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Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:47 AM   #341
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Okay thanks for the explanation. I'm just worried that all those developments will be skyscrapers-in-parks concepts. When I was in shanghai, the new part of pudong looks fantastic but it is absolutely not walk-friendly (of course there a big sidewalks, but that is not what I mean) while for example Nanjing Road is very nice to walk. Those old parts I visited in China were almost always more friendly for pedestrians than the new parts.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 09:03 AM   #342
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What do you think about this HKskyline? Is it a good or a bad thing. I know there is more crime in those ''villages', but when walking trough them, its sometimes actually quite nice and sometimes even better than walking between high glass skyscrapers. I think some of them should be preserved.
Like the hutongs in Beijing, many of these traditional areas are not fit for habitation in today's modern society. It is not economical or worthwhile to preserve most of them, such as gutting out the interiors and maintaining the facades. However, I am concerned at what is replacing these - tall, soul-less towers that don't encourage street-level interaction.

I think the replacement needs to be a manageable density and well-planned. We can keep a few of the historic buildings as community landmarks, but I don't think mass-preserving these will make sense.
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Old August 2nd, 2010, 02:30 PM   #343
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Like the hutongs in Beijing, many of these traditional areas are not fit for habitation in today's modern society. It is not economical or worthwhile to preserve most of them, such as gutting out the interiors and maintaining the facades. However, I am concerned at what is replacing these - tall, soul-less towers that don't encourage street-level interaction.

I think the replacement needs to be a manageable density and well-planned. We can keep a few of the historic buildings as community landmarks, but I don't think mass-preserving these will make sense.
Thanks for your vision! Your right in that maybe preserving is not necessary. I'm worried because demolishing those old parts means often that it is indeed going to be replaced by what you say, soulless towers that don't encourage street-level interaction. And that last bit about street-level interaction is very important for city's.
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Old August 10th, 2010, 12:57 PM   #344
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Arts playground emerges in China
An intriguing complex rises among the factories of a booming Guangzhou

4 August 2010
International Herald Tribune

Hong Kong has always looked down on Guangzhou as its poor mainland cousin. But while the affluent former British colony has stalled for years over plans for a massive cultural district, Guangzhou has gone ahead and built one.

This southern Chinese city surrounded by factory towns opened its new Guangdong Museum and Guangzhou Opera this spring. On tap are a public library and a children’s art center.

The government has not put a price tag on the entire project, though media reports have estimated that the four venues will cost 3.4 billion renminbi, about $500 million. Guangzhou hopes to unveil the complex by November, when it plays host to the Asian Games.

That is the plan. As is usually the case in China, the hardware was built first and the software is still on its way.

Months after the museum’s opening in May, workers are drilling and hammering amid piles of dirt and rubble to prepare the rest of the complex. The opera house and the museum are open for business — two beautiful architectural models rising from a junkyard. But the transport hub, taxi stands and pedestrian walkways have not been completed, causing crowd and traffic problems, particularly when the opera lets out in bad weather.

Rocco Yim, the Hong Kong architect who designed the museum, reported to cost 900 million renminbi, stood at its entrance and pointed past the construction site to the spaceship-like opera house designed by the London-based architect Zaha Hadid for an estimated 1.4 billion renminbi. ‘‘The two will be connected by a wide pedestrian avenue,’’ Mr. Yim said, ‘‘so people can walk right from the opera to the museum through open green space. Here will be a large slope where people can lie down in the grass. Roadside pollution will be cut down by diverting vehicular traffic underground.’’

The museum is an enormous cube made of gray and red puzzle pieces that light up with a scarlet glow at night. ‘‘I wanted to create the feeling of a lacquered Chinese jewelry box,’’ Mr. Yim said, ‘‘an exquisite container holding valuables inside.’’

Natural light floods the museum through its jigsaw-shaped holes and skylights. A walkway and a cube-shaped gallery float above the lobby. Spaces are divided not by walls but by translucent screens, adding to the airiness.

There is no stand-out, priceless treasure in the Guangdong Museum’s collection — certainly nothing comparable with the Palace Museum in Taipei, say. But there is much southern Chinese folk art, like Chiuchow wood carvings, calligraphy and ink paintings, and the natural history section is definitely child-friendly. Mr. Yim said his favorite room is the vast atrium where life-sized models of whales and dolphins are suspended from the ceiling, flooded in blue light. From there you can look straight down to the dinosaur fossils displayed on the floor below.

