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Old May 16th, 2011, 07:21 AM   #641
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Toronto's density plan is just fascinating...
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Old May 17th, 2011, 06:51 AM   #642
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8 Gladstone by Streetcar Developments, Toronto

http://www.8gladstone.com/flash.php

Music is pretty catchy

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Old May 17th, 2011, 06:58 AM   #643
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The music sounds like crazyfrog. That's a decent development though. Should spruce up the area.
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Old May 19th, 2011, 04:34 PM   #644
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The 2nd phase of Onni's Fort York development in Toronto's Waterfront:

The Yards at Fort York, 28 storeys

http://urbantoronto.ca/database/proj...ards-fort-york

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Old May 19th, 2011, 04:34 PM   #645
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http://blog.mycondomylife.com/cityze...architect.html

Foster + Partners Chosen as Lead Architect for Toronto Waterfront Project

Quote:
We at Cityzen Developments are very excited today to be able to announce that following a comprehensive international search, renowned firm Foster + Partners has been selected to serve as lead architect on our new Toronto waterfront project.

"This is a further signal of our efforts to lead by design,” says our principal Sam Crignano “Foster + Partners are among the very elite of architects in the world today."

Castlepoint Realty’s Alfredo Romano sees bringing Foster + Partners here as a "huge win for the City of Toronto and the Waterfront. It’s a game changer."

A joint venture of award winning architects Peter Clewes of Architects Alliance, Bruce Kuwabara of KPMB of Toronto, and Landscape Architect Claude Cormier of Montreal complete the Design Team.

Led by Foster + Partners, the design team and 3C Lakeshore Inc. (a joint venture between Cityzen Development Group, Castlepoint Realty Partners of Toronto and Continental Ventures Realty of New York) are meeting this week in London to start the process of designing a vibrant neighborhood on Toronto’s waterfront.

Subsequent design sessions are scheduled for both Toronto and New York and newly minted plans will be unveiled later this year.

"The Waterfront represents a special opportunity for Toronto’s growth. We are elated to have Foster + Partners lead in designing this exciting new neighborhood and our first venture in Canada," states Jane Gol of New York's Continental Ventures Realty.
At over 13 acres, the 3C site is the largest contiguous tract of land on Toronto’s East Bayfront. Zoned for 2.5 million square feet of residential, retail, hotel, entertainment and cultural uses; it is also the single largest development project in downtown Toronto.

Very exciting times ahead! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to be kept in the loop on all the latest developments!
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Old May 20th, 2011, 02:32 AM   #646
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159 Wellesley Street East, 38 storeys

Quote:
Originally Posted by Loozrboy on UrbanToronto View Post
Just walked by and noticed they have a development proposal sign up... I wish I'd taken a close-up of the rendering, but I assumed I'd be able to find it on the city web site. Alas, I cannot.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/loozrboy/5737808841/

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Closeup shot that I got from that development board.

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Last edited by Travis007; May 21st, 2011 at 06:31 AM.
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Old May 23rd, 2011, 05:03 PM   #647
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A guilty conscience stifles good urban design



The appearance of the average tall Toronto building these days is the result of several forces, the least powerful of which is architectural imagination.

Too often, an architect is called in by the developer merely to put some decorative touches on a structure whose shape and size have already been determined by the economic bottom line and civic bylaws, and sometimes by the demands of the heritage people at city hall. With the contemporary building art so frequently marginalized, it’s no wonder that boomtown Toronto has few new towers that are architecturally memorable. (I try to keep you posted in this column on the ones that are worth thinking about.)

There is probably nothing to be done to relieve the market and regulatory pressures that are keeping Toronto’s condominium unit-sizes too small and the towers blockish and ill-proportioned. But surely we could become more sensible and discerning when it comes to the preservation of what’s valuable in our built inheritance.

The late real-estate entrepreneur Paul Oberman, and the numerous recent converters of Hogtown’s sturdy old warehouses and factories into attractive residential lofts, have shown the right way forward in the field of architectural conservation. Mr. Oberman, for his part, fervently believed and practised a development philosophy that entailed updating historic edifices for modern commercial use. Loft conversion by other developers has saved many elderly industrial buildings from the wrecker’s ball.

