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Old August 16th, 2013, 06:58 AM   #221
FM 2258
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I might sound like a lot of people here, they should get rid of that rubber tired tram and slap down some rails.
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Old August 29th, 2013, 07:23 AM   #222
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Completion of Line 2

As of 2013.08.28, trains now run the full length of Line 2. Before that date, Line 2 was split in half, with a missing section between Dongnanjiao and Tianjinzhan (railway station) stations. The completion of Line 2 included the beginning of service on a new station (Jianguodao).


Source: Mandarin Wikipedia (http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ti...AO_Station.JPG)

There are pictures here:
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/ph...32670425_4.htm
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Old August 29th, 2013, 08:05 AM   #223
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Finally the gap is filled.



more pictures of Line 2's full operation

Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR View Post
Last Updated: 2013-08-28
Xinhua

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr

Passengers take the Subway Line 2 in Tianjin, north China, Aug. 28, 2013. The Subway Line 2 of Tianjin, with 19 stations and a total
length of 22.6 kilometers, was put into operation on Wednesday.


image hosted on flickr

Passengers are seen at the Tianjinzhan Station of the Subway Line 2 in Tianjin, north China, Aug. 28, 2013.

image hosted on flickr

A passenger waits for the subway train at the Jianguodao Station of the Subway Line 2 in Tianjin, north China, Aug. 28, 2013.
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Old August 30th, 2013, 04:56 AM   #224
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Tianjin really needs to catch up with the metro work, if don't they are going to have huge transportation problems. All the new cbds being built, just imagine if there was no metro connecting downtown to binhai and yujiapu after all the cbds are completed . Oh no............

How many lines are proposed and uc for tianjin?
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 06:21 PM   #225
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FOOLISH AUTHORITY OF TIANJIN

Tianjin’ great tram network was closed in 1972 for some blunt reasons –

“The infrastructure and fleet of the systems that closed service in the 1970's were usually in very bad condition. So it was easier and cheaper for the companies to change to bus-service because the cities made the streets often completely new in these days because of the many new cars. They also thought that there is no place for trams on the streets anymore and that the old and slowly trams will disturb the car- and bus-traffic.”

If you see to many Asian cities, which is also very old, even older and congested than Tianjin, was prevented the world’s sixties trend to close tram networks. They patiently improved their infrastructure & fleets step by step, and imported sometimes foreign trams also. They gradually increased their network with both reserved and unreserved track. Tianjin could do that. By gradually improving rolling stocks looking those cities, they can maintain their network. Even my city Kolkata, where tram is under trouble, still has a good network.

1) The advent of buses and large scale competition meant that buses often ran the same routes as the trams and would jump in front in order to "grab" customers.

Buses are still present in Tianjin, even much more than before. Aren’t they competing with tram now? If now tram can attract more people than bus, I think if Tianjin Transport Authority should be patient, trams would sure survived, even defeat bus. Actually they started following other cities for withdrawing tram during fifties.

2) While buses were able to move into Tianjin’s expanding hinterland quicker and at less cost that the trams.

Current tram network has situated in suburb, and the infrastructure is more expensive like bus (includes masts, wires, stops, etc., even costlier due to rubber tired system). But they are very popular for commuters than bus. If now they can re-make that costly infrastructure, why not past? Previous network was much ordinary than present. Actually they were lobbying the automobile industry, and the industry started marketing automobiles, like many cities around the world.

3) The belief that trams were outdated and old technology meanwhile,

If tram is really outdated, why the transport authority returned it in Tianjin? It clearly shows that outdated technology idea was completely fake.

4) There was a belief that buses were cheaper to run than trams.

Although initial construction cost of tramway network is higher, but it is profitable for long term, because buses runs on diesel, which is being costly month by month over the world, and also decreasing from nature’s storage. Diesel can’t be made artificially, but electricity can make from various sources, like air, water, tide etc, so it is unlimited, and it is also pollution free.

5) The system was in a poor state of repair.

Many cities around the Asia, has maintained tram, struggling over World War 2, by investing seriously on track & rolling stocks. Even I live in Kolkata, but my city has still a good tram network. When Tianjin closed their tram in 1972, Kolkata’s tram has started its decline – but still one of the large system in Asia. So “impossible repairing” is just another lie.

6) The overcrowded and heaving trams running at a high frequency, in competition with growing private motor car and bus use, created congestion.

Buses are still present in Tianjin, even much more than before. Aren’t they competing with tram now? If now tram can attract more people than bus, I think if Tianjin Transport Authority should be patient, trams would sure survived, even defeat bus. It says that trams were overcrowded, it means were very popular among the citizens, and also ran on high frequency, means a reliable service. Actually they started following other cities for withdrawing tram during sixties.

7) Competition from the private car, private bus operators and the perception of traffic congestion led to the gradual closure of lines from the 1970s.