The opera house — all silvery twists and curves — is the aesthetic opposite of the squarish museum. Its latticework skin covers two structures: a large hall for operas and a concert hall for recitals.

Liu Xiaolu, a Guangzhou Opera spokesman, said: ‘‘In a short period of time it has changed the cultural scene here, which was relatively limited until recently. Before it was just Beijing and Shanghai. Major international productions — whether it was opera or pop music — would pass right over us and go straight to Hong Kong. We just didn’t have the venues. We didn’t even have a stage large enough to fit all the swans in Swan Lake. Now it’s Guangzhou’s turn.’’

In its first two months, the house put on three fully staged operas, all of which were well attended. Mr. Liu noted that they had a good number of visitors from Hong Kong for the opening show, Puccini’s ‘‘Turandot.’’

Whenever an expensive project is built with state money, questions are raised about its relevance. Lianhe Zaobao, a Chinese-language newspaper in Singapore, asked in an editorial whether top ticket prices for ‘‘Turandot,’’ at 2,880 renminbi, were appropriate in a city where the average monthly salary is 3,942 renminbi.

Arguably, ‘‘Turandot’’ was an exception, as it was the venue’s opening gala and was conducted by Lorin Maazel. Plus, many of the tickets went to officials, organizers and other V.I.P.s.

But even for the ‘‘Mulan’’ opera — a domestic production that has been on tour for several years — the best seats cost 1,200 renminbi.

The Guangzhou Opera countered that it has offered a range of discounted tickets for students and the disadvantaged. In an upcoming Canadian production of ‘‘Alice in Wonderland,’’ for instance, a donation from a corporate sponsor allowed seats for two of the four shows to be set aside for disadvantaged residents. ‘‘This is definitely a public facility,’’ Mr. Liu said.

In Chinese, the Guangzhou Opera’s name actually says nothing about opera — it is probably better translated as the Guangzhou Center for Performing Arts. Its roster of future events includes modern dance, multimedia shows, pop acts and children’s programming like ‘‘Sesame Street Live.’’ The spokesman said the house also is hoping to stage Yue Opera, or Cantonese Opera, with troupes from Hong Kong or Macao.

In terms of balancing artistic ambition with public sentiment, the opera house got it right with ‘‘Mulan,’’ which was about 80 percent full. It was the operatic version of the Chinese costume melodramas so loved by television audiences. It pulled at every populist heartstring, from the plucky woman warrior in a bright silk robe to the backdrops of peony branches and a red sunset over the Great Wall.

The composition for chorus and full orchestra — complete with a conductor in tails highlighted by a spotlight on stage — is Western. But there was a definite Chinese influence to the singing style and the volume of the percussion.

Or maybe the drums were there to drown out the crowd’s babbling, of telephones ringing, of children playing in the aisles and of people trying to sneak into better seats. A review of ‘‘Turandot’’ in the Financial Times in May made note of the myriad distractions, like flash photography and the static of the security guards’ walkie-talkies.

At the Guangdong Museum, meanwhile, Wang Xiaoying, the director of education and promotion, estimated that the venue was getting 7,000 to 8,000 visitors a day.

When construction is finished, people will be able to enter from the ground-floor entrance that is linked to the grassy area and the walkway to the opera. For now, they are herded into a waiting area ringed with metal barriers.

Still, on a sweltering Sunday afternoon, the line stretched down the street. Liu Jin, a Guangzhou resident, said he had been waiting 20 minutes to get in. ‘‘Of course it’s worth it to see,’’ he said. ‘‘It’s free to the public. Plus, every big city has a big museum and now we do, too.’’
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Old August 14th, 2010, 07:24 AM   #345
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Does anyone know what builing in Guangzhou will have or has an observation deck?
The TV tower will have one, but what about the others new building in Zhujiang New Town? Leatop plaza would be perfect for that for example.
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Old August 14th, 2010, 11:47 AM   #346
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Guangzhou still long way to go.it needed massive urban renewal program.
travel to guangzhou and then to Hong Kong, I recall is just like inside the black and white television to a high definition color television.
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Old August 14th, 2010, 06:06 PM   #347
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Does anyone know what builing in Guangzhou will have or has an observation deck?
The TV tower will have one, but what about the others new building in Zhujiang New Town? Leatop plaza would be perfect for that for example.
Haven't heard of another one being set up, but Baiyun Mountain's view should be quite good.
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Old August 16th, 2010, 05:42 PM   #348
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Guangzhou slum residents battle police
Tear gas used on protesters in urban village facing demolition ahead of Asian Games

