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Old August 24th, 2008, 01:32 PM   #261
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Originally Posted by Yappofloyd View Post

There is also that thing called hmmm how should I say, culture and heritage with the Tube. Dubai for all its glitz and big project hype is a bit sterile on both fronts and I expect the modern, spacious, automatic Dubai Metro to also be a bit the same.
damn the culture and heritage bull shit, if i am after that then i will go to a museum the system is creaky and gives so many people so much grief. The job of the tube is to transport efficiently, the london tube with striking threats, no aircon and expensive prices, do not meet the criteria. Yes it is better than nothing, and if was better then lot more people would use it and the busses instead of driving thier cars and clogging up the road and cause traffic jams. I see in your username that you are from Sudan, no wonder you like the tube.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 01:39 PM   #262
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Originally Posted by AltinD View Post
Malec, the primary reason for that is to send people to the Atlantis Hotel, not to serve the villa residents, which will always rely to their own luxury cars for moving around.
Well, they still have to find some way of getting from the metro to the monorail since there is no connection. Either that or get a taxi from the airport to atlantis
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Old August 24th, 2008, 01:43 PM   #263
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Originally Posted by rheintram View Post
As a Londoner, channel, you are should be aware of the age of the London underground. Take it into consideration when you judge and/or compare it with a modern system such as the one under construction in Dubai. And keep in mind that it will take any newly constructed system centuries to reach the density, length and ridership of Londons under- and overground system.
yeah, just the way Germany became a modern country after we left in rubble at the end of 2nd world war hostilities. Look at germany now, better in everything industrial, because they had a good start from a clean piece of paper. London still putting up and paying for outdated infrastructure same sentiment goes for Japan
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Old August 24th, 2008, 02:00 PM   #264
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malec View Post
Well, they still have to find some way of getting from the metro to the monorail since there is no connection. Either that or get a taxi from the airport to atlantis
I am not talking about the hotel guests, all hotels in Dubai offer Airport pick up/drop off either free or at some extra charge. I am talking about the residents/tourists who would go to the water park.

Anyway a 2 km extension of the monorail is already in the plans.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 06:13 PM   #265
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Originally Posted by AltinD View Post
This is the most ridiculous thing I have heard in a long time ... how far can people go with nonsense talk just to make themself feel better with what they have (or can't have).

It's a f*****g train to send you places for god sake, what "culture and herritage" has to do with it in any way.
Yes well fine if a train is just a thing to go from A to B for you. But I'm not talking about a train and neither is the point about a train. It is a about a mass transit system.

It is about how all the great metros in the world have their own unique character or culture, something which represents and symbolises that city and system. The use of urban space, how the metro interacts with the city and vice versa. No worries if you don't get that. Being an old metro, The Tube also has much heritage.

Now I for one would not rank the Tube as one of my favourite systems (being probably Tokyo, Madrid, Lyon, HK & BA) but I do recognise and appreciate the character of the Tube and what a great network it has. Of course everyone agrees that is needs upgrading and improvements (very gradual but even being in London 2 weeks ago I noticed many station upgrades). For all the understandable whinging of regular Tube users at least your not in a mega-cities like Bangkok, Jakarta or HCM which have little (BKK) or no metro (the rest).

Dubai will have a great metro system one day undoubtedly, I visit Dubai at least 4 times a year (in the last 5 yrs) & I was there 10 days ago, so I have been following the progress of plans and construction. However, you cannot compare it with the Tube as both systems are just completely different in scope and nature.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 06:24 PM   #266
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Originally Posted by channel View Post
I see in your username that you are from Sudan, no wonder you like the tube.
Mate, I really hope that this is not the extent of your analytical skills! If I was to apply the same logic for your username.........
Seriously, all the best for a strike and break down free week of Tube travelling.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 07:56 PM   #267
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From skdubai

[IMG]http://i35.************/1p9mw6.jpg[/IMG]


... yes, that's really an almost completed station.
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Old August 24th, 2008, 11:44 PM   #268
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Solaris* delivers 225 city buses to Dubai
http://www.venturasystems.nl/show.php?PID=9&AID=66&Nav=
http://www.transportweekly.com/pages...rticles/48377/
Solaris Bus & Coach has won in a public tender for the delivery of 225 city buses of the Dubai Roads & Transport Authority. Apart from the shipment, the contract includes the buses’ maintenance and service and has a total value of about 112 million Euro.

In fall last year, the Dubai transport company had issued a public tender for the delivery of 620 city buses.