Despite the competition with automobile, they were very popular among citizens due to high frequency. Actually they were lobbying the automobile industry, and the industry started marketing automobiles, like many cities around the world.

8) Closure was supported by the authority, but generally went against public opinion.

It is very natural that ordinary people can’t be against with tram. Tram is pollution free, gentle and a status symbol of a civilized city. Even I live in Kolkata, but my city has still a good tram network.

Tianjin’ previous tram survived from 1906 to 1972 and closed for those fake reasons. Tram reopened in 2007. So are we sure that around 2073, Tianjin will not again close its tram for some updated closure reasons?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 06:35 AM   #226
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Quote:
I've also searched detailed history about Dalian's tram, especially about closed routes, but still I haven't get answer.
FWIW, here's a web page with an old map of Dalian, circa 1931, which shows the routes of the tram system at that time. Click on a section to get a close-up.

http://ifs.nog.cc/dalian2006.hp.info...p/page004.html
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 07:08 AM   #227
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I still don't get it..................why did they go with the rubber tired trams to begin with?
Were they manufactured in Tianjin so it created local employment?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 11:56 AM   #228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ssiguy2 View Post
I still don't get it..................why did they go with the rubber tired trams to begin with?
Were they manufactured in Tianjin so it created local employment?
I wouldn't be surprised if the Translohr people dropped a big bag of money in front of some decision makers in Tianjin... accidently, of course
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 04:02 PM   #229
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I guess European companies now just don't have money to "drop the big bag", they struggle to find new markets for their production.
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 06:45 PM   #230
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I think that might have more to do with some of the obvious drawbacks of guided rubber-tired transportation that have surfaced since then (creation of ruts in the road surface, higher rolling resistance leading to higher energy consumption, having to rely on one manufacturer, effectively giving them a monopoly, etc.).
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Old September 10th, 2013, 10:20 AM   #231
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Main problem is, it is in Japanese, which I can't read. Could you please inform me about an English map of such network?
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Old September 11th, 2013, 05:09 AM   #232
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Did you post the wrong post? Tianjin is in China. Not Japan! Hope this helps
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Old September 11th, 2013, 06:47 AM   #233
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This is indeed written in Japanese:

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Old September 11th, 2013, 01:58 PM   #234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puppetgeneral View Post
Did you post the wrong post? Tianjin is in China. Not Japan! Hope this helps
Since 1945, yes.

Japan held Dalian since 1905, and the rest of Manchuria/Manchukuo since 1931-1932... and built a lot of stuff there.

But Tianjin only since the Marco Polo bridge in 1937.

Did Japanese and their National Government build anything useful in Mainland China they held between 1937...1945, or were they up to destruction only?
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Old September 12th, 2013, 03:59 AM   #235
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Anyway, why did they choice the rubber-tired trams in the first place?
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Old December 26th, 2013, 06:07 AM   #236
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Tianjin metro Line 3 extension to South Station will open on Dec 28 2013

Extension to South Railway Station
Length: 4.1 km
Stations: 3 elevated

Tianjin metro map of 2014



map by lyt
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Last edited by big-dog; January 2nd, 2014 at 08:57 AM.
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Old December 27th, 2013, 07:50 AM   #237
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puppetgeneral View Post
Tianjin really needs to catch up with the metro work, if don't they are going to have huge transportation problems. All the new cbds being built, just imagine if there was no metro connecting downtown to binhai and yujiapu after all the cbds are completed . Oh no............

How many lines are proposed and uc for tianjin?
There are 24 urban lines and 4 intercity lines proposed. Currently 4 lines are under construction:
  • Line 1 east extension, opening 2015
  • Line 2 extension to new airport terminal, opening 6-30-2014
  • Line 5 opening 2015
  • Line 6 opening 2015
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Old December 28th, 2013, 01:03 AM   #238
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Lots of wining but I think its the right move. The Tianjin Metro so far has China's most disappointing expansion speeds and ridership. Chongqing has a similarly sized network with 40% more riders per day. Nanjing has a 40% smaller network and double the ridership.

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Tianjin's car-buying restriction raises doubts


A newly imposed limit on private car ownership in North China's Tianjin Municipality has caught citizens unprepared, prompting questions over the rule's abruptness and necessity.

The Tianjin municipal government announced on December 15 that the city would impose a quota on its new car license plates, requiring residents to obtain a plate through either bidding in auctions or joining lotteries.

The policy, part of the city's efforts to battle congestion and air pollution, took effect only five hours after its announcement at 7pm, touching off panic-buying of both new and second-hand vehicles.

On the night of December 15, car dealers in Tianjin were teeming with anxious customers, some of whom rushed to the store even without changing their pajamas or work clothes.

To handle the purchase frenzy, some stores temporarily required all buyers to pay in full and rejected phone orders.

