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Old July 20th, 2007, 07:42 PM   #61
arzaranh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
Think before saying!
ummm... i think he's right
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Old July 20th, 2007, 08:00 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YelloPerilo View Post
I understand you too well, but many Chinese won't share your opion, which is sad. This IMO has a lot to do with the historical development of China of the last 150 years. European imperialism, China's cultural decline, civil wars, desastrous socio-economical policies at the infant stage of the PRC and the destruction of much Chinese tradition and absence of any kind of cultural education, which was substituted by a materialist doctrine gave a great part of the Chinese society a seriously low self esteem facing a seemingly far wealthier "Western" society.

Many Chinese seem to be nationalistic when talking about China, but in their every day life they would not mind to destroy what the Cultural Revolution has left and replace it with tacky "Western" imitates (go to any Chinese cities and see all the bloody fake Baroque mansions) and at the same time making silly excuses why old houses cannot be modernised...
...On the surface many Chinese seem to be proud of their cultural heritage, but deep inside not a few of them are insecure and full of blind w(h)oreship of anything that is attached with a "Western" sticker.
i can't tell you how much i agree. i have seen this attitude in many non western societies - so many that i some times wonder if i'm the one who is messed up in the head.
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Old July 21st, 2007, 06:39 AM   #63
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INDONESIAN ARCHITECTURE


Indonesian Architecture reflects the same diversity of cultural, historical, and geographic influences that have shaped Indonesia as a whole. Invaders, colonisers, missionaries, merchants and traders brought cultural changes that had a pronounced effect on building styles and techniques. Traditionally, the most significant foreign influence has been Indian, but Chinese, Arab, and since the 18th and 19th centuries, European influences which have been important.


JAVA


Prambanan temple complex





Borobudur, the largest buddhist monument on earth





Amanjiwo, a hotel in central Java





BALI

Besakih
Temple


[IMG][/IMG]

Tirtagangga Water Palace





SUMATRA

Minangkabau Palace


Batak traditionnal house
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Old July 21st, 2007, 07:17 AM   #64
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Post more whatever masterpiece traditional Asian architecture!
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Old July 22nd, 2007, 12:28 PM   #65
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Terengganu
by kebeckham7

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr
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Old July 22nd, 2007, 07:33 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
by FineShots

image hosted on flickr
by Christopher Chan

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Old July 23rd, 2007, 06:32 AM   #67
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Malay House

Quote:
OLD
Terengganu

NEW
Danga bay, Johor

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Old July 23rd, 2007, 06:38 AM   #68
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Last edited by nazrey; July 23rd, 2007 at 06:45 AM.
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Old July 25th, 2007, 11:22 PM   #69
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Quote:
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Wow where is this? It looks so much like the house styles in bangladesh.
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Old July 26th, 2007, 05:42 AM   #70
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Danga Bay, Johor (Bordering to Singapore)
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Old July 26th, 2007, 04:32 PM   #71
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I just love the old asian architecture, we need more topics and pics of it ;-)
thanks guys for sharing the great stuff!
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Old August 1st, 2007, 01:48 PM   #72
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most of China's imperial cities were destroyed with each regime change, 'positive feedom' in action and last seen in the Cultural Revolution. This is why a region as populated and ancient as Europe, filled with historic cities hasnt one remaining intact. Hangzhou is one such example, including a 500ft pagoda complex centrepiece of a city that was the Eastern counterpart (and larger) to Rome and her Empire, and that was last destroyed in the 1815 Taiping Rebellion when it burned to the ground with much loss of life. Hangzhou differed from the other great imperial cities as it had no traditional height limits (no taller than the palaces), and its buildings were 10 storeys high.
At various times Nanjing, Beijing, Xian, Hangzhou and Louyang were once the largest cities on earth, for centuries before their destruction and abandonment. There have been palaces at Xian that were once 7.5x, 6x, and 3.5x larger than the Forbidden City, currently the worlds largest palace with 980 buildings and 8700 rooms, and covering 780,000 sq m.

I have to say though the periodic mass destruction of the symbols of the old regimes has enabled the Chinese civilisation to adapt and last for more than 6000 years, the world's longest surviving civilisation.

Last edited by the spliff fairy; August 1st, 2007 at 02:00 PM.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 01:49 PM   #73
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Take modern day Beijing and although destroyed many times in its history, we can chart its last destruction. Set up as a vast square in plan surrounded by the largest ever city walls, 40 miles in length with fortress gates that were the tallest buildings in the city, and castle sized watchtowers. The city was formed of concentric rings leading to the final inner sanctum of the Hall of Supreme Harmony in the Forbidden City. The city walls were bulldozed in the 1950s for the expanding population. Some watchtowers and sections have since been rebuilt.