Which leaves us with the extensive Victorian and Edwardian urban fabric for which no new use can be found. What’s to be done with such fabric, especially when it covers sites that are ready for the kind of downtown residential intensification Toronto needs?

I came across city officialdom’s all-too-typical answer to this question last week, when I reviewed a high-rise condominium project slated to go up at the corner of Sherbourne Street and King Street East.

Designed by Toronto architect Prishram Jain, founder and principal of TACT Architecture Inc., this 18-storey complex is an example of urban infill that quietly conforms to market conditions and city rules. Its creator does not want to knock anyone’s socks off, artistically speaking, and the 132-unit building surely won’t do so. If there is one interesting thing about the glass, brick and steel tower, it’s the prominent lid Mr. Jain has dropped on top, crisply stopping the upward movement of the King Street façade.

It’s at the bottom, not the top, that this project has a creative problem – one caused by public officials far too worried about salvaging every last brick and stick from Toronto’s Victorian layout.

Since 1867, a three-storey buff brick building that once housed the Grand Central Hotel has stood on the corner to be occupied by Mr. Jain’s tower. The structure, at various points in its 144-year career, has also sheltered a tavern, a nightclub and, most recently, lawyers’ offices.

This instance of routine nineteenth-century commercial construction has no architectural significance that I can make out. But before being demolished, it probably deserves to be photographed and otherwise documented, inside and out, so that future researchers can reconstruct the ways our Victorian ancestors put Toronto’s ordinary buildings together.

Most of the old hotel – all of its interior, that is – will indeed be ripped out to make way for the tower. But two of its four facades, the ones abutting Sherbourne Street and King Street East, are to remain standing, by decree of city council on the recommendation of the city’s heritage bureaucracy. The crumbling masonry of these old faces, Mr. Jain told me, will be repaired with brick taken from the two exterior walls the city has allowed the developer to tear down.

The result of these moves will likely be a curious architectural creature, neither fish nor fowl, and one that may, alas, help define a baleful 21st century tall-building style in Toronto: a sleek modernist tower rising from a streetside clutter of Victorian bric-a-brac.

This is sentimentality, not good urban design. It means leaving crucial decisions in the crafting of every contemporary tall building – how it will hit the ground, how it will respond to sidewalks and streets in the modern city – up to the 19th century.

And it means trying to salve our bad civic conscience – scarred by allowing the destruction of so many genuinely important Toronto buildings in the past – by letting ghosts determine what living architects can do, as they go about fashioning a livable city for future generations.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/...rticle2011027/
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Old May 26th, 2011, 11:37 AM   #648
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I agree it's quite a boring building, but still it gives a certain atmosphere to the area.

Why destroy it only for the reason of being boring?
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Old May 27th, 2011, 11:09 AM   #649
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St. Clair streetcar project brings surprise good news for drivers
Controversial project ended up creating 75 on-street parking spots
25 May 2011
The Toronto Star

A major criticism of the St. Clair streetcar project was that it would destroy street parking along the avenue.

Today, there are 75 more street parking spaces than before.

Councillor Joe Mihevc (Ward 21, St. Paul's) credited the increase to a couple of tweaks in designing the 6.8-kilometre dedicated line from Yonge St. to west of Keele St.

Moving fire hydrants freed up space to park cars. Pedestrian barriers were installed at streetcar stops, which allowed more cars to park at curbside.

"It's an inside baseball sort of thing but at signalized intersections, we've added 10 spots. Just like that," Mihevc said.

A report by city transportation staff says street parking has increased to 375 on-street spots from 300 before construction began six years ago.

And the city-owned Toronto Parking Authority has added 61 off-street spaces in new Green P lots.

Mihevc said it's time for opponents of the $106 million project to tone down their criticisms.

"Mayor Ford, it's time to stop dumping on St. Clair," he said. "It's turning out to be one of the beautiful, grand avenues in the city."

Since the line was finally completed last year, the street has been changing for the better, Mihevc said.

The positive developments that he noted include:

More people walking the street.

Applications for new developments.

More and more patios.

Businesses improving their storefronts.

"Last year, I had seven new patio licences," he said. "It's a happening place. It's moseying down the street, having a gelato, sitting down having a beer. That's very St. Clair now."