In the end, the contracting entity decided to split the order. As a bottom line, Solaris Bus & Coach is to ship 225 buses to Dubai. The first part shipment is scheduled for November 2007, the final shipment for 2008. For the first five years, Solaris will also maintain and service the vehicles. A service station, operated by Polish Solaris staff until local workforce has been trained, is to be established at the site of the newly constructed fleet facility.

Among the 225 ordered buses, there are 150 articulated Solaris Urbino 18 and 75 Solaris Urbino 12 city buses. Due to the specific climatic and cultural conditions, the buses to be shipped to the Arab Emirates will feature a great number of special solutions. Among other things, all buses will feature a so-called family zone. The area between the first and the second door will, form a family compartment for women and children. All inscriptions in the buses, including the instrument panel, will be bi-lingual - Arab and English. Also, all vehicles are going to be equipped with a video surveillance system.


*
Solaris Bus & Coach

http://www.solarisbus.pl/en/
http://www.solarisbus.pl/en/urbino,gallery.html

Solaris Bus & Coach S.A. is a bus, coach and trolleybus manufacturer based in Bolechowo and Środa Wielkopolska, near Poznań, Poland.
Solaris produced the first European bus model using hybrid technology, the Solaris Urbino 18 Hybrid. That hybrid model was ordered a few months ago by the Polish city of Poznań.










solaris urbino 18 for Dubai :
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Old August 25th, 2008, 12:34 AM   #269
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Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
since you're in phoenix, you could possibly explain the pitfalls of having a large and quickly expanding city in the otherwise inhospitable desert?
Let me first say (as a resident of a desert) that deserts are not inhospitable. The only way (for people that are not native of an “extreme” climate) to live in such a place is to adapt and adjust to the climate. You also have to accept the climate. But each climate of the world can be inhabited since they are all hospitable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
people have argued that dubai, like phoenix or other extremely hot (or cold, as in the case of calgary, etc.) cities are disproportionately car dependent because of the uncomfortable temperatures. yet this doesn't explain why other miserably hot cities (hong kong, singapore, etc.) do not have the same levels of automobile dependence.
Climate does not automatically determine the development of cities, but it can affect it (whether good or bad). But there are many examples throughout the world which show that the local climate does not hinder the development of a city. See below.

I personally think the main reason Phoenix and Dubai are such low-density cities that are highly dependent on the private car is due to when they developed. When the car did not exist, people had to live close to the urban centre so they can have access to amenities and their places of occupation. With the car, people can live far away from a city (or their workplace) and still have easy access to all the amenities.

Phoenix used to be a very small city. After World War II, there was a large population boom. People were able to live away from the urban centre because the car was more accessible to the average person (due to cost) and cars were highly desirable due to their social status. The result of a large population increase along with high rates of car ownership can be seen today. Phoenix has one of the lowest densities in the United States (and therefore probably the world). The downtown area suffers a lot (even McDonald’s had to close its only downtown store due to low sales) since there are multiple business and commercial centres scattered throughout the metropolitan area (this is the polycentric model to which Rheintram referred). There are signs that the downtown will improve greatly in the coming years, but there are still problems.

This is all a result of low density and car dependence. Both are also prevalent in Dubai.

Of course, we cannot analyze Dubai as much because the city is so new and it is growing so fast. Once the growth slows will we be able to fully understand Dubai’s development pattern and understand the results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by malec View Post
However those cities don't reach 50 degrees Celsius. Do you know how hot that is?
It is like stepping into a sauna every time you go outside. The wind burns your face. You sweat like a pig within 2 minutes, and so on.
Well actually none of those cities reach 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit) on an average day. The highest average high temperature in Dubai is 44 C (111 F).(Source) And the highest average high temperature in Phoenix is 42 C (107 F). Of course day to day temperatures can be much higher. Also, humidity can make it feel warmer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by particlez View Post
^not that it's immediately pertinent to this discussion, but using 'hot weather' as a justification for automobile dependency is a pet peeve of mine. a comfortable, mediterranean climate is NOT a prerequisite for urbanism.

granted, things like streetside cafes won't work in dubai, and its hot climate will force dubai to have different aesthetics from what many self-righteous architecture hacks associate with urbanism. but people confuse temperate european streetside aesthetics with urbanism. thus you get car-dependent yet aesthetically pleasing 'lifestyle' centers being touted as the answer to contemporary north american sprawl. it's silly, but people buy into it. inhospitable climates may require skywalks and underpasses and a dense, efficient PT system. but if they are implemented (and there is ample evidence to indicate that they will) dubai will escape the problems of the car.
I agree with the idea that “a comfortable, mediterranean climate is NOT a prerequisite for urbanism.” Urbanism can flourish in any part of the world, as long as it is done correctly. I will expand on this issue below

But, I disagree with the idea that “streetside cafes won’t work in dubai.” Again, I will expand on this below.


