daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 11th, 2009, 02:13 PM   #321
Ŝróndeimr
Adventurous!
 
Ŝróndeimr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Trondheim, Norway
Posts: 12,221
Likes (Received): 2264

i don't know actually, but i guess demolition of the low-rises is starting very soon if it has not already.
Ŝróndeimr no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 11th, 2009, 09:33 PM   #322
toddhubert
Registered User
 
toddhubert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Guangzhou(Canton)\Coventry
Posts: 634
Likes (Received): 20

Quote:
Originally Posted by luci203 View Post
Wow, that's a huge lowrise area to be demolished... when will they start?
i think the government is negotiating with the residents, but demolishing should be started after the Asian Games
toddhubert no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 12th, 2009, 09:41 AM   #323
Joel que
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 474
Likes (Received): 41

watching CCN last night,focus on Guangzhou,among the news was "green" building -the pearl river tower being built in Guangzhou design by SOM.
according to spokewoman,the building is 5 times more expensive than traditional skyscraper,but it could get back all there investment within 5 years.
aside from pearl river tower,which is 50% finished,the entire area is gigantic construction site, several skyscraper under construction.
Joel que no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2010, 01:34 PM   #324
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Growth reaps a bitter harvest
10 January 2010
SCMP

Saleswoman Tang Xiaoqing's checklist includes taking potential buyers of flats on a Guangdong estate currently under construction to see a 1,200-hectare eco-park where they will be able to grow organic fruit and vegetables and catch fish if they become owners - or have management hire local farmers to do the job for them.

"It is a major selling point of our project. People are getting more and more health conscious, especially the well-off. They won't buy a property simply because we have a park for them to grow organic vegetables, but they will appreciate it."

Using an eco-park as a sweetener attracted the attention of Guangzhou Academy of Social Sciences researcher Peng Peng to the project, 60 kilometres northwest of Guangzhou's city centre. "This sales strategy just highlights how people in Guangdong do not trust the food they buy in the market because of the serious pollution, which has led to contamination of the agricultural land after decades of unchecked urbanisation and industrialisation," Peng said.

The pollution of arable land had led some middle-class people in Guangzhou and Shenzhen to rent farmland in remote rural areas and hire local farmers to grow organic vegetables for them, Peng said. They would eat only vegetables grown on their own land.

The trend represents a turning point in how the province, and the mainland as a whole, thinks about how to feed itself. A generation ago, most of the population were either farmers or ate food grown nearby. But the drive to industrialisation has put a huge strain on the mainland's farmland. The central government, concerned about food security, has set a minimum national level for the amount of arable land. But local authorities often find it hard to resist the lure of the developer's dollar, just as the dwindling number of farmers would prefer giving up toiling in the fields to take a payout or work in a factory. Such competing forces exist throughout the chain, and the stakes are high.

"The problem is very serious," said Wang Xiaoying, a professor at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences' rural development research institute. "The damage we are doing to agricultural land is permanent. Once concrete is poured on the soil, the land will not be able to revert back to farmland. The loss is forever."

The situation is especially severe in Guangdong. A Ministry of Lands and Resources report three years ago said the province was one of a few facing a severe shortage of grain and that problems with the supply of staple foods would last for a long time. A survey by the Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environment and Soil Sciences last year suggested heavy metals had contaminated about 40 per cent of the province's arable land, 10 per cent of that seriously.

The province's arable land produces only a third of the food that its population of more than 100 million people needs, according to the official Guangzhou Daily. Imports from other provinces account for 80 per cent of the shortfall, and the rest comes from overseas. Guangdong will need an extra five million acres to provide enough food for itself, according to one of Guangzhou's development research institutes.

The province used to play a major role in supplying vegetables and other staples to the nation, thanks to its abundant fertile land. The situation changed in the 1970s, when unprecedented industrialisation, urbanisation and population growth began. Huge swathes of farmland have been lost to factories, housing, highways and railway tracks. This has left the province with about 313 square metres of arable land per capita - a third the national average.

The city's changing landscape over the past 30 years illustrates the degree of urbanisation. Vegetable fields at Qingcai Gang (green vegetable knoll) have long been replaced by rows of low-rise housing. Standing on the former rice paddies of Tianhe are office towers, houses, banks and other businesses. Vegetables used to be grown on the site of the city's central business district, Zhujiang New City. Pantang in the city's west was home to fish ponds.

"Farmland used to be everywhere," said Chen Bingwu, a Guangzhou taxi driver. "Now I have no idea where we could possibly find farmland in Guangzhou. It has been replaced by factories and skyscrapers. With less and less farmland, how are we going to feed ourselves?"

Now Chen has to travel to Zhongluotan, 50 kilometres north of Qingcai Gang, before he finds any farmland. It is national policy that keeps agriculture alive in Zhongluotan; 800 hectares of arable land there is graded as prime land, which means it cannot be used for anything else.