With the changes to the street, motorists are slowing down, he added. "The days of doing 60 to 80 km/h on St. Clair are over. It's 40 to 50 km/h now but it moves because the lights are timed."

But the street remains a headache during rush hour because there is only one traffic lane in each direction, according to Councillor Josh Matlow (Ward 22, St. Paul's).

Matlow said the parking authority should be encouraged to add even more off-street spaces.

"There is a dearth of parking in this area, there has been for a long time," Matlow said.

Over time, it might be possible to remove street parking to aid rush hour traffic, he said.

The staff report on the parking goes to Wednesday's meeting of the Toronto-East York community council.
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Old May 27th, 2011, 06:54 PM   #650
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http://concordadex.com/parkplace/tango2/

Tango Phase 2

Posted initially by Solaris on UrbanToronto

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Old May 27th, 2011, 09:22 PM   #651
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40 Scott St., 58s
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Images provided by UT Member "Atlantis"
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Old May 27th, 2011, 09:51 PM   #652
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arrrgh View Post
I agree it's quite a boring building, but still it gives a certain atmosphere to the area.

Why destroy it only for the reason of being boring?
I agree, but that photo above doesn't properly represent the dilemma facing Toronto. The dominant built form consists of 2-4 floor blue collar housing, most of which is very modest. If we preserve all of it, we hamstring the city and impose 19th century design constraints on a 21st century city.

Toronto is bursting at the seams and needs modern day solutions when it comes to its built form. The article isn't calling for an end to preservation, it's suggesting that we're making bad decisions due to guilt over some gems that were destroyed in the name of progress. We're attempting to save everything when often we need to accept that sometimes redevelopment makes the most sense.

The preservation in the photo depicted looks good, but there are many examples in Toronto where we really need to start from scratch.
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Old May 29th, 2011, 12:08 AM   #653
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Posted by urbandreamer on UrbanToronto

Axiom, 424-460 Adelaide Street East, 17 & 19 st

http://www.toronto.ca/planning/pdf/d...es_march29.pdf

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Old May 29th, 2011, 12:37 AM   #654
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Dated and ugly.
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Old June 7th, 2011, 06:48 PM   #655
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Posted by Ed007Toronto on UrbanToronto:



Quote:
For Immediate Release

Contemporary design takes root in The Beach with Lakehouse

June 7, 2011...Toronto – Adding a new contemporary la1nguage to The Beach, Lakehouse Beach
Residences is settling into one of Toronto’s most established neighbourhoods.

Architecture studio RAW has created a striking yet intimate condominium that presents
floating glass enclosures of increasing size one inside the other. Contemporary glass walls
are surrounded by smaller elements of masonry brick and IPE wood that mimic the scale and
character of The Beach neighbourhood.

“While design forward, Lakehouse settles into the neighbourhood quite well,” says Andrew
Brethour, Toronto real estate expert and President of PMA Brethour.

Tucked cleverly on the corner of Kenilworth Ave. and Queen Street East, Lakehouse represents a
decidedly urban and design forward alternative to traditional condo living. “Rather than replace
the existing fabric with a high rise development, Lakehouse adds density while preserving the
context of its surroundings,” says Shane Fenton, VP of Reserve Properties.

Reserve’s keen ability to acquire highly desirable locations on some of the city’s hottest streets
has allowed them to develop a reputation for forward thinking urban mainstreet projects. From
the sell-out success of Bellefair, which converts a former church in the heart of The Beach, to
Motif Lofts and Towns on trendy Ossington Ave., and several others in the pipeline, the blended
intuition of Reserve Properties’ father-son team is changing the landscape of Toronto.

“We enjoy working together and bringing our combined passion to the neighbourhoods we
work in,” says Shelley Fenton, President, Reserve Properties.

In keeping with the spirit of The Beach, Lakehouse suites feature some of the largest outdoor
living spaces in the city with grand luxurious terraces and wrap around balconies up to 1058 sq.
ft., creating a seamless blend of indoor and outdoor living space. Lakehouse’s modern structure
allows for terraces on upper floors to be set back and framed, “to feel more like outdoor
rooms,” says Roland Rom Colthoff, Director, RAW.