-------


Now I want to go in-depth and look at cities that are all located in desert and desert-like climates. Each of these cities had to deal with the issues of heat, sun, and water. They are old cities and therefore their models have succeeded and sustained a population for a long time. These cities should be used a model for Dubai and other desert cities around the world.

Many people say that cities located in extreme climates cannot have a vibrant pedestrian culture. They also say that such cities cannot benefit from public transportation because the climate will deter people from going outdoors to access the transport.

Well, they are wrong. There are many cities located in extreme climates that have a thriving outdoor scene.

Look at Cairo:


by Zuikutis at IgoUgo


by Matt at Picasa

While temperatures are about 10 degrees Celsius (15 degrees Fahrenheit) lower than in Dubai during the summer, many people would still consider Cairo to be warm. People walk around regardless of how hot it is.

Baghdad:


by Matanski at Blogspot

Baghdad also has a very similar climate during the summer months as Dubai does. The average high in Baghdad during July is 43 C (109 F).

While Jerusalem (Al Quds) has a much colder climate during the summer (around 30 C (85 F) as the average high), it is located in what many would consider a desert-like climate. There is a long history in Jerusalem and the Old City is the ideal place for the pedestrian climate:


by Chris Brooks

But there is no reason to actually show such examples because Dubai itself does have a thriving pedestrian scene.


by Imre Solt

image hosted on flickr

From Flickr

The above examples clearly show that dense, pedestrian-based cities (or at least districts) can thrive in warm climates. To help the situation, the density creates shade that cools the area down. The close proximity of stores, offices and community centres in these dense areas mean people do not have to walk far. So, even if the shade is not working to stop the heat, people do not have to walk a long distance to reach their destinations. Public transportation can support the density to transport people across the city. As luv2bebrown mentioned, dense areas have a lot of traffic and congestion. The bus and/or subway network will make getting around such a city even easier.

Particlez said that “a comfortable, mediterranean climate is NOT a prerequisite for urbanism.” The examples of Cairo, Baghdad, Jerusalem and Dubai show that Particlez is correct. There can still be bustling pedestrian streets, regardless of the climate.

But, Particlez said that outdoor cafés cannot work in warm climates. This is wrong. You could build outdoor courtyards with shade. Sinking the courtyard so the ground is about a metre below the surrounding area could also help cool the area down even more.

While I am not sure about the elevation of the Basta Art Café, in Dubai, I believe it is very popular:


From TripAdvisor

image hosted on flickr

by Anilegna of Flickr

Outdoor cafés in warm areas can be successful. But, they have to be done correctly.

There are many other warm cities throughout the world where sprawl and cars do not play a role in the city’s development pattern. Some warm cities may have urbanism due to age, economics or topography. But, they all share the important common characteristic of being warm cities.

Therefore, we can come to the clear conclusion that Dubai and Phoenix are not car-dependent cities due to the climate and temperatures. The reasons are much more involved and specific. And therefore it is not an issue to discuss at this very moment.

If we want to look at the density of cities and not the pedestrian scene (even though they do feed off each other), then Shibam is a perfect example. This city in Yemen is very compact and is considered to have the world’s first high-rises.


by Jialiang Gao


by fallschirmhosen at IgoUgo

If Dubai tried to mimic city structures in the above cities and truly worked for a dense, vibrant city, then there could be a possibility that the public transportation will succeed, no matter what. The density and pedestrian culture of Dubai will naturally support the network. People will ride the bus or Metro from one part of the city to the other. When they get off, they will be able to easily walk to their eventual destination.

The future of public transportation in Dubai has nothing to do with the climate or temperature. It has everything to do with density, and pedestrian-friendly areas.

If I have made an error in the above post (typos and incorrect information/data), please let me know and I will attempt to address the issue. Thanks.
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Old September 2nd, 2008, 02:37 AM   #270
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NEW LINES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Dubai to tender Palm Deira metro deal
Published: 29 August 2008 16:23 GMT Author: Colin Foreman More by this Author Last Updated: 31 August 2008 14:00 Reader Responses

Dubai Metro: Tenders are being issued for two further lines of the transport system

Consultancy contract covers design of two metro lines and tram system costing $4bn in total.

Dubai's Roads & Transport Authority (RTA) is preparing to issue tender documents for a consultancy contract to design two metro lines and a tram system serving Palm Deira. The three lines will cost a total of about AED15bn ($4bn).

The two metro lines will connect Palm Deira with the Red and Green lines, which are already under construction. The third line will follow a circular route, connecting the main islands of the offshore development.