"The rule came in such a hurry. Why not hold a hearing beforehand to solicit opinions from citizens? Or at least they can pilot the scheme for some time before making it a permanent policy," said a postgraduate student surnamed Cao in Tianjin.

Cao planned to purchase a home in the city's outskirts, where house prices are much lower than downtown areas, and then buy a car to commute to work after her graduation. However, the car-buying restriction wrecked her plan.

"I don't think bidding for car plates is fair to ordinary working-class people, since the rich can simply pay extra money to bypass the limit," she said.

So far, the city government has not revealed details on the quota or how many plates will be allocated by lottery compared with auction.

Previously, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Guiyang have restricted the number of vehicles registered each year.

Beijing and Guiyang issue plates through a lottery while Shanghai uses a bidding scheme. Guangzhou adopts both systems, half issued through bidding, the other half through a lottery.

Between the Guangzhou city government announcing the limit in June and the rule taking effect, there were only three hours for residents to snap up cars.

Guan Xinping, a sociology professor at Tianjin-based Nankai University, said the Tianjin government made the abrupt announcement of the car-buying limit in order to avoid stronger social panic and other over-reactions.

"If the policy had been unveiled a month before it took effect, that would have triggered a longer period of panic-buying," said Guan.

Even though the government's intention was understandable, he said, its approach may not be the best option.

"Authorities should fully consult the public before rolling out a rule like this, which affects the interests of many people," according to the professor.

In fact, there were hints of the car-buying limit in Tianjin earlier this year. In August, a development guideline issued by the city government said it would consider curbing the number of cars on the road. In early December, the city's deputy mayor made similar remarks in a TV show on the state television network CCTV.

Quick fix

Another controversy swirling around the policy is whether the city, with 2.36 million motor vehicles registered in 2012, really needs to follow the lead of Beijing, which has 5.3 million cars.

In addition to the purchase limit, the Tianjin government said on December 15 that it would also adopt a traffic restriction scheme, which keeps cars off the roads depending on the last digit of their plates, copying Beijing's move starting five years ago.

The ban, which will come into force on March 1 next year, is expected to take one-fifth of the city's private cars off the roads on workdays.

A statement from the city government said the "explosive" growth of car ownership, a surge of a million in the past three years, has resulted in severe traffic gridlock.

Previous government data indicated that vehicle emissions account for 16 percent of the city's fine particulate matter PM2.5, constituting an important contributor to its lingering smog.

The buying limit and traffic restriction will certainly restrain the number of vehicles, but they are not permanent solutions, warned Li Yuheng, a senior researcher with CIConsulting, a leading domestic consulting company specializing in industry research.

The fundamental problems are the excessive concentration of the city's resources and defective transport planning, Li said. He suggested the government transfer some industries away from the city's core areas.

Auto industry insider Jia Xinguang added that the most effective measure to alleviate traffic jams is to develop rail transit, which should handle at least 60 percent of the city's traffic flow.

"Counting on restrictions on vehicles to cure the 'city disease' is like giving cancer patients pain killers," Jia said.

Tianjin's mass transit systems lag far behind Beijing and Shanghai, as the city of 14 million people has only three subway lines.

In a guideline issued in September, the Tianjin government set goals for the development of the public transport network.

It vowed to extend the length of the city's subway lines to 183 kilometers and the length of exclusive bus lanes to 194 kilometers, as well as increase its bus routes to 621 by 2015.
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Old December 30th, 2013, 03:11 PM   #239
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Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
6) Things are even worse: AFAIK there was no other lines when line 9 opened , as line 1 was closed down for reconstruction then. And it wasn't line 9 either, it was line B1. Only when they started to open the section towards the railway station it was renumbered to line 9.
Then again, neighbouring Beijing has a similar history. For decades there were the lines 1 and 2, then in 2003 line 13 opened. Line 3, numerically the next in line, is slated to open 2019 or 2020, 16-17 years later. The current planning hold-up for line 3, as I gather, is that one of the stations will connect to the Beijing-Shenyang HSR, which has been moved as irate neighbours were unhappy with the original plans.
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Old December 30th, 2013, 04:07 PM   #240
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Then again, neighbouring Beijing has a similar history. For decades there were the lines 1 and 2, then in 2003 line 13 opened. Line 3, numerically the next in line, is slated to open 2019 or 2020, 16-17 years later. The current planning hold-up for line 3, as I gather, is that one of the stations will connect to the Beijing-Shenyang HSR, which has been moved as irate neighbours were unhappy with the original plans.
Line 3 was hold up as its center section passes just north of the Forbidden City. The authorities are concerned about relics underground, and the running lines are also too close to the political center of PRC, the Central and South Sea (Zhong Nan Hai). There were plans to split the line into two separate lines - 3-East and 3-West, and further delay the central section. There are also plans to route Line 3 to run parallel to Line 6 for the central section, with each line in different section of tunnels.
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