Bu the pressure to build continues to intensify. Late last month, Guangzhou saw the highest price yet for a piece of land in the city. Guangzhou R&F teamed up with Agile Property Holdings and Country Garden to buy sites for Guangzhou Asian Games City for 25.5 billion yuan (HK$28.9 billion). The Panyu site is 4.38 million square metres, about 11 times the size of Cyberport in Pok Fu Lam, in Hong Kong. It is part of farmland the government took over in recent years to build venues for the Asian Games, to be held in November.

Beijing has vowed to keep at least 1.2 million square kilometres of arable land available for agriculture - the minimum needed to grow enough to feed the country. Of that, 1.04 million sq km should be prime land, and 1.05 million sq km should be growing grain by 2020. Grain yield should reach 525 tonnes per sq km. Efforts to increase grain output should include upgrading low-yield farmland, promoting technology, advancing agricultural mechanisation and strengthening the prevention of diseases and insect pests. Beijing also wants to improve agriculture infrastructure and water facilities.

A plan to take over farmland in Zhongluotan, near Guangzhou, was aborted some years ago, said 60-year-old vegetable farmer Zeng Hong, who owns a 4.5-hectare lot in the village. "It was some years ago. I was once told there are people interested in renting land from us to build something, but the plan was banned because the land here is not allowed to be used for development."

He is not against the idea of converting his farmland over to factory use. "Farming is a difficult job. I get up at 2 or 3 o'clock in the morning throughout the year. The vegetables are not worth that much money. If I could choose, I'd prefer to work in a factory where I can earn more money. As long as the price is reasonable, I have no problem letting them take my land."

For Zeng, reasonable means 100,000 yuan in a one-off compensation plus annual rent for using his land.

His neighbour Zeng Rong, who owns 1.2 hectares on which he grows vegetables, has a similar attitude. "I earn more working in factories in Guangzhou. But I'm too old now; I can't work in the factories any more. It is why I've come back. Farming is not bad, I have more freedom farming on my own land, but I can't get much money by growing vegetables."

For both Zengs, food security is an alien term they have not heard before and cannot comprehend. For them, farming is just about how much they will earn from it.

For Wang, the academy professor, the attitude of the two Zengs in indicative of why agricultural land is continually losing out to industrialisation. "It is difficult to stop local governments from converting arable land to urban land use. Their concern is economic development, not the nation's food security. Building factories and residential development are too lucrative to resist compared to the minimal revenue from agriculture. Food security is the central government's business."

Even though Guangdong has lost nearly all of its arable land, the central government has set targets for further urbanisation.

State Council guidelines for the development of the Pearl River Delta to the year 2020 requires the per capita gross domestic product of Guangdong to reach 80,000 yuan by 2012 and 135,000 yuan by 2020. The service industry should account for 53 per cent of the delta's economy by 2012 and 60 per cent by 2020. Guangdong's per capita GDP was 37,588 yuan in 2008, while contributions from the service sector amounted to less than 45 per cent of the economy. The blueprint also demands that hi-tech industry play a bigger role. To satisfy the demand for more development without violating the state's order to conserve agricultural land, Guangdong decided in 2000 to turn to less developed parts of the province - the east and the north. It pays farmers in the poor areas to open up more arable land in the mountainous areas, so developed areas can continue to expand.

Wang believes that although the government can turn to the poorer areas for extra arable land, yields are low. "The newly explored arable land is infertile land; farmers have to rely heavily on fertiliser for agricultural output. If soil is fertile and suitable for farming, the land has long been in agricultural use already."

The solutions are not easy. Wang suggests the best way to protect arable land is to increase the cost of land resumption by demanding local governments increase compensation to farmers. But there also needs to be a change in thinking.

The government should promote respect for agriculture but "changing thinking is very difficult", Wang said. "Since the country embarked on economic reform 30 years ago, the people deeply believe that without business, the economy will not be active, without industries, the people will not get rich, and without agriculture, the country will be unstable. Everyone wants to get rich, so no one wants to be a farmer and no one respects agriculture.

But not everyone shares his fears. "I'm not particularly worried about food security," Peng said. "We're living in a globalised time with clear division of labour. We earn money by producing manufactured goods; we can use the money we earn to buy food from other countries. Actually, Chinese companies are renting land in Serbia, Africa and South America to grow food for our consumption. I don't see any reason why we have to slow our urbanisation and industrialisation."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2010, 07:44 AM   #325
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Swire Properties Sees All Guangzhou Mall Leased Before Opening
21 January 2010

GUANGZHOU (Dow Jones)--Swire Properties Ltd., the property flagship of blue-chip Swire Pacific Ltd. (0019.HK) expects all the retail space at its Taikoo Hui commercial complex in Guangzhou to be pre-leased before the shopping mall opens later this year, an executive said Thursday.

More than 70% of Taikoo Hui's retail space has already been pre-leased, Gordon Ongley, chief executive of mainland China for Swire Properties, said at the development's topping out ceremony.

The 121,000-square-meter retail portion of the complex is scheduled to open before the 16th Asian Games in November.

The firm is in talks with potential tenants to lease 5%-10% of 90,000 square meters of office space, the first phase of the project, said Peter Kok, Taikoo Hui's general manager. The whole Taikoo Hui project will have office space of 164,000 square meters.