The first metro line, the Black line, will connect the trunk of Palm Deira with the Union Square station in the Deira area of the city.

The station is already being built as an interchange for the Red and Green lines.

The new line will now provide connections to Palm Deira for passengers travelling on the other two lines from Dubai International Airport or from residential and commercial areas along Sheikh Zayed road.

The other metro route, the Orange line, will run in a loop across several of Palm Deira's islands and link to the Abu Heil and Ghubeibah stations on the Green line.

The proposed tram system, the Magenta line, will only serve Palm Deira, connecting the main islands of the project.


The feasibility study and outline design of these projects was prepared as part of the integrated transport masterplan for Palm Deira. It was conducted by the Out and About in Palm Deira consortium, made up of MVA, Systra and Sogreah, all of France, and Royal Haskoning of The Netherlands.

The rail projects are the latest of several transportation schemes being developed to serve Palm Deira. In early August, Dubai-based Nakheel, developer of the project, appointed UK-based Hyder Consulting and LWK Architects to design bridges on Palm Deira. The contract involves preparing the architectural concept for 44 long-span bridges that will connect the 26 islands that make up the development (MEED 13:8:08).

Earlier this year, the local/Belgian Bel Hasa Six Construct was awarded a AED300m contract by the RTA to build an access bridge connecting Palm Deira to the mainland. The bridge will be 400 metres long with six lanes in each direction.

Transportation has been a major concern for Palm Deira since it was launched in 2004. Unlike Palm Jumeirah and Palm Jebel Ali, which are being built away from the centre of the city, Palm Deira will connect to the mainland at one of the oldest and most congested areas of Dubai.

R
It's basically this:




I think some big things needed are:

-High-speed rail linking all emirates (and other countries as well), that doesn't carry only passangers.
-Sharjah get off their asses and cooperate with Dubai to get some proper transport between the two.
-More lines to serve various areas in dubai, and also provide more connections. Example is the one going from palm deira could be extended to deira or bur dubai for example.
-Tram line to maritime city, this place will have high towers in a small area.
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Old September 7th, 2008, 05:44 AM   #271
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Taking the bus gets more popular in Dubai
Staff Report
05 September 2008, 23:12

Dubai: One and a half million more bus rides have been taken in Dubai this year as compared to last year, the Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) announced on Friay.

Statistics compiled by the RTA revealed that public buses operated by the Public Transport Agency served 47 million passengers in more than 981,000 trips on 70 routes since the start of this year.

During the same time last year, 45.5 million passengers were served, which indicates a rise in bus ridership of 1.5 million.

Abdullah Yousuf Al Ali, director of the Buses Department at the RTA's Public Transport Agency, stated that the Agency is currently engaged in developing an integrated plan to upgrade the level of services provided by public buses. "This is envisaged in inaugurating a number of new buses, such as articulated and double-decker ones, which will enable us to cover 95 per cent of Dubai urban area in less than three years."

"We will also be introducing state-of-the-art inter-city buses to link the emirate of Dubai with Abu Dhabi, as well as Sharjah, Ajman, Umm Al Quwain, Ras Al Khaimah and Fujairah. Other key cities such as Al Ain, Al Dhaid, Masafi and Jebel Ali will also be covered," he added.

Last year, the RTA issued tenders for supplying 620 buses, including 170 double-decker buses, 300 articulated buses and 150 standard buses, he said. It is anticipated that RTA will take delivery in March 2009.
http://archive.gulfnews.com/articles.../10242902.html
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Old September 7th, 2008, 05:48 AM   #272
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More Pick-up Points Sought on Sharjah-Dubai Bus Route
Joy Sengupta
6 September 2008

DUBAI - A large number of people travelling everyday from Sharjah to Dubai in public buses, have requested the Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) to increase the number of pick-up points along the route.

They say that they have to struggle through the traffic Sharjah to reach the bus stations.

At present, people can catch a bus to Dubai from the Al Jubail Bus station in Sharjah.

These buses only leave the station once they are full and don’t stop anywhere until they reach the bus stations in Dubai.

However, while coming to Sharjah from Dubai, these buses stop at some locations like Al Nahda (near Ansar Mall), King Faisal Street etc.

Reaction to requests on the matter, officials of Public Transport Agency (PTA) have urged the public to identify the areas where the buses could stop to pick up passengers.

Salim Mohammed Qasim, who lives in the Al Nahda area in Sharjah, said, “In the Al Nahda area, getting a taxi to Dubai is impossible during the morning hours. My only option is a bus ride for which I have to travel all the way to the Al Jubail bus station. For this, I have to start from my home very early as the roads are crowded and catching a cab is a difficult deal. The RTA must consider some more pick-up points other than the bus station in Sharjah, for the benefit of the commuters.”

