an architect. The fact that Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent would have asked Sinan to lead the opening ceremony for the Süleymaniye Mosque even though he had had it built in his own name, is another unmistakable indication of such appreciation and esteem. According to the charter of the vakıf he founded in 1563, Sinan was able to acquire a fortune including 18 mansions, 38 shops, 9 houses, land, mills, small mosques and schools. In 1583 he made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and had his life story and a list of his works recorded by a poet friend. According to the inscription on his tomb, which is situated next to the Süleymaniye Mosque, Sinan died in 1588.

Sinan obviously had a perfect understanding of the topography of Istanbul, the city in which he designed so many buildings, and he was able to make the most of this knowledge. It is probably not wrong to suppose that he must have visited and studied the architecture of Saint Sophia very often.

At that time, Istanbul was a developed city, which was adorned with hundreds of new buildings, some of which were ordered built by the most powerful Ottoman Sultans, such as Fatih Sultan Mehmet and Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent, as well as their relatives and high ranking state officials. All the revenues of the Empire flowed into the city where the best artisans and artists gathered. Sinan was at the head of an organisation in charge of the vast territories of the Empire, with numerous buildings being built in such places stretching from Bosnia to Bagdad and from Crimea to Yemen. Sinan had had the opportunity to travel to many countries, where he studied and closely analyzed much of the architecture. Besides his sense of space, he had acquired vast knowledge regarding buttressing systems. That he should have designed the Şehzade Mosque only two years after being named chief architect is an indication not only of his architectural skills, but also of his vast experience and perception. Throughout his life, Sinan constantly studied, carried out experiments and sought answers to problems in topography, space, mass and buttresses. In doing so, he provided diverse and highly elaborate solutions, which make him the great master of Ottoman, and even Islamic architecture.




THE WORKS OF SINAN

According to the sources available on Sinan's career, he produced more than four hundred works. It may be safer to say that these works were built or restored during his lifetime. We shall not attempt to describe each and every one of Sinan's works but rather focus on the most important ones, as well as those which are most representative of his art.

Religious complexes (Külliyes) had diverse public service functions, the most important of which was religious. The main building of the complex was the mosque, followed by the medrese or theological seminary. The complex would usually also include the following: a soup kitchen or refectory, guesthouse, hospital, school, public bath, fountain, water distribution kiosk and shops. The tomb of the person who had ordered the project would generally be situated within the complex. Külliyes situated on the main caravan routes would include in addition to the kervansaray, a prayer hall, hamam, soup kitchen, shops and stables. The külliyes were powerful social poles, and the fact that they were conceived as vakıfs ensured their continuity. The activities carried out in these complexes considerably stimulated the urban development of the areas in which they were built. Therefore, many külliyes were built in newly settled areas in order to help in their development. The duties and rights of each külliye were specified in detail in the foundation's charter and the people in charge of the vakıf implemented the regulations in the charter.

The külliyes designed by Sinan were exquisitely conceived, be it from the standpoint of the site chosen, integration with rough terrain, or as regards harmony achieved with the city's general skyline. Most of Sinan’s structures are situated on hilltops or along the seashore where they can be easily seen. They strike the eye as one approaches the city, constituting an inseparable part of its silhouette. The choice of the site is not only related to the Külliye's appearance from afar, but also to the view one has of the city from inside the complex, a view enhanced with the spectacle of the sea offered by the shores of the Bosphorus and Golden Horn. Sinan was especially skilled in adopting his design to sloping terrains. Solving such problems seems to have been like some sort of entertaining crossword puzzle for him. The buildings which constitute the külliye are very skilfully situated at levels corresponding to their function and importance. The final result is a well graded complex offering a fine appearance visible from afar, and forming an organic whole dominated by the mosque.
“Sinan, The Architect and his Works”, by Reha Günay, translated by Ali Ottoman
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:20 PM   #5
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Great thread but needs a correction Sinan is not a Turk with Greek descent but Armenian. Both ways we are proud of Sinan's works...

btw what's all these frenzy on Turkish related topics coming from Greeks?
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:20 PM   #6
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Actually my graduation thesis of Venice University was about water's adventure in Istanbul among the history. There is wealth info also about Sinan in it but it's in Italian.. When I have time to translate it in english, I may share that part with you forumers.. The architecture he has used for water supplying and bringin it from mountains to a city with dense population wasn't easy. Fascinating story..
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Old June 14th, 2006, 01:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Sinan was a Christian born in Ağırnas village, in Kayseri province.
The part I've added mentiones of it though. However if sb comes over with any further info is well appreciated.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 07:33 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CityZen
Throughout his life, Sinan constantly studied, carried out experiments and sought answers to problems in topography, space, mass and buttresses. In doing so, he provided diverse and highly elaborate solutions, which make him the great master of Ottoman, and even Islamic architecture.

“Sinan, The Architect and his Works”, by Reha Günay, translated by Ali Ottoman
Couldn't ask for a more thorough (or prompt) summary. Very insightful.

Sinan's life and times were prolific. The vakif is fascinating. I wonder if it influenced western humanism or vice versa, considering there was plurality and a rational world view in that 'golden age'.

I can imagine how Saint Sophia would inspire them to innovate the dome, making it the 'key element' or distinguishing feature (like the pencil-like minaret), of Ottoman architecture. Domes have an awe-inspiring aura.

Sinan was a renaissance man in the true sense of the word. I know much of his smaller work has been lost or modified, but do you or anyone else have pics of madrasahs, bridges, warehouses, tombs etc as well as kulliyes masterplans and his 'Magnum Opus' in Edirne, which I read somewhere doesn't face Mecca for some reason.