Investment in Taikoo Hui, which has a total gross floor area of 406,000 square meters, amounts to CNY5 billion. Swire Properties holds 97% of the complex and Guangzhou Daily News Group the remainder.

It is one of Swire Properties' four mainland projects. The company launched a Beijing commercial complex, The Village at Sanlitun, in 2008. It is also developing two commercial complexes in Beijing and Shanghai.

Ongley declined to comment on the progress of Swire Properties' proposed listing.

Swire Pacific has confirmed it appointed HSBC Holdings PLC, Goldman Sachs Group Inc., and Morgan Stanley as underwriters for the proposed spinoff.

People familiar with the situation have said the listing, which could raise around US$3 billion, is scheduled for May or June.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2010, 08:10 PM   #326
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Guangzhou to Build More High-tech Industrial Bases

GUANGZHOU, February 1, SinoCast -- The Guangzhou Municipal Development and Reform Commission lately disclosed a target proposed by the National Development and Reform Commission to build 100 national high-tech industrial bases within ten years, each with production value topping CNY 100 billion.

The bases will cover industries such as information, biology, aviation and aerospace, new material, and marine. Companies settling down in these bases will be encouraged to issue bonds and float shares on the capital market of Mainland China.

Under the guidance of the policy, Guangzhou will focus on the construction of four national high-tech industrial bases covering the fields of biology, software, information and new material, revealed an official of the Guangdong Science and Technology Department.

By far, the city has built a national software industrial base, a biology industrial base, an electronic information industrial base, an online game and animation industrial base, and an information service industrial demonstration park.

Currently, Guangzhou has 1,165 high-tech companies, including 23 that each has annual revenues of more than CNY 1 billion, and 208 with annual revenues of over CNY 100 million. The figure rose 27.78% and 45.45% from a year earlier respectively.

The city has worked out a plan to construct the Guangzhou Science City, the Tianhe Software Park, and the Huanghuagang Information Park. Its goal is to obtain information revenues surpassing CNY 330 billion, and information added value of more than CNY 120 billion in 2010.

Guangzhou's target for the new material industry is to boost the industrial production value by over 20% a year to CNY 90 billion in 2010, accounting for 7.4% of the city's total production value.

By then, Guangzhou's new material added value will hit CNY 20 billion, taking up 2.3% of the city's GDP. There will be more than 140 new material makers that each has annual sales revenues topping CNY 100 million, 23 with annual sales revenues of more than CNY 1 billion, and three with annual sales revenues of over CNY 10 billion.

Guangzhou's new material industry will center on the Guangzhou Development District, and include port-front industrial belt situated in districts of Huangpu, Panyu, and Nansha, and airport industrial belt located in districts of Baiyun and Huadu.

From 2010, Guangdong will put CNY 500 million in high-end projects within the territory of the Guangzhou Hi-tech Industrial Development Zone, making breakthroughs in the fields of electronic information, advanced manufacturing, biology and medicine, new material, renewable energy, and environmental protection, disclosed an official of the Guangdong Science and Technology Department.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2010, 08:38 PM   #327
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Guangzhou Airport Bonded Logistics Center Starts Operation
29 January 2010

GUANGZHOU, January 29, SinoCast -- The Guangzhou airport bonded logistics center just started operation in the southern Chinese transport hub of Guangzhou on January 28, becoming the first airport-based bonded logistics center in Guangdong Province.

It will make full use of its advantage in location, transport conditions, and industries to offer fairly effective and quality service, and strive to attract high-end logistics companies both at home and abroad. With its help, Guangzhou, of the province, is expected to grow into a logistics center in Asia.

Covering a total area of 300,000 square meters, the airport bonded logistics center is designed to have a starage area of 110,000 square meters. It gained approval from the General Administration of Customs, the Ministry of Finance, the State Administration of Taxation, and the State Administration of Foreign Exchange in December 2008.

Last November, the center passed the state acceptance. It has four parts, including an international distribution zone, an international procurement zone, an international transshipment zone, and an international express zone.

In addition, the center will mainly be engaged in international transshipment, distribution processing, bonded storage, export tax rebate, and other services.

With the rapid economic growth in China, the government has paid much attention to the construction of bonded ports. In December 2009, the Nansha Bonded Port came into operation in Guangzhou.

The bonded parrot is featured with nine major functions, which are storage and logistics, international transfer, international trade, produce showcase, testing and maintenance, processing and manufacturing, procurement and distribution, and port operation.

It is of grewat significance for companies in the central and western areas of the Pearl River Delta region to lower logistics costs and sharpen their core competitive edge. And it serves as a new platform for export-oriented companies in the area.

The first batch of companies settling down in the bonded area include logistics service providers, trade firms, and processing companies. They will offer services of VMI warehouse supply chain logistics management, international procurement and distribution, and processing trade.

The bonded area has formed a highly efficient transportation system. The waterway is 15.5 meters deep. It is available for 100,000-ton container carriers, previous reports said.

In June 2009, the Chongqing Bonded Port Zone kicked off construction, and as the first inland bonded port zone across China, it will be completed in three phase.