“An increase in the pick-up points will really help us. I live in the Al Tawoun area where there are very few taxis. In order to reach my work place by 9am, I have to leave home by 6am. Reaching the bus station in Sharjah is so difficult in the morning. We request the RTA to help us,” added Prashantha Dharmanathan, who works in a real estate office on Shaikh Zayed Road.

Earlier, the RTA had said that it was planning to increase the number of pick-up and drop-off points between Dubai and Sharjah.

When contacted, Abdullah Yousuf Al Ali, Director of Public Bus Department, said people were free to contact the RTA in this connection.

“At present, there are a few drop-off points for passengers coming to Sharjah from Dubai. If there are a large number of people of one particular area who are facing this problem, they are free to contact the RTA and place a suggestion through the RTA web site or even by calling us. Once it is done, the matter will be forwarded to the Planning Section who will conduct a study on the issue. If found feasible, we will implement it. The RTA is presently thinking of a lot of things in order to improve the services,” he pointed out.
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayA...ptember143.xml
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Old September 8th, 2008, 08:12 PM   #273
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Haha, Sharjah residents asking for a more convinient service offered by Dubai authorities.
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Old September 9th, 2008, 11:45 PM   #274
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lol no choice, not like Sharjah is going to do anything about it in the next decade or so....
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Old September 17th, 2008, 03:28 AM   #275
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All Systems Gear up for Dubai Metro’s Official Test Run This Month
Joy Sengupta
17 September 2008

DUBAI — With the ‘official’ test run of the Dubai Metro slated to take place any time this month, Abdul Majid Al Khaja, CEO of the Rail Agency at the Roads and Transport Authority (RTA), said the track from Jebel Ali to Rashidiya was ready for use.

He said that nearly 500 metres of Metro tracks were being laid everyday. The official also said that 90 per cent work on the Red Line of the Dh15.5 billion project was complete.

The Red Line of Dubai Metro will cover Shaikh Zayed Road, Jebel Ali, BurJuman, Union Square, up to the Dubai International Airport, and will start in September next year.

Khaja said that work on the Green Line too was 60 per cent complete. He added that four Metro trains are arriving every month in the emirate from Japan.

While the fare between two stations is expected to be less than Dh10, the charges will be different for different classes, Khaja told Khaleej Times.

Each train of the Dubai Metro will consist of three classes, namely the Golden Class, Women and Children Class, and Silver Class.

“The actual fares will be announced within a month,” the official said.

The Metro trains are being subjected to short test runs almost every day.

“From the moment they arrive, the trains are being subjected to intensive testing. The official test run on the 11.4km track from Jebel Ali underground terminal to Ibn Battuta station will happen any time this month,” he said.
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayA...section=theuae
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Old September 17th, 2008, 02:41 PM   #276
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goooooooooooo dubai!
2005 i was in dubai and i was thinking this city needs metro!
i was in sharja and everyday the same pronlems getting to dubai!
as an iranian i support progress in dubai!its our littlle sister!
many iranians living there!
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Old September 21st, 2008, 02:15 PM   #277
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Dubai Metro: Full Steam Ahead



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Old September 21st, 2008, 02:17 PM   #278
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Dubai Metro trial operation held
by Dylan Bowman, 21 September 2008

A trial operation of Dubai's metro was held on Saturday as the emirate's first mass transit system took another step towards completion.

A train ran for 11km between Jebel Ali Station and Ibn Battuta Mall Station, starting its trial run at a speed of 30 km/h and accelerating up to 90 km/h, state news agency WAM reported.

The train on trial consisted of five coaches that can carry up to 643 passengers.

The trial was held in the presence of Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, also UAE vice president and prime minister.

Also on Saturday Sheikh Mohammed commissioned the metro's internet wireless service (Wi-Fi), which will covers all Red Line and Green Line trains, WAM reported.

The service, provided by Du, will allow passengers to use their laptops while riding on the trains.

Once completed, the 15.5 billion-dirham ($4.22 billion) Dubai Metro will be the world's largest automated driverless metro system, with Green and Red lines extending 75 kilometres and consisting of 47 stations, including 10 underground stations.

Link to the article
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Old September 21st, 2008, 02:30 PM   #279
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From Gulf News







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I can cheat you blind.

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Old September 23rd, 2008, 01:46 PM   #280
skdubai
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hyderabad/Dubai
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I used the public buses after nearly 7-8 years yesterday and realised just why i stopped using them in the first place and wished i could go back and get my car from the service center!!!!!

It is gonna take a miracle to pry me away from my car after yesterday's torturous journey!!!!
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