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Old July 22nd, 2013, 09:33 AM   #481
Puppetgeneral
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Any more news about the new CBD?
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Old July 25th, 2013, 05:06 AM   #482
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Guangzhou tries to win support for garbage incinerator

GUANGZHOU, July 24 (Xinhua) -- Authorities in China's southern metropolis of Guangzhou said they will not approve the construction of a garbage incineration facility if the project fails to pass evaluations concerning environmental protection, social risk and land acquisition.

In the week starting Wednesday, three departments in the city will consult residents living near the planned facility and ask if they are comfortable with the project.

On June 26, Guangzhou's urban planning committee designated a village in the Huadu District as the facility's primary location.

The decision sparked strong opposition from tens of thousands of local residents, with opponents saying the facility is too close to a densely-populated area.

"Why did the expert panel pick such a populous spot? There are plenty of empty places," said a villager surnamed Liu.

Others are concerned about possible health hazards, arguing that the facility will increase pollution, which is already heavy due to the large number of leather manufacturers operating in the area.

"We sifted through all viable locations. We also consulted experts from well-known institutions like Peking University," said Qiu Weibin, director of Huadu's urban management bureau. "The location is safe. With advanced technology and all-around supervision, we can guarantee that the incinerator would operate safely."

Local authorities have been trying to build the facility for years, but the public has yet to give approval. In 2009, local residents rejected the results of an initial environmental safety evaluation. Three years later, a second evaluation also failed to garner enough public support. A third evaluation began at the end of last year.

Other incineration facilities in Guangzhou have met similar opposition. In 2009, residents of the city's Panyu District protested against the construction of a garbage incinerator.

In a separate case, the municipal government had to relocate villagers living near the Baiyun District in order to built an incinerator there.

"We will not start the project as long as the public is against it," said a statement from Guangzhou's urban management committee.

With urbanization running high in China, governments in many large cities have been eyeing incinerators as a viable alternative to landfills. Although the governments have promised that the facilities would be operated safely and cleanly according to EU standards, few of the projects have won public support.

Urban residents are aware that landfills are no longer a practical option for taking care of the surging amount of refuse produced by big cities. However, few are willing to allow garbage incinerators to be built in their backyards.

Experts said the government's current method of tackling the problem, which simply involves stopping the projects after protests have already occurred, will undermine public trust.

"The government needs to consult the public at the beginning of the evaluation process, not after. It should provide adequate information and welcome public participation," said Peng Peng, a researcher at the Guangzhou Academy of Social Sciences.

He Yanling, a professor of public administration at Sun Yat-Sen University, said the government should establish a comprehensive mechanism for public communication in order to gain support for the projects.

"We can learn from international practices, such as creating laws to govern the rights and duties of every party involved in projects that everybody wants to shun," the professor said.
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Old July 25th, 2013, 06:10 AM   #483
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Originally Posted by Puppetgeneral View Post
Any more news about the new CBD?
Which one? The one in the perimeter of Zhujiang River / Huangpu Dadao / Chebei Lu? The whole area from small smelly river eastward is being currently clear up from any buildings, trees, etc.
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Old July 31st, 2013, 10:53 AM   #484
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I mean the one in Pazhou/Yuancun
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Old August 4th, 2013, 10:04 AM   #485
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Line 21 is now starting construction and to be finished some where in 2016. From Yuancun to Zengchung Guangchang.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 05:51 AM   #486
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MTR to export its model to mainland
Operator is in talks with Foshan and Guangzhou on a link based on rail-and-property approach
3 August 2013
South China Morning Post

Overseas rail projects will generate more revenue than MTR's domestic operations by 2020 as the city's sole rail operator gears up for international expansion.

MTR wants more overseas projects, especially on the mainland, where it is promoting its rail-and-property model as a solution to debt-laden railway businesses. While Shenzhen's Metro Line 4 is now the only railway that has adopted this model, MTR said it was discussing with the Foshan and Guangzhou governments the building of an inter-city link where building costs would be subsidised by developments along the route.

Lincoln Leong, MTR's deputy chief executive, said there were more potential projects in the western and coastal regions of the mainland.

As more mainland cities look to the property financing model as an alternative to heavily subsidised rail projects, fewer new rail projects in Hong Kong would use the model. That is because any new lines extending the old Kowloon-Canton Railway (KCR) network must stay in the hands of the government.

The Northern Link and the Tuen Mun-Tsuen Wan Link now in the middle of public consultation, for example, will be funded and owned by the government, with MTR merely acting as a franchise operator.

While franchise operations offer higher returns in percentage terms, they generate lower earnings than projects built and run by MTR. As the State Council is looking for more sustainable ways to finance rail development and Premier Li Keqiang told his cabinet last Wednesday that inter-city and suburban lines would be open to private investors, the mainland could be a source of growth for MTR.

But Leong said Hong Kong would remain MTR's "bread and butter" market for a long time.

"The ebitda [earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation] margin of our local rail-and-station commercial operations exceeds 50 per cent, while our overseas projects, usually awarded to us in the form of franchises, have a margin of 3 to 5 per cent," he said.