The first phase, with an approximate investment of CNY 3 billion, will set up iron networks, measuring 14.5 kilometers in length, around an area of 2.67 square kilometers.

The second and third phases are scheduled to be completed by 2012 and 2015, respectively, and at that time, the bonded port zone will greatly speed up the economic growth in Chongqing and surrounding regions.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 4th, 2010, 10:15 AM   #328
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Construction of Asian Games venues 'clean'
29 January 2010
Copyright 2010 China Daily Information Company. All Rights Reserved.

No foul play has been uncovered in the construction of the sports facilities for the upcoming Asian Games, organizers said on Jan 28 in Guangzhou.

Local people's congress deputies had requested the transparent publication of how funds were used in the venues' construction for the 2010 Asian Games. In response, the Guangzhou Games organizing committee said in a press announcement that the bids, design and construction of the sport venues have been in strict compliance with relevant regulations and laws.

"We attach a great importance to a scientific and economic approach to the venues development since construction of the venues started amid the global financial crisis," the notice said.

Nearly 8 billion yuan ($1.17 billion) has been invested in building new venues and renovating old facilities for the Games, which are scheduled to begin on Nov 12, organizers said.

In an early plan approved by the central government in 2006, as many as 96 venues were planned for the Games.

But organizers finally decided to develop only 72 venues for the Games due to the impact of the global financial crisis, and to help reduce investment.

However, some local people's congress deputies said organizers and the government should let the public know how much is needed to host the Games.

"We also need to know how such a large amount of investment money is used," said Deng Chengming, a deputy to the Guangdong provincial people's congress.

So far, neither organizers nor the local government has publicized any reports regarding the funds used for the upcoming Asian Games. "Publication of a report showing how the funds were used is of great importance in avoiding foul play in the construction of sport facilities for the Games," Deng said.

Zhang Weicheng, director of the supervision and auditing department of the organizing committee, said no cases of misconduct and fund embezzling has been detected since the construction of the venues began.

"We have introduced a series of supervisory measures to prevent any foul play," Zhang said.

Organizers have set up a special committee consisting of supervisory and auditing officials and experts to monitor construction of venues, Zhang said.

"The committee has helped develop a 'firewall' against any foul play in the Games' projects since its introduction two years ago," Zhang said.

Also on Jan 28, Guangzhou Party secretary Zhu Xiaodan urged the building of a "clean Asian Games".

"Any official or company manager found to be involved in foul play during preparation for the Games will be severely punished," Zhu said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 08:45 AM   #329
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Villagers protest construction of incinerator in southern China
25 January 2010

GUANGZHOU, China (AP) - About 100 villagers on Monday protested the construction of a garbage incinerator in southern China, alleging several residents have already become sick from pollution from another trash-burning facility in the area.

Waste disposal is becoming a contentious issue as crowded China tries to find new places to dump garbage. Citizens have become more environmentally conscious, more worried about their health and property -- and more willing to protest.

Monday's protesters came from the village of Likeng, where people have long complained that an incinerator in the area was causing cancer and other illnesses. They were angry that the government had begun building another incinerator in the village, in the northern part of the booming city of Guangzhou.

Carrying small white protest signs, the 100 or so demonstrators tried to march close to the Guangdong provincial government's headquarters. But scores of police boxed them in and then corralled them off with crime scene tape on the sidewalk across from the government building.

"The government refuses to listen to the people. We don't want another incinerator because we know the one we have now is killing people," said a protester who would only give her surname, Chen. "At night, we don't dare open our windows because the air is so bad."

The government has repeatedly said the incinerator was safe. An official who observed Monday's protest told the AP the villagers' complaints were being considered.

"The city will handle this matter in a proper way. We just hope everyone will be calm and reasonable," said the official, who would only give his surname, Hu, and declined to say which department he worked for.

On Sunday, about 400 people protested the construction of another incinerator in the Gaoming district of Foshan, a city next to Guangzhou, the state-run Southern Daily newspaper reported Monday.

Demonstrators have also been active in Guangzhou's southern Panyu district, where officials recently decided to delay an incinerator project so that they could do more environmental tests and public consultation.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 1st, 2010, 05:49 PM   #330
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Upheaval of urban renewal
26 February 2010
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

Amid sky rocketing housing prices and limited supplies, many would consider Li lucky to live in a new apartment.

Having frequently been to the neighborhood where she grew up to catch up with old friends and relatives, Li said: "I miss the people here all the time."

She is one of the many residents in Liwan district's Enning Road who were forced to relocate after a major renewal project began in the area in 2008.

Following the renovation of Enning Road, authorities in Guangzhou announced another ambitious 100 billion yuan ($14 billion) facelift in January, which means demolishing more than 10 percent of the old town's built-up areas and relocating up to 600,000 people.

"Old buildings are torn down. For those of us affected by the renewal, the renovation means an end to long-term friendships with neighbors. We cannot visit old friends as often as before," 65-year-old Li said.

Under the plan, a total of 10.5 million square meters of old buildings will be demolished, according to sources with the Guangzhou urban planning authority.