Inside was the dense Chinese city, a maze of centuries old brick and tile hutongs 'as fine and numerous as the hairs on a cow'. This is what has been mostly destroyed in the current economic revolution.
Another concentric ring of walls divided into the Tatar City where the Manchurian rulers lived. When the Nationalist govt came to power in the 1920s there were 3000 temples and palaces in Beijing. Within a decade that had been reduced to 300,many of which would later be destroyed in the Cultural Revolution.


Then came the Inner City of 28 massive temple complexes and studded with palaces for ruling officials. Much of this city was destroyed in the Boxer Rebellion by the Western colonial powers.



Then came the fabled Forbidden City which still survives but was looted and badly damaged by the colonial troops during the infamous Opium Wars and once again in the Boxer Rebelllion.



When Japan invaded in 1925 millions of artefacts were shipped onto 3 trains for safekeeping in Nanjing, half of which was returned after the war, and the other half sent onto a train shuttling back and forth across China while a new Civil War raged on. This train formed the nucleus of the collection of 10,000 crates of imperial treasures and paintings. As the Nationalists were evacuating to Taiwan they were forced to leave behind 6000 crates on the jetty, a scene unforgettable to the main collector and auditor. The remaining 3000 crates now form the National Palace Museum in Taipei, the largest surviving collection of Chinese art with 700,000 pieces, a fraction of which can only be displayed. The fate of all the rest probably lies in destruction or sits on mantlepieces across Europe and NA. Go now to the Forbidden City and the place is eerily empty, large shells of buildings.

the remains of the Forbidden City collections lie in 7 vast climate controlled chambers in the hill behind the National Palace Museum building on the outskirts of Taipei:



The outer palaces were also destroyed by colonial troops, notably the Old Summer Palace which was 5x larger than the Forbidden City and had the largest gardens ever built, including recreations of classical Southern landscapes and Tibetan, Mongolian and European styled palaces. 40 lakes each had an island with a palace within, aswell as being a vast depository for the imperial art. In October 6th 1860 after the Chinese boarded a British boat in Canton and threw off the opium, the British and French troops marched on the palace and massacred 1000 of the inhabitants, then looted it for 36 hrs. When Chinese surrender didnt emerge it was destroyed, taking 3500 troops and 3 days to burn to the ground, many of whom were appalled. Much of the treasures inside dated to 3600 years of Chinese history and formed the largest museum in the world:

"We went out, and, after pillaging it, burned the whole place, destroying in a vandal-like manner most valuable property which [could] not be replaced for four millions. We got upward of £48 apiece prize money….I have done well. The [local] people are very civil, but I think the grandees hate us, as they must after what we did the Palace. You can scarcely imagine the beauty and magnificence of the places we burnt. It made one’s heart sore to burn them; in fact, these places were so large , and we were so pressed for time , that we could not plunder then carefully. Quantities of gold ornaments were burnt, considered as brass. It was wretchedly demoralising work for an army."



remains of the European palaces




the new Summer Palace on a new site, an attempt at a recreation of the old splendour, was once again looted and destroyed in 1900 by British and American troops. It was rebuilt 2 years later on a smaller scale (only 70,000 sq m of buildings):

Longevity Hill


Basically imagine this century long destruction compressed to a few years for the fate of Changan, Xian, Hangzhou, Louyang, Nanjing

Last edited by the spliff fairy; August 1st, 2007 at 04:00 PM.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 02:08 PM   #74
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Another example is Tokyo of course, periodically Edo being the largest city in the world in its history. Its centrepice was Edo-jo, the largest castle ever built with 5 concentric rings of defences designed to confound and confuse attacking armies with dead ends and traps (even then the clever Samurai were able to defeat it).

This is a city thats suffered hugely too, the 'blossoms of Edo' referred to by the residents through years past are the periodic fires that take out huge swathes of the city and killing hundreds of thousands.


The Mereiki Fire, or Long Sleeves Fire of 1657 has a haunting history - a beautiful kimono was made by a woman, Kiku, in love with a royal page. The pattern he wore on his shoes she made into cloth, but died suddenly before she could wear it at age 16. Draped over her coffin on 16th January 1655 the kimono was later given to another teenager, Hana who died a year later without ever wearing it. Once again the kimono was draped over her coffin, her funeral coinciding once again on 16th January. The kimono found itself at a pawnshop where the young girl who worked there, Tatsu, took it for herself. On her subsequent funeral a year and 2 days later, 18th January 1657, the kimono deemed so unlucky was burnt at an exorcism ritual in Hongjyo Temple. A 'sudden wind' sprang up as it was lit spreading a fire that ultimately destroyed 2/3 of the city, including 300 palaces, 600 temples, 3000 shops, and the worlds largest castle ever built, Edo-Jo. The death toll was 107,000 (recorded)- 200,000 (estimated), or half the city's population.