14 August 2010
South China Morning Post

Hundreds of residents and police in Guangzhou clashed early yesterday after the authorities started demolishing parts of a slum area slated to come under the wrecking ball ahead of the Asian Games.

City authorities have embarked on an ambitious drive to clear all slum areas as part of an image makeover for the games in November.

Security guards descended on the Xian village area in Tianhe district at around 10pm on Thursday, according to witnesses who live near the area. In the early hours of yesterday, hundreds of riot police poured into the area to confront residents.

Both sides threw rocks at each other. After a two-hour stand-off, riot police rushed towards the residents and started beating them, according to witnesses.

"We'll defend ourselves till we die," some of the residents were heard to shout.

The conflict continued till dawn. Police used tear gas to disperse the crowd and ordered residents to leave, according to a resident who lives opposite the Xian village.

"They were fighting with each other. Police were beating anybody who happened to be near," the resident, who refused to give his name, said by phone. "I saw a young man badly beaten. He was seriously wounded.

"How can police carry out their duties so violently?"

He said Xian villagers had demonstrated against the demolition plan many times over the past year but their voices went unheeded. They accused local officials of colluding with developers by selling their land below the market price. They also refused to move because they were trying to fight for more compensation.

A woman who lives nearby said a number of residents had attacked the officers and some threw bricks at police vehicles. There were more than a dozen police vehicles and riot police armed themselves with shields and sticks, she said.

"The residents were beating policemen too," she said.

The Hong Kong-based Information Centre for Human Rights and Democracy said about 20 residents were wounded.

The Tianhe district government said yesterday that government officials in charge of the demolition encountered violence when carrying out their duty on Thursday, and two officers were injured. Local police were called to maintain order and some collectively owned properties were demolished according to law.

"The demolition would speed up the construction of a [high-speed link] and further improve the transportation environment," the e-mailed statement said.

A staff member at Xian village police station said no residential buildings had been demolished and only public areas such as a market had been demolished. He refused to respond to further questions.

"The residents are all still here," he said.

The Xian area, like many other so-called "urban villages", started decades ago as an agricultural community on the outskirts of the city. As Guangzhou began to prosper in the 1980s and '90s, they were dwarfed by surrounding skyscrapers.

These slums make up about 22 per cent of the city. They are poorly built, have bad infrastructure and attract migrants and low-paid workers because of the cheap rents. They are considered hotbeds of crime.

The Guangzhou government wants to convert them into properties that make more efficient use of space. Nine of the 138 slums, including Xian, are under a deadline to be demolished by the time the Asian Games begin on November 12.
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Old August 18th, 2010, 09:15 AM   #349
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Here some pictures taken today in Zhujiang New Town. I went there one month ago and I was really surprised today to see the progress they made.








The probable entrance to that new "subway" line running through CBD



Cladding close to completed



The cladding finally started on the Leatop Plazza

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Old August 18th, 2010, 09:39 AM   #350
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nice! thanks for the update
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Old August 19th, 2010, 12:50 PM   #351
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Athletes to get cleaner air
17 August 2010
China Daily - Hong Kong Edition

GUANGZHOU - Guangzhou is using a variety of high-tech measures to ensure air quality is up to scratch for the upcoming Asian Games.

As of September 1, owners of large-sized vehicles, such as limousines, are ordered to use the highest national standard of gasoline, which pollutes less.

The city's environmental protection bureau has set up 29 checkpoints to monitor automobile emissions along with four mobile units. Since August 1, the bureau has also carried out checks on vehicles' emission control systems to make sure they are working correctly.