Lakehouse interiors are tailored for the refined tastes and individual styles of The Beach
homeowner. In a neighbourhood where every front porch stands out from the next, Lakehouse
offers 16 unique spacious floor plans in a boutique residence of only 28 units.

With one and two bedroom open concept floor plans ranging from 550 sq. ft. - 1880 sq.
ft., contemporary high-end Interiors by II by IV Design Associates include; Scavolini kitchen

cabinetry with integrated and stainless steel European appliances by AEG and Leibherr,
bathrooms featuring luxurious deep soaker bathtubs and frameless glass showers. Balconies and
terraces all feature gas BBQ connections.

“We know from our last project Bellefair, that the majority of purchasers are from the
community. So we designed everything about Lakehouse for the people who want to live in The
Beach,” says Shane Fenton.

Echoing the residential greenery that surrounds it, Lakehouse residents are welcomed to their
lakeside home with a soft landscaped promenade leading to an intimate entrance on Kenilworth
Ave. Lakehouse also boasts enhanced retail along Queen Street East that opens up to the
neighbourhood’s vibrant mainstreet.

Priced from $349,000 to $1.4 million. Occupancy for Lakehouse is scheduled for November 2013.
The Lakehouse sales centre will open mid June and is located at 2000 Queen Street East. Hours
are Monday - Thursday 12 - 6 p.m., Saturday – Sunday 12-5 p.m.
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Old June 8th, 2011, 05:10 PM   #656
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Higher quality rendering for 159 Wellesley Street East posted by TheTorontoBlog, tipped by Urbanation:


http://thetorontoblog.com/2011/06/08...ey-sherbourne/



Quote:
Corner condo: Another condo tower has been proposed for the northeast downtown residential neighbourhood at Wellesley & Sherbourne Streets. This latest development proposal — a 326-unit, 38 -storey building with street-level retail space and four levels of underground parking — would rise on the southwest corner of Wellesley and Sherbourne, the former site of a Beaver gas station and Baker’s Dozen donut shop. It would be similar in height to two recently-constructed condo towers right across the street: Verve, just one block west at the corner of Wellesley Street and Homewood Avenue, and 500 Sherbourne, one block north at the corner of Sherbourne Street and Lourdes Lane. The site sits kitty-corner to St James Town, a densely-populated neighbourhood with nearly 20 rental apartment highrise buildings, and is just two blocks west of the popular Cabbagetown residential district.
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Old June 10th, 2011, 07:45 PM   #657
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From Urbanation's twitter page:

Quote:
Grand Metropolitan Homes (http://alturl.com/eb4cn) purchases future condo site at 844-850 Richmond St W, east of Strachan for $2.9 million.
Looks to be the location of this auto shops. It's across from a row of new modern townhomes (on the south side)



--------------------------------------



http://www.buzzbuzzhome.com/850-richmond-st

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Old June 10th, 2011, 08:07 PM   #658
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Fresh batch of Toronto proposal city reports:

(Links provided by urbandreamer on Twitter) http://twitter.com/#!/urban__dreamer

-15-35 Mercer Street (49 storeys, 153.2 m)
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38790.pdf

-124 and 128 Pears Ave (12 storeys, 40.4 m)
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38791.pdf

-875 Eglinton Ave W (11 storeys, 41 m)
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38792.pdf

-271 Front Street East and 25 Berkeley Street (20 storeys, 70.4 m and 57 storeys, 187.4 m ) http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38796.pdf

-501 to 521 Yonge Street (2 X 58 storeys, 192 m)
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38795.pdf

-40 Scott Street (58 storeys, 194.36 m)
http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2...file-38813.pdf
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Old June 24th, 2011, 05:29 PM   #659
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133 Hazelton

Rendering provided by ProjectEnd on UrbanToronto:

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Old June 24th, 2011, 05:30 PM   #660
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbandreamer on UrbanToronto View Post
431 RICHMOND ST W
Site Plan Approval 11 226036 STE 20 SA Ward 20
- Tor & E.York Jun 23, 2011 --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
SPA application to construct new 16 storey mixed use building with retail at grade, 209 residential units - 4 levels below grade parking - 85 residentail parking space
http://www.marketvisionrealty.com/la...nd_current.php

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