Then there was the Great Kwanto quake of 1923 that killed 140,000 and destroyed most of Japan's national treasures as the National Museum was lost - the damage was emmense, the worlds largest city hit by quake followed by tsunami and fire, makes it the worlds most costliest and damaging natural disaster to this day.
One European eyewitness reports standing on the docks of Yokohama - the pier was swaying so he didnt feel the quake, but was awestruck by a 'strange cloud' that started at one end of the seafront and spread its way from right to left across the horizon, in eerie silence - he was in fact seeing the dust sprung into the air by the collapse of thousands of buildings across the city. The fire that followed was marked by devastating firestorms, whirlwinds of fire that sucked people into them. In the aftermath 6000 Koreans were systematically massacred by the mobs and police 'to quell a Korean riot'.:











WWII
the new city of 1932

The most recent blossom was the destruction of, if it had survived, of the worlds greatest art deco city and newly rebuilt -by the worst bombing raids in the world - one night alone 80,000 were killed, burned alive in the densest firebombing in the war. The reason they didnt drop atom bombs on Tokyo was that it was already destroyed by then. 180,000 died in total and the dead choked the streets and rivers, where thousands sought refuge.















The next 'blossom of Edo' is the 80 year cycle Big One Quake, that is now at least 4 years overdue

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Old August 1st, 2007, 02:31 PM   #75
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there are places where war, flood, and political upheaval are put aside and wood built buildings can survive - villages and county towns. Basically , go on google Earth and you can check out thousands upon thousands of old style Chinese villages, so many of them it would be impossible for UNESCO to list them all (though its started on the watertowns around Shanghai). Its also interesting to note new housing that goes up here are still in the old style. When I returned to my ancestral village in Hainan most of the houses were old style, but to my amzament found out most of them had been built in the last 2 years. Many buildings in this part of the country are stone and brick to withstand typhoons:



200 year old street, mixed with new houses - all identical


detail above a window on a new house. Magpies, that mate for life, are the symbol for newly weds



Of the largest tracts of old architecture, Lijiang would be the largest contiguous with over a million residents:







of the big 10 million+ cities crowded wityh highrises, Nanjing and Chengdu still have large tracts of traditional architecture too, Nanjing with endless main temple complexes and palaces (over 100), and leafy backstreets, while Chengdu not only has its old style houses and teahouse culture, but still builds new buildings in traditional materials:

new:





old:





teahouses



Last edited by the spliff fairy; August 1st, 2007 at 03:52 PM.
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Old August 4th, 2007, 01:29 PM   #76
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Istana Jahar, Kota Baharu, Malaysia
Currently known as the Museum of Royal Traditions and Customs, Istana Jahar was a token from Sultan Mahmud II to his grandson, Long Kundur in 1800.

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Old August 6th, 2007, 01:19 AM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
Istana Jahar, Kota Baharu, Malaysia
Currently known as the Museum of Royal Traditions and Customs, Istana Jahar was a token from Sultan Mahmud II to his grandson, Long Kundur in 1800.

Just curious... Do you know what is the function of the pedestal of 6 pillars...it is really beautiful!!
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Old August 6th, 2007, 03:47 PM   #78
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Oooh... looks almost like the cities I build in Emperor, RotMK:
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Old August 30th, 2007, 02:58 AM   #79
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Traditional Architecture / Islamic Architecture / Mausoleum Architecture of Pakistan

Courtesy: Bibi Jiwindi's Tomb - Uch Sharif (UrbanPk.coM)

Designed by: N/A
Status: Completed
Construction Date: N/A
Completion Date: 1494 A.D.
Client: N/A
Contractors: N/A
Building Type: Funerary
Building Usage: Mausoleum/Tomb/Tourist Spot
Height: N/A
Location: N/A

Description: N/A

Pix:

Introduction






Remaining Facade




















Facade Details - Motifs
















Rate It here: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=516913
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Old August 30th, 2007, 03:02 AM   #80
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Traditional Architecture / Islamic Architecture / Mausoleum Architecture of Pakistan

Courtesty: Necropolis of Chawkhandi (UrbanPk.com)


Designed by: N/A
Status: Completed
Construction Date: N/A
Completion Date: N/A
Client: N/A
Contractors: N/A
Building Type: Necropolis/Graveyard
Building Usage: Graveyard + Tourist Site
Height: N/A
No. of Blocks: N/A
Area: N/A
Location: Chawkhandi

Description:

Chaukandi Tombs are generally attributed to the Jokhio and Baloch tribes. They are located in the Sindh province and were built between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries. The word Chaukandi literally means "Four Corners". The tombs are built of yellow sandstone which was carried from Jung Shahi - a place near the city of Thatta. The most impressive tombs are the ones with pyramidal structure. The geometric designs that cover the entire surface of the tombs are extraordinary. The tombs of men are capped with a stylized turban and are carved with horses, arms and weapons. The tombs of women have been decorated with mostly jewelry, such as anklets, bracelets, necklaces, rings and earings.

Pix:












































Courtesy: Ayaz Asif
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