Public opinion on the project has been solicited by the authority, which placed on its website a preliminary urban renewal framework for the development from this year to 2020.

Initial results from the consultation, which will last until the end of this month, indicate that a majority of the people who responded are in support of the renewal plan, sources with the authority said.

"While the renovation plan is good, the authorities should place more importance on protecting traditional, Guangzhou-style buildings and the surrounding cultural heritage in the area," said a resident surnamed Huang.

The authority stressed that public participation will be encouraged in drawing up a comprehensive renewal plan, as protecting Guangzhou's monuments and heritage was a long-term and challenging goal.

It is the largest old town renovation plan by the local government, which aims to free up land and beautify the urban landscape, since the government announced a massive urban redevelopment project in downtown Haizhu district two years ago.

Under the plan, old buildings in Haizhu were scheduled for repair on the south bank of the Pearl River, which required the relocation of some 20,000 people.

Meanwhile, the new renewal plan will cover many historic heritage sites and monuments and will revitalize 54 sq km of old towns stretching across Yuexiu, Liwan and Haizhu districts.

Cultural heritage projects and the protection of monuments are paid for by the district and municipal government.

Accordingly, the new plan will be financed by the municipal government, though authorities are considering bringing outside investment in on the project.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 3rd, 2010, 11:08 AM   #331
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Five-star headache in store after Games
3 March 2010
SCMP

Luxury hotels racing to open in time for the 2010 Asian Games in Guangzhou could see a fall in occupancy and room rates once the Games are over, analysts warn.

At least 12 five-star hotels are under construction in main districts, such as Tianhe, Xuexiu, Haizhu, of the Pearl River port city.

Three leading international chains are among those with new hotels - W Hotel Guangzhou, Marriott Grandview Plaza and Sheraton Guangzhou Hotel - targeting an opening ahead of the Asian Games, which will be staged from November 12 to November 27.

The three hotels will offer 1,200 new rooms, all in the city's central Tianhe district, and once all 12 hotels are completed, the number of hotel rooms in the city will be increased by 4,675, according to property firm Colliers International.

Faced with this abundant new supply - equivalent to a 42.4 per cent increase in the existing stock of 8,117 rooms - hotel owners face higher risks in terms of operating performance, said Bryan Chan, director of Colliers International's research and project advisory division.

Woody Lam, managing director of Savills' southern China office, agreed.

"It is unavoidable that we will see a decline in room rates following the Asia Games by the end of this year as demand drops," Lam said.

Guangzhou will be the second Chinese city to host the Games, after Beijing in 1990. A total of 42 sports are scheduled to be contested, making it the largest Asian Games ever.

Tianhe, which is Guangzhou's traditional central business district, will retain its key attractions at least until the city's new CBD in Zhujiang New Town becomes mature, Chan said. Hotels in the area will continue to be supported, although demand is likely to decline after the Games.

Xie Meng, vice-chairman of Guangzhou Grandview Enterprise, which owns Marriott, said he was confident of ongoing demand for hotel rooms in the city.

Grandview Plaza plans a "soft" opening on National Day, on October 1. It is located in front of the Games stadium and will attract enough guests to fill the rooms, Xie said.

Helping boost demand will be the city's strong economic performance and increased business activities. Guangzhou's GDP rose 11.5 per cent to 911.27 billion yuan last year.

But new hotels opening in less attractive areas or old hotels built in the 1980s, such as The Garden Hotel, could struggle to fill their rooms, property consultants said.

The most popular hotel in Guangzhou is the Westin, which charges about 1,000 yuan per night for a room, well below the more than 2,000 yuan per night charged at top hotels in Shanghai.

Lam said that at such rates hotels would have little difficulty attracting guests during the Games, but warned that demand would drop after the event, and owners of hotels would then have to cut rates.

Another challenge that owners of hotels in Guangzhou would have to deal with, Lam said, was the proximity of Hong Kong.

Given the short commuting distance between the two cities, some international guests and Hong Kong residents could prefer a daily visit to Guangzhou, rather than checking into a hotel for an overnight stay, he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2010, 05:41 PM   #332
Christopherhua
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 40
Likes (Received): 3

I readly like Guangdong museum, it's very higtect, strong, have idiosyncrasy. good job!
Christopherhua no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2010, 12:53 PM   #333
sergey220
Registered User
 
sergey220's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Samara
Posts: 279
Likes (Received): 38

at what stage of construction - Asia Pacific Century Plaza?
sergey220 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 23rd, 2010, 06:01 PM   #334
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Storm leaves Guangzhou in deep water
15 May 2010
SCMP

Want to see what a city of water looks like? You no longer need to travel to Venice or Suzhou to find out. Guangzhou, deluged by the heaviest rainfall in a decade on May 7, welcomes you.

Guangzhou became known as China's Venice, the Italian city famed for its canals and islands for centuries, in just a few hours.

An average of 128 millimetres of rain hit urban areas that morning, turning the host city for November's Asian Games into a very large swimming pool.

Seven people were killed by lightning or accidents caused by the rainfall, 87 towns and communities and nearly 3,580 hectares of farmland were flooded, and at least 138 flights and 14 trains were cancelled.