About 30 percent of the total 9,300 government cars and the city's police officers' cars will be off the road from October 12 to December 22, in order to decrease pollution emissions, said Li Zhuo, director of the motor pollution control office, Guangzhou environmental protection bureau.

Meanwhile, all construction sites in the city, except those with special authorization, will be asked to stop building from the end of September to the end of December, said Zhang Guangning, secretary of Guangzhou Party committee.

In November, the city usually registers its worst air quality due to the colder weather, which makes it more difficult to monitor pollution.

Jian Jianyang, director of the pollution control division at the environmental protection bureau, said factories that pollute excessively will have to limit their production during the Games and will not be allowed to return to normal production levels until December 20.

The highly-polluted capital of Guangdong province began to look into improving its air quality after it won its bid to host the 16th Asian Games in July 2004.

"It's not just an emergency package to limit the air pollution," said Jian. "It's a long-term measure and we see the Games as an opportunity to achieve it quicker."
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Old August 22nd, 2010, 09:20 AM   #352
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PROCTOR & GAMBLE CO PROMISES 'FULL COURT PRESS' IN CHINA

BEIJING, Aug 20 Asia Pulse - The world's largest consumer goods company Procter & Gamble Co (P&G) said that it plans to invest at least US$1 billion in China over the next five years, in an effort to strengthen both its manufacturing and research and development capabilities.

Bob McDonald, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of P&G told China Daily on Wednesday that "China is P&G's second-largest consumer market in the world following the United States, but per capita consumption is still far less than that of the US." For that reason, P&G is compelled to "continue to increase investment in the market", he said.

According to McDonald, P&G generated $5 billion in sales in China for fiscal year 2009, accounting for 7 percent of its global sales revenues of $75 billion.

As part of the investment plan, P&G will set up an innovation center in Beijing with an investment of $80 million and over 500 employees from 16 countries.

The innovation center aims to develop new products that are tailored especially for emerging markets including China.

"One of the reasons we (decided) to establish the innovation center here is we can take advantage of China's universities, research and development technologies and scientists," said McDonald.

The innovation center will mainly be involved in the development of products including fabric care, oral hygiene, baby care and snack foods.

In addition to the innovation center, a distribution center will be built next month in Guangzhou where the firm's Chinese headquarters is located, serving distribution for both home and abroad.

McDonald also said that P&G has decided to build the tenth new factory in the Yangtze River Delta region.

During the past over two decades, P&G has invested more than $1.5 billion in China.

The company's aggressive investments are driven by its ambitious goal of adding one billion more new consumers worldwide by 2015, from the current four billion.

Last year, sales in emerging markets contributed 30 percent of the company's total sales of $75 billion around the world.

McDonald is expecting emerging markets will contribute more than half of the company's growth next year.

"In the Chinese market, we're also planning to introduce more product categories to appeal to every consumer here," McDonald said, noting that P&G is currently in around 15 products categories in China, versus 35 in the US.

According to McDonald, one of the biggest challenges for P&G's development is governmental protectionism during the financial crisis.

P&G is now working with the Chinese government on a project named "10,000 Villages" designed to create distribution networks for household products in rural areas in China to reach more Chinese consumers as it targets 5 billion consumers by 2015.
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Old September 3rd, 2010, 05:54 AM   #353
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I read in this article "South of Zhujiang New Town, a new CBD awaits" that the CBD on the north south axis which goes from Citic Plazza to the TV Tower will be extended south in Haizhu Disctrict.






They don't tell much detail about the starting time nor the building.

So they will probably develop Baietan CBD and Haizhu CBD extension at the same time. Guangzhou is really "The" booming city in China with Chongqing and Tianjin.
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Old September 3rd, 2010, 06:03 AM   #354
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good news,

Guangzhou and Foshan have still many spots open for redevelopment in Central districts.

A combination of both Guangzhou and Foshan should reach around 2000 to 2500 km2 in core Urban city (excluding small suburbs and rural).
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Old September 8th, 2010, 07:41 PM   #355
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China to build a batch of inter-city rail transit lines in 2011-2015
6 September 2010
Xinhua

FUZHOU - China will kick off construction of a batch of inter-city rail transit lines uring the 2011-2015 period, said Lu Dongfu, Chinese vice minister of railways, on a forum held in Fuzhou, capital city of the eastern Fujian province.