Thanks a lot. Great work. Excellent translation.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 07:36 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Istanbullu
Great thread but needs a correction Sinan is not a Turk with Greek descent but Armenian. Both ways we are proud of Sinan's works...
He could have been Greek or Armenian we don't know, since the Ottomans only recorded people's religious backgrounds (not ethnicities). Anyway, that's not the subject..
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Old June 14th, 2006, 07:45 PM   #10
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Sinani family emigrated from Albania (Elbasan city) to Turkey.
They were albanian.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 08:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Istanbullu
Great thread but needs a correction Sinan is not a Turk with Greek descent but Armenian.
Another source. Anyway, it doesn't matter. He's Turkish, a prolific Turkish and world architect trained at Ottoman institutions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Istanbullu
btw what's all these frenzy on Turkish related topics coming from Greeks?
Anyone interested in architecture would be interested in Turkey. There are many layers. Not surprising really for Greeks either, as people of the region who fit into those layers, to have a common historical and even sentimental interest.

btw as a local, do you have pics of the Imperial College of Istanbul or any other Sinan era works? It'll be cool if you can show us.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:02 PM   #12
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The Dolmabahce Sarayi. This is the masterpiece in Istanbul. Not one of Sinan's works to the best of my knowledge, still of great significance. Also, I like the Ortakoy mosque. Yet another masterpiece...
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:15 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozcan
He could have been Greek or Armenian we don't know, since the Ottomans only recorded people's religious backgrounds (not ethnicities). Anyway, that's not the subject..
we of course know... No matterwhat source anyone shows, it doesn't mean anything. sources of the internet are not real sources.

The one of the most important linguistic and historians about this subject is a Turkish Armenian Pars Tuğlacı (please search about him), he already translated the letters of Sinan to his family in Ağırnas village. And he was for sure Armenian decent Turk. Please nobody should try to show any empty and meaningless sources because if anyone is number one of his fact in the world (Pars Tuğlacı has many presidental awards, professorship at many univiersities). Today we have many original letters in ur archieves. And I don't understand how foreigners insist on anything without seeing these archieves, reading the original sources. Also Mimar Sinan University has a great archieve on him (normally and very naturally) We have the letters of Sokolo Mehmet Pasha, Mimar Sinan, and other important figures. For example the letters of Sokolo Mehmet Pasha to his own borther who was Serbian Archibishop, are still on our archieves and archieves are open to everyone.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:24 PM   #14
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I think we should skip talks about his ethnicty and focus on his masterpieces.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:28 PM   #15
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btw, It's nice both Greeks and Albanians want to think he was a Greek decented or Albanian. As an information; many important figure of Ottoman Empire had both Greek and Albanian blood no doubt. Some other architects, poets, politicians, soldiers ect ect. But Sinan was not one of them.

As I said before, the proud Admiral of Turkish history, Barbaros Hayrettin Pasha had Greek blood, actualy he was born in Mytillini. Also as an Albanian as we told before our national poet the poet of our national anthm Mehmet Akif Ersoy was originally Albanian.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:29 PM   #16
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but the photos on the thread are too old... WE need to show detailed and recent photos of the sutructures...
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:34 PM   #17
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Shah jahan of Mughals had heard of the famous architect Sinan, he wanted him to contruct a giant mosque, Ottomans wouldnt send him, instead of they sended his students to him. They contructed the dome of Taj mahal.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:39 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuvvaci
we of course know... No matterwhat source anyone shows, it doesn't mean anything. sources of the internet are not real sources.

The one of the most important linguistic and historians about this subject is a Turkish Armenian Pars Tuğlacı (please search about him), he already translated the letters of Sinan to his family in Ağırnas village. And he was for sure Armenian decent Turk. Please nobody should try to show any empty and meaningless sources because if anyone is number one of his fact in the world (Pars Tuğlacı has many presidental awards, professorship at many univiersities). Today we have many original letters in ur archieves. And I don't understand how foreigners insist on anything without seeing these archieves, reading the original sources. Also Mimar Sinan University has a great archieve on him (normally and very naturally) We have the letters of Sokolo Mehmet Pasha, Mimar Sinan, and other important figures. For example the letters of Sokolo Mehmet Pasha to his own borther who was Serbian Archibishop, are still on our archieves and archieves are open to everyone.
Thanks for the info, I guess I was wrong then. Of course things like letters, archeological findings etc. are primary sources. What I don't understand is, how people can lie about it if it's so obvious that he was of Armenian descent.

Last edited by Ozcan; June 14th, 2006 at 09:47 PM.
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:47 PM   #19
Saimir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kuvvaci
btw, It's nice both Greeks and Albanians want to think he was a Greek decented or Albanian. As an information; many important figure of Ottoman Empire had both Greek and Albanian blood no doubt. Some other architects, poets, politicians, soldiers ect ect. But Sinan was not one of them.

As I said before, the proud Admiral of Turkish history, Barbaros Hayrettin Pasha had Greek blood, actualy he was born in Mytillini. Also as an Albanian as we told before our national poet the poet of our national anthm Mehmet Akif Ersoy was originally Albanian.

That's only because all famous people "are" Greek It's interesting isn't it that a Greek would contribute so much to islamic architecture!
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Old June 14th, 2006, 09:57 PM   #20
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Maybe I should write an article on the net, explaining that Aristotle was a Turk.
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