Half of the 10 new rail projects planned for after 2015 - including the South Island Line (West) and the North Island Line - are not part of the old KCR network and can still remain under MTR's ownership.

That said, the mainland is an important market for MTR, especially considering that the rail-and-property model has allowed the company to get hold of valuable land in prime locations.

"On the mainland, most of the space above railway stations and depots is empty because it is not easy to put up a building there without expertise and know-how. That land will be wasted anyway if we don't use it," Leong said. "Now the government can use what we pay for the land to subsidise the railway's operation."

Unlike in Hong Kong, where development rights along the line are awarded as part of a rail project, the two require separate bidding on the mainland, although bidding is said to be "tailor-made" for the operator. For Shenzhen Line 4, MTR receives an annual subsidy of 520 million yuan (HK$658 million) for the line's operation and maintenance like other rail projects in the country. But unlike current practice, it bears the loss if the subsidy and fare income fail to cover expenses.

Analysts said separating the rail and property businesses would increase MTR's risk when such projects grew in number.

"In Hong Kong, MTR contracts out the property projects to developers, which pay for the construction costs and bear most of the risk. But under the mainland model, MTR literally becomes the developer," said Cusson Leung of Credit Suisse.

But he said it was natural for MTR to look for growth overseas, as he expected the firm's land bank in the city to be depleted by around 2020.

While MTR's rail lines in London, Stockholm, Melbourne and the mainland contributed HK$35.7 billion, or 35.8 per cent, of revenue last year, they made up less than 6 per cent of the corporation's bottom line. Leong said mainland and overseas projects would soon make up a bigger portion of earnings, with six more lines being bid on.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 04:31 PM   #487
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When are people going to start recognising the architect's tricks.

So many glossy rendrs of the future with seamless glass and white cladding - shapes that can't be built, stacks of transparent glass and transparent glass seen at an angle. If architects showed how their buildigns would actually look, with grey sky behind and glass as non-transparent as it really is, then no one would want to build their project.

I really worry that China is building an urban nightmare that will be realised as an impossibly expensive mistake in years to come - China isn't building cities, it's building colelctions of objects conencted by motorways and vast unmaintainable gardens. Just like the USSR but on an even bigger scale, China is buildigng cities that can't be maintained by ordinary means.

It's also building on a scale that only works when seen from a distance or from the air - expecting human beings to walk aroung on the ground in these places is nonsense. These cities are built for cars, not people which is the very definition of the word UNSUSTAINABLE.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 04:42 PM   #488
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See this article for more info on photoshop, deception and the lie that is the architectural render http://www.archdaily.com/383325/are-...-architecture/
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Old August 24th, 2013, 11:24 AM   #489
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Well, cities aren't just for cars. Without people where is the car? Plus China do have the most bicycles in total in the world. A lot of people in China actually like to walk, there is reasons streets like Beijing Street in Guangzhou is only for pedestrians. Think China is not going green? It doing a lot better than you think. Also sustainability means can it live on its own and stuff. If a city goes back to the old style where everybody grows their own food, clean their waste and ,etc. that would be sustainable. also if china is making an urban mistakes, why didn't london, nyc, or tokyo faces meltdowns? Yes they had hard times but they fixed them so being urban could be a bad and good thing to human beings.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 01:21 AM   #490
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steppenwolf View Post
When are people going to start recognising the architect's tricks.

So many glossy rendrs of the future with seamless glass and white cladding - shapes that can't be built, stacks of transparent glass and transparent glass seen at an angle. If architects showed how their buildigns would actually look, with grey sky behind and glass as non-transparent as it really is, then no one would want to build their project.

I really worry that China is building an urban nightmare that will be realised as an impossibly expensive mistake in years to come - China isn't building cities, it's building colelctions of objects conencted by motorways and vast unmaintainable gardens. Just like the USSR but on an even bigger scale, China is buildigng cities that can't be maintained by ordinary means.

It's also building on a scale that only works when seen from a distance or from the air - expecting human beings to walk aroung on the ground in these places is nonsense. These cities are built for cars, not people which is the very definition of the word UNSUSTAINABLE.
I'll put this into my 'epic nonsense posted on SSC' text file.

Btw, are you really from London as your location field indicates? And you talk of urban nightmare? in China? Are you sure you're not mixing anything up?
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Old August 25th, 2013, 02:28 AM   #491
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steppenwolf View Post
When are people going to start recognising the architect's tricks.

So many glossy rendrs of the future with seamless glass and white cladding - shapes that can't be built, stacks of transparent glass and transparent glass seen at an angle. If architects showed how their buildigns would actually look, with grey sky behind and glass as non-transparent as it really is, then no one would want to build their project.

I really worry that China is building an urban nightmare that will be realised as an impossibly expensive mistake in years to come - China isn't building cities, it's building colelctions of objects conencted by motorways and vast unmaintainable gardens. Just like the USSR but on an even bigger scale, China is buildigng cities that can't be maintained by ordinary means.

It's also building on a scale that only works when seen from a distance or from the air - expecting human beings to walk aroung on the ground in these places is nonsense. These cities are built for cars, not people which is the very definition of the word UNSUSTAINABLE.
I slightly agree with the words I highlighted in green, but i don't agree with the rest.
China isn't just building buildings, it is blindly building skyscrapers without even taking into account the aesthetics of these massive projects and how it will fit into the overall charm of the cityscape.