Traffic jams in the city centre, many parts of which were under water, caused tens of thousands of people to be late for work. One office worker was trapped in a bus for two hours and finally completed his journey to work in three hours - arriving an hour before lunch.

But the vehicles caught in traffic jams were luckier than some. More than 1,400 cars became submarines because their owners didn't have time to save them from underground garages that flooded. Local media reported that more than 18,000 vehicles suffered some degree of damage and that insurance payouts could total as much as 170 million yuan (HK$193 million).

On some university campuses, including the main campuses of Jinan University and Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in the city centre, students were woken by water pouring into ground-floor dormitory rooms. Many complained that personal property was damaged.

For the whole morning, even several hours after the rain stopped, they had to wade through water to get to their classrooms.

The end of the downpour did not end Guangzhou's ombrophobia. When the local observatory warned of the likelihood of more heavy rain on May 9 and 10, residents started to panic that the city, no stranger to summer rainstorms, was about to become Venice once again. In some residential communities, car owners rushed to move their cars from underground garages.

The city's water affairs bureau admitted that the public and media were right in blaming the flooding on the hundreds of construction sites dotted around the city, which had caused severe obstruction to its drainage system.

Officials said there were more than 2,000 construction projects in the city, including the laying of sewer pipes, paving of main streets, and, ironically, the construction of channels to improve the drainage system.

Some construction workers were found to have dumped rubble into the sewers, some had covered drain outlets with construction material and others had damaged the drainage system during their work.

City leaders and senior officials pledged they would, in future, punish construction firms that failed to take care of the drainage system.

Meanwhile, members of the public said the authorities' poor management of construction projects had contributed to the mess. It is generally believed that the rush to beautify the city ahead of the Asian Games is behind the launching of so many projects at the same time. People asked why the government, which cared so much about the height of skyscrapers and the colour and decoration of buildings along main streets, could not also pay attention to the sewers.

It is unfair to say that Guangzhou has ignored the problem. But even though it spent about 900 million yuan last year on improving its drainage system, the massive facelift ahead of the Asian Games and inefficient management have undone all that good work.

The challenge facing city officials in the next few months is how to convince residents that the same thing will not happen when the next storm comes.

People need solid proof that their shoes, clothes and even fridges will not float away in the middle of the night, their underground garages will not be flooded and that an improved sewer system will be able to deal with rain intensities seen only once every 50 years, let alone once every 10.

The next test might come very soon. From May to as late as November, coastal cities like Guangzhou can expect typhoons, bringing strong winds and more heavy rain.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 29th, 2010, 07:49 AM   #335
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

A red rooftop revolution sweeps over southern Chinese city, angering residents
21 May 2010

GUANGZHOU, China (AP) - Their drab concrete apartment buildings are starting to look more like Spanish villas with red-tiled roofs, and that's angering many who live in them.

For the past year, workers have been repainting hundreds of buildings in Guangzhou and topping them with pitched roofs made of PVC sheets molded to look like tiles. It's part of a government-led campaign to spiff up this gritty metropolis for the Asian Games, a major sports competition in November.

The faux roofs have enraged many middle-class residents, but there is little they can do. Urban Chinese have enjoyed an explosion of personal freedom in the past three decades. They can pick their own jobs, start their own businesses and buy their own apartments.

But the government can still show up one day and announce that their homes will be getting a red roof -- whether they like it or not. Though many believe they deserve a greater say in civic affairs, citizens remain powerless when officials launch a massive campaign with little or no public consultation.

"A few of my neighbors occupied their roofs and refused to leave, but they had to eventually," said Zheng, an office worker. Like other residents, she wouldn't give her full name, fearing trouble with officials. "We don't have a choice. There's no use challenging the government."

Neighborhoods have become construction zones, with buildings surrounded by rusty steel and bamboo scaffolding covered with tattered green mesh. Crews put up metal frames on the flattop buildings and cover them with the PVC sheets.

Many in this southern Chinese city, also known as Canton, said the roofs symbolize a negative aspect of Chinese culture: an overemphasis on superficial appearance and showing off for guests, especially those from abroad.

Beijing carried out a similar facelift for the Olympic Games in 2008, and Shanghai, for the World Expo that opened this month.

"It's all just for show," said Chen, a young mother, who would only give her surname. "They're just putting new clothes and a hat on my building. In a year, it'll look bad again."

Most of the red-roofed buildings are in areas where foreigners are most likely to go during the Asian Games, which is expected to attract 25,000 athletes, coaches and journalists from 45 countries. They line the highway from the airport and the train tracks from nearby Hong Kong, and they surround some of the fancier tourist hotels.

The Potemkin village quality of the roofs mars the cityscape, said Valery Garrett, a Hong Kong-based author who has been visiting Guangzhou for decades and wrote the book, "Heaven is High, the Emperor Far Away, Merchants and Mandarins in Old Guangzhou."

Garrett is amused by the fake dormer windows in many of the roofs. "The idea of having dormer windows when there's nothing inside of them is ludicrous," she said.