Lu said that inter-city transits, with high density, huge capacity and quick speed and being energy saving, safe, comfortable and punctual, have injected fresh vitality to China's city development.

Lu disclosed that during the 2011-2015 period, construction of some inter-city rail transit lines, including Changsha-Changde, Liuyang-Chengdu-Ya'an and Mianyang-Suining-Yibin rail transit lines, will be kicked off.

Meanwhile, the inter-city rail transits including Guangzhou-Shenzhen, Guangzhou-Zhuhai, Jiujiang-Nanchang and Eastern ring railways in Hainan, will be put into operation this year. Besides, construction of several other inter-railways is being advanced at present.

Lu noted that by 2015, China's passenger inter-city express lines will reach over 20,000 kilometers, which will covers all the provincial capitals and cities with population over 500,000 in the pan-Pearl River Delta area.
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Old September 14th, 2010, 06:07 AM   #356
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Meanwhile, the inter-city rail transits including Guangzhou-Shenzhen, Guangzhou-Zhuhai, Jiujiang-Nanchang and Eastern ring railways in Hainan, will be put into operation this year. Besides, construction of several other inter-railways is being advanced at present.
Anyone know when this line will be open? before Asian Games?

The metro to Airport should be open any time also
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Old September 15th, 2010, 03:47 AM   #357
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I don't know, that new CBD extension may get in the way of soem existing residential buildings, sone of which may be newly-built.
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Old October 1st, 2010, 11:29 AM   #358
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GUANGZHOU UNVEILS 34 ENERGY EFFICIENT PROJECTS WORTH US$37BLN

GUANGZHOU, Oct 1 Asia Pulse - In an effort to build a low-carbon economy, the Guangzhou City Government in China has unveiled 34 energy efficient projects, amounting to a total planned investment of 250 billion yuan ($37.37 billion).

The projects include public transport systems, light-emitting diode (LED) products and projects in the new energy sector, Chen Haotian, deputy director of Guangzhou's development and reform commission, told a press conference.

The list of low-carbon projects will be extended in the future, he said.

The city authorities recently issued a guideline for speeding up the development of a low-carbon economy between 2011 and 2015, aiming to reduce energy intensity from the equivalence of 0.65 tons of coal per 10,000 yuan (US$1,494) of GDP to 0.54-0.56 tons in 2015 According to the guideline, the city plans to initiate widespread low-carbon economic activities next year in the hope of achieving low-carbon production and consumption in 2013.

"Many domestic cities have devised strategies for becoming low carbon. Those that get a head start will be in an advantageous position in the competition," Chen said.

The key tasks set out in the guideline include establishing a low-carbon means of economic production and consumption, using energy optimally, researching and applying related technologies, designing green architecture, low-carbon industrial parks and a carbon trading market.

For example, the first phase of the 200-million-yuan cooling system in Guangzhou's central business district is designed to annually reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) by 18,538 tons and sulfur dioxide (SO2) by 49 tons, according to the Guangzhou Pearl River New Town Energy Co.

Progress has been made in Guangzhou with the development of patented technologies for harnessing solar power, conserving energy in buildings, the development of biomass energy, smart transport and the distribution of energy.

In upgrading its economic structure, last year Guangzhou generated more than 60 per cent of its GDP from the service industry and 33 per cent of its industrial output from high-tech products, according to figures from the city government.

New energy and environmental industries contributed to 2 per cent of the industrial output of the city in 2008, while clean energy systems accounted for more than 20 per cent of the city's energy consumption.

However, there are still hurdles to be jumped before Guangzhou is able to achieve its low-carbon ambitions.

It will be challenging for the city to move away from being a high-energy consumer and producer of emissions, especially when there was an 8 per cent annual increase in the consumption of energy from 2006 to 2010.

Coal still accounts for 46 per cent of the city's energy use, Chen said.

It will also be difficult to persuade enterprises and individuals to upgrade their current equipment so that it is environmentally friendly, he added.
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Old October 1st, 2010, 02:06 PM   #359
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CBD underground system





--home.news.cn
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Old October 2nd, 2010, 04:32 PM   #360
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Wow, impressive Guangzhou, a mega-city of China.
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