I noticed most of their tall buildings have mostly concrete on their coverings and few glass coverings (may have something to do with their cultural belief or religion, I don't know), I just hope they have a good reason for that, because it will cost them a lot of money to maintain.
In my opinion, concrete finish when exposed to the elements, reacts with the elements and give these buildings a rusty old look with time as opposed to glass or plastic.

Don't get me wrong, I love the massive projects going on in China. I just feel like they are making a mistake that would be too late to correct in decades to come.

Last edited by zilze; August 25th, 2013 at 03:08 AM.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 06:54 AM   #492
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zilze View Post
I slightly agree with the words I highlighted in green, but i don't agree with the rest.
China isn't just building buildings, it is blindly building skyscrapers without even taking into account the aesthetics of these massive projects and how it will fit into the overall charm of the cityscape.

I noticed most of their tall buildings have mostly concrete on their coverings and few glass coverings (may have something to do with their cultural belief or religion, I don't know), I just hope they have a good reason for that, because it will cost them a lot of money to maintain.
In my opinion, concrete finish when exposed to the elements, reacts with the elements and give these buildings a rusty old look with time as opposed to glass or plastic.

Don't get me wrong, I love the massive projects going on in China. I just feel like they are making a mistake that would be too late to correct in decades to come.
Fixed ...

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Old August 25th, 2013, 07:28 AM   #493
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zilze View Post
I slightly agree with the words I highlighted in green, but i don't agree with the rest.
China isn't just building buildings, it is blindly building skyscrapers without even taking into account the aesthetics of these massive projects and how it will fit into the overall charm of the cityscape.

I noticed most of their tall buildings have mostly concrete on their coverings and few glass coverings (may have something to do with their cultural belief or religion, I don't know), I just hope they have a good reason for that, because it will cost them a lot of money to maintain.
In my opinion, concrete finish when exposed to the elements, reacts with the elements and give these buildings a rusty old look with time as opposed to glass or plastic.

Don't get me wrong, I love the massive projects going on in China. I just feel like they are making a mistake that would be too late to correct in decades to come.
Light-coloured concrete is meant to reflect the sun's rays in hot, tropical areas. They will get grimy over time due to the high humidity throughout the year, but much better than glass reflecting and trapping sunlight and increasing the heat island effect and turning buildings into greenhouses.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 07:31 AM   #494
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What do you mean! All tall buildings now has glass covering outsides, what, Empire state building is not all covered with glass, you got a problem there? Old buildings are like that and shorter buildings. It might look like just plain concrete but on the outside they sometimes have what they cover the swimming pool floor stuff on the concrete walls. But i know its your opinion so I am not going to argue with it.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 07:51 AM   #495
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puppetgeneral View Post
What do you mean! All tall buildings now has glass covering outsides, what, Empire state building is not all covered with glass, you got a problem there? Old buildings are like that and shorter buildings. It might look like just plain concrete but on the outside they sometimes have what they cover the swimming pool floor stuff on the concrete walls. But i know its your opinion so I am not going to argue with it.
You need to look at climate. New York is nowhere as humid or hot as tropical China. Light-coloured concrete is far more effective in repelling sun back into the sky to keep buildings cool. Similarly, that's why there are very few brick buildings in this part of the world as bricks absorb heat and release it at night, adding to the heat island effect.

This is also why mass residentials continue to use concrete, rather than all-glass.

It's science.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 08:13 AM   #496
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My main point is that now china is going through a make over so we will have to see. Also buildings that finished recently now aren't showing just the concrete. But with a cover.
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Old August 28th, 2013, 09:49 AM   #497
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@hkskyline, Dark reflective glasses have less greenhouse effect than transparent glasses. Most of the skyscrapers in China are built with transparent glass. Reason, don't know???

You need to read this short article about the recent story of the Sheraton One Wall Center at Vancouver.
http://www.vancitybuzz.com/2013/02/o...-glass-facade/
The summary of the story is basically how the architects of the projects were forced to use a transparent glass to cover the upper part of the building because of some senseless bureaucratic law, that had no scientific basics.

I hope that is not the case currently going on in China.
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Old August 28th, 2013, 02:25 PM   #498
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zilze View Post
@hkskyline, Dark reflective glasses have less greenhouse effect than transparent glasses. Most of the skyscrapers in China are built with transparent glass. Reason, don't know???

You need to read this short article about the recent story of the Sheraton One Wall Center at Vancouver.
http://www.vancitybuzz.com/2013/02/o...-glass-facade/
The summary of the story is basically how the architects of the projects were forced to use a transparent glass to cover the upper part of the building because of some senseless bureaucratic law, that had no scientific basics.

I hope that is not the case currently going on in China.
I don't think people will appreciate the dark windows filtering out more natural lighting.
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Old September 29th, 2013, 08:36 AM   #499
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"Block" building in Guangzhou Haizhu District











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Old September 29th, 2013, 11:54 AM   #500
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Anyone know these projects?


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