The city government says the roof campaign -- called "changing the flat to sloped" -- is a practical move to prevent roofs from leaking during the rainy season and to shield buildings from the sun in the summer.

"The roofs can change the architectural scenery and will help us meet our goal of beautifying the city and improving the living environment," a government statement said.

Figures for how many buildings would get the roofs were not available yet, the statement said, but early estimates put the number at about 1,000. The government wouldn't release the overall cost but said each square meter (10.8 square feet) of roofing costs between 400 yuan ($58) and 500 yuan ($73).

The fuzzy numbers fuel perceptions that officials use such projects to enrich themselves by pocketing kickbacks and embezzling funds.

Juan Du, an architecture professor at the University of Hong Kong, said the red roof campaign reminds her of the City Beautiful Movement in the United States in the 1890s and early 1900s.

Chicago, Detroit, Washington, D.C., and other cities borrowed classical and European styles to spruce up buildings in the belief that it would promote social harmony and civic virtue.

"The notion was that by improving the image of the city, you're improving life in the city," she said.

But, she added, critics say the approach creates an artificial image that doesn't truly reflect the city.

Migrant worker He Zili, who has been building the roofs, couldn't understand why some residents were so angry. "The government is doing all this for free," he said. "Their homes will look nicer and they don't have to pay. It's a good deal."

But none of the residents interviewed by The Associated Press saw it that way.

"True, the government is paying for the roofs, but it's our money. It's the taxpayers' money," said Zheng, the office worker. "We don't want to waste that money."

As she spoke, a small group of people gathered around, nodding in agreement and punctuating her sentences by saying, "That's right!"

All around them, the work in their central Guangzhou neighborhood went on. The shrill whine of metal-cutting saws echoed through the streets, powered by droning generators giving off the acrid stench of diesel fuel.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 29th, 2010, 09:45 PM   #336
Celebriton
Registered User
 
Celebriton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,715
Likes (Received): 481

A great news. If HK government also have the same mind, HK will be better place than today. If we compare it with Tokyo, athough HK is a developed city, but in some places, it look so dirty, cheap and ugly for the taste of high GDP per capita people. HK need a major makeover and renovation. Of course HK people have choice to renovate their building based on their own taste, but as long as it look very beautiful, artistic and hi-quality.

I never been to HK or Tokyo, just seeing some photos in this forum, travel program in TV and movie about this cities.

Btw, Does someone has new look of Guangzhou skyline after the red rooftop revolution?
Celebriton no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 11th, 2010, 04:19 PM   #337
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Quote:
Originally Posted by Celebriton View Post
A great news. If HK government also have the same mind, HK will be better place than today. If we compare it with Tokyo, athough HK is a developed city, but in some places, it look so dirty, cheap and ugly for the taste of high GDP per capita people. HK need a major makeover and renovation. Of course HK people have choice to renovate their building based on their own taste, but as long as it look very beautiful, artistic and hi-quality.

I never been to HK or Tokyo, just seeing some photos in this forum, travel program in TV and movie about this cities.

Btw, Does someone has new look of Guangzhou skyline after the red rooftop revolution?
I actually didn't see red roofs when I went last year :



__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2010, 04:58 PM   #338
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Urban villages face the wrecker's ball
26 July 2010
SCMP

Urban villages: the term, as oxymoronic as it is, applies to places such as Yangji that the Guangzhou government will tear down under an aggressive 10-year plan to eliminate what it calls 138 "tumours".

They started decades ago as agricultural communities on the outskirts but as Guangzhou began to prosper in the 1980s and 90s, they were dwarfed by surrounding skyscrapers. Now these villages make up about 22 per cent of the city's area. They are poorly designed, poorly built, have bad infrastructure and they attract migrants and lower-class residents, which makes them hotbeds of crime.

It is little wonder that the city government wants to get rid of these slums. And Guangzhou, which used to expand at will, has run out of land, so it has shifted focus to these villages, with the aim of converting them into properties that make more efficient use of space. Nine of the 138, including Yangji, are under a deadline to be demolished by the time the Asian Games begin on November 12.

So there is a sense of anxiety for city leaders who want to polish their image as both a good host for the Games and an international metropolis in general.

The problem they face is that the nearly 1 million residents - one can't really call them villagers any more - will not only lose their homes and the rental incomes they collect from their tenants, but also their sense of history and tradition that has tied them to these curious communities.

Walking in Yangji, which has a permanent population of about 4,000 and more than 10,000 so-called floaters, provides no evidence of farmland but plenty of multi-storey buildings. The shadows they cast make the narrow alleys dark even in daytime, which makes manoeuvring a vehicle even more difficult. But it also lacks an urban quality as hygiene standards fall below that of the rest of Guangzhou. Rubbish is everywhere, greenery is a rare sight and the air is often damp and smelly.

The buildings are old and poorly maintained. They are built so close to one another from the second floor up that locals call this style of architecture "shaking-hands buildings". The idea behind the density of their construction is to maximise landowners' rental income.

The cheap rent and convenient location attract migrants, who flock to Guangzhou seeking better lives and cannot afford better housing in the heart of the metropolis. Today they work as low-level employees or as food and gadget vendors who earn about 2,000 yuan (HK$2,290) a month and pay an average rent of about 700 yuan.

But with the lower-class tenants and residents comes crime. The Southern Metropolis Weekly reported an unofficial figure, unconfirmed by any Guangzhou authority, that 80 per cent of the city's crime cases were committed by non-local residents and 90 per cent of those criminal suspects live in urban villages.

Local authorities, therefore, have labelled the villages as dens of iniquity. They complain that crime, especially prostitution, thrives on the low cost of living there. But they are optimistic that once the redevelopment is completed, rents will rise, which could be one way to drive away low-end industries and people who won't be able to afford the new flats.

"It will help scour the sinks of iniquity," said a Guangzhou official with the management office in charge of the villages' redevelopment.

However, the Guangzhou government has been trying to get rid of this nightmare for at least nine years, and the trillions of yuan that will be needed for demolition and renovation are way out of reach of the city's finances.

Zhao Wenzhuo , a Guangzhou-based real estate analyst, said the provincial government had played an important role in realising the huge plan, which has been discussed for years.

He said it was in mid-2007, about a year after Zhu Xiaodan became the Communist Party secretary of Guangzhou, that the city raised the idea of rebuilding some underdeveloped downtown areas for the first time in a decade.

"But it wasn't until last year, when the central government agreed to provincial party boss Wang Yang's suggestion to highlight Guangzhou's importance within the Pearl River Delta, that the city was given the privilege of launching such a big rebuilding project," Zhao said.

Support from high-level authorities is just the first step in the 10-year plan. Lan Yuyun , a Guangzhou-based scholar on urban redevelopment, said the next big challenge faced by the government would be balancing the interests of multiple players while compensating villagers and allowing property developers to earn their fair share without stirring up social unrest.

The Guangzhou government announced last year that developers could move ahead with refurbishment only when more than two-thirds of villagers agreed on the compensation plan being offered, in a bid to prevent potential conflicts.

Renovation has just been completed for Liede village, the first among the nine that have to meet the Asian Games deadline. Its former residents will move into their new 30-storey apartment buildings at the end of this month. New Liede looks the same as most modern estates in Hong Kong.

Lan said renovating the urban villages would boost the appearance of the city and drive up property values. "But many people at the low-income level will suffer as they relocate in the next couple of years," she said.

Uncle Yao, as he calls himself, is one of those who will have to make way. Yao, 73, was born in Yangji and left it once as a young lad to flee to rural Guangdong to escape the Japanese invasion, which began in 1938 and approached Guangzhou a couple of years later. This second move frightens him as it could well be the last farewell to his homeland.

"If I am lucky, I'll be able to come back in three years and live in Yangji's new flats; if not, I'll probably end up dying in a strange land," he said.

Yao and his family - eight altogether - live in a three-storey building. They rent out half of the first floor to a small food shop for 1,400 yuan a month. It is the loss of that rental income that has kept Yao and other villagers from signing a relocation agreement with the village committee and developers.

Even though the government and developers promised to offer them new homes as big as their old ones once the new buildings are finished, many villagers like Yao have stalled, overcome by a sense of nostalgia.

"We know that ultimately we have to sign the contracts and move out because the plan is launched. But frankly speaking, most of us don't want to leave," Yao said.

Hu Ping , who has run a mini-supermarket in Yangji for nearly 10 years, said she and her husband had to look for a new location for their business, a new primary school for their son and new accommodation. And rents in the city are soaring as tens of thousands of villagers and tenants in the nine villages to be knocked down before November anxiously look for new shelters.

"I came from a rural area in Chaozhou and I am already 40," Hu said, her face bearing the wrinkles of worry.

"If we can't find a new shop to continue our business, what can I do next ... be a cleaning woman?"
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2010, 10:14 PM   #339
Atmosphere
Live from the sky!
 
Atmosphere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Amsterdam / Seoul
Posts: 2,856
Likes (Received): 797

What do you think about this HKskyline? Is it a good or a bad thing. I know there is more crime in those ''villages', but when walking trough them, its sometimes actually quite nice and sometimes even better than walking between high glass skyscrapers. I think some of them should be preserved.
__________________
Build it
Atmosphere no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2010, 11:25 PM   #340
CoCoMilk
Registered User
 
CoCoMilk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,578
Likes (Received): 1131


These Buildings
1) NOT traditional Chinese buildings
2) Crime hub
3) Poor hygiene, maintenance, and below safety standard
4) No locals likes them

I feel kinda offended when foreigners want to save these unsafe old buildings just so they can "tour" them at the expense of the locals. But of course, having lived there for long times and accustomed to the environments there, I think it would be a hard task for the government to adjust these residents into new apartments and jobs. Basically, if you can give the locals, a new source of income..most if not all would rather move out of there for a better living environment. I mean, would anyone here want to live in those? So with that being said, replacing these buildings with considerations for the future livelihood of the residents, in my opinion is the best way forward.
CoCoMilk no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
guangzhou

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu