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Old August 9th, 2006, 09:05 AM   #61
sd_urban
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDfan
Oh and Im looking for the redering of that Hillcrest Project...I lost it...So if anyone has it, post it and I will list it.
Here are some recent renderings of the controversial Hillcrest Project -








.....and more projects to add to your "Outside Downtown" list, SDfan


6th and Palm project adjacent to Balboa Park


Alicante in Bankers Hill recently topped out


Bad quality pic of National City's Revolution project by same developer of Embassy1414


National City's Cove at San Diego Bay proposal



**There's also the Monte Verde proposal in UTC with its four towers at 39-stories each. Not sure if this is still alive or not.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bushman61988
I personally hate the high rise tower's lack of color with the exposed concrete look, but how does everyone else like this tower?
I'm with you in hopes that this color pic I found of Park Terrace is still accurate
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Old August 9th, 2006, 06:48 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by octosd
thank goodness for the port and costal commission after looking at those pictures I was getting aprehensive.
Because of the Coastal Commission and Port of San Diego, our Bay is lined with parking lots, rental car lots, and heavy industry. They are the ones that restrict uses to tourism and maritime industry ONLY. Not for uses to benifit the population that lives along that coast.
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Old August 9th, 2006, 07:11 PM   #63
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Hey guys,
The model for the Navy Broadway Complex is up on the big model in CCDC. I'll post pictures tonight.
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Old August 9th, 2006, 10:22 PM   #64
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The last I heard about the Hillcrest project was that it was very likely to happen because of the public parking it was going to provide. Even NIMBY's have a price! hahaha

I really hope the project happens by the way, but I do hope they use materials other than just stucco - at least near the base. IMO, stucco is fine on Mediterranean homes, but it looks a little cheap on larger structures like that.
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Old August 10th, 2006, 01:04 AM   #65
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Great Editorial From the Daily Transcript:


Editorial: CCDC needs to get off the dime
Wednesday, August 9, 2006
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If ever there was a situation that demonstrates just how woefully the city of San Diego and many of its so-called leaders have fallen, it is the ongoing controversy over the U.S. Navy/Manchester Development Group plan for redevelopment of the Navy Broadway Complex.
Centre City Development Corp. needs to get off the dime, stop the delays and extended periods of study and give the green light to the Pacific Gateway project on the site of the Navy Broadway Complex.
The present agreement ends Jan. 1, 2007, and if the land falls into the Base Realignment and Closure system, everyone will lose. It is unlikely the city or any other local jurisdiction will ever regain meaningful "say" over how the land is to be used in the future.
The current CCDC board of directors seems to be contributing to, rather than seeking solutions for, the logjam that can doom a project vital to the interests of San Diego and the U.S. Navy.
Manchester Development Group, the entity selected by the Navy to carry out the project, has a successful record with similar sites exemplified by the Hyatt Grand Regency and Marriott Hotel. The projected total cost for the project is presently estimated to be in excess of $1.3 billion. When complete it will activate the western waterfront with pedestrian-scaled mixed-use ground-level retail along with entertainment, restaurants, museums and cultural facilities complementing its parks, hotels and office accommodations.
Some simply do not like Doug Manchester and do not want him or his company involved. They ignore the fact that the agreement gives the Navy the right to select the developer. Attempts to delay this project aim to make it financially difficult to proceed and potentially force Manchester's company to withdraw.
In recent posturing, members of the board and other interested parties seem to be ignoring the fact that the Navy Broadway Complex is federal land. In 1920, San Diego citizens voted by a 99.3 percent margin to grant the site to the Navy.
Local jurisdictions usually don't have as much input and say on development of federal land. It would not be surprising if the Navy now wishes it had not agreed in 1992 to give CCDC staff and directors (but NOT the City Council) the right to check ultimate development plans for agreement compliance. It is wise enough, however, to know that the agreement made 14 years ago must be upheld in good faith --- at least until Jan. 1, 2007.
CCDC needs to have the courage to act upon the fundamental reason why it and the Navy spent five years reaching their development agreement: The U.S. Navy wanted to maintain its command for this region on the site given to it by the voters of San Diego in 1920, and CCDC, acting on behalf of the San Diego City Council, wanted to participate in how the site would be redeveloped as well as keep the Navy command downtown.
This is the right project at the right time. CCDC is still charged with working on behalf of the City Council to remove blight in the Centre City Project area, and the Navy Broadway Complex is a poster child for blight. San Diegans still need and want jobs and an expansion of the local economy. The Navy still wants a state-of-the-art facility on its land, and is willing to approve a long-term lease with a private-sector developer to get that facility without cost to federal taxpayers. The hospitality sector still needs more hotel rooms to support the San Diego Convention Center, not to mention the cruise ship industry's necessity for an area to entertain the hundreds of thousands of visitors entering San Diego in the off season. San Diegans living downtown also need more retail. The North Embarcadero Visionary Plan is now far closer to realization than it was even a couple of years ago and this project will be the catalyst needed to make it a reality.
There is nothing basically wrong with the developer's solution. CCDC and other local government need to stand aside and let it happen.
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Old August 10th, 2006, 02:43 AM   #66
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The Vantage Point situation is just sad. It's probably one of the most impressive projects being built in SD and yet it can't seem to get going. I have to assume they're having some sort of supply chain problems. Does anyone have a clue as to why this project is ailing?
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Old August 10th, 2006, 04:15 AM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keg92101
Because of the Coastal Commission and Port of San Diego, our Bay is lined with parking lots, rental car lots, and heavy industry. They are the ones that restrict uses to tourism and maritime industry ONLY. Not for uses to benifit the population that lives along that coast.
Sarcasm.
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Old August 10th, 2006, 04:57 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hngcm
Sarcasm.
No sarcasm here. The only reason Manchester will be able to build office at NBC is because the Navy owns the land, and they trump the Coastal Commission and the Port.
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Old August 10th, 2006, 06:07 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charitorae
Hey guys,
The model for the Navy Broadway Complex is up on the big model in CCDC. I'll post pictures tonight.
It is? Good, hope those pictures come soon, thanks.

-------

Oh and thank you sd_urban for the pictures, I will post them on the list as soon as I can.
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Old August 11th, 2006, 10:20 AM   #70
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*waiting for charitorae's pics of the NBC model*

San Diego Metro:

Little Italy spectacularly achieves its ‘goals’
with housing, businesses and residents all prospering






When Italy played France for the World Cup in July, there was just one place in San Diego to be: in Little Italy, where 15,000 people packed India Street to watch the game on a Megatron screen brought in by the neighborhood association. “Little Italy is that kind of place,” says resident Pasquale Iolele. “It’s a neighborhood where people are full of life and embrace tradition.”

The neighborhood was born in the 19th century, when Italian tuna fishing families arrived. Early maps show nary a road in Mission Hills but carefully drawn streets from Ash to Laurel, east to the first ridge. The first fire station was built in 1906.

As the rest of San Diego filled in around it, tuna fishing gave way to commerce. About a third of the neighborhood was sacrificed to build Interstate 5 and much of what remained fell into an semi-industrial footprint, not quite Downtown and not quite Mission Hills. But it never lost its heritage, signaled to the world by the family-owned restaurants along India Street and Our Lady of the Rosary Church on the corner of State and Date streets.





Little Italy’s fishing heritage is reflected on sidewalk banners.


In the last seven years, the neighborhood has grown and changed. Where parking lots, tire stores and car dealers stood, new businesses and condominium developments are springing up. Already a haven for artists and galleries, the bayside neighborhood attracted designers and architects as well as thousands of new residents who’ve snapped up the modern, quirky condominiums as fast as they hit the market.

“The spiritual base hasn’t changed,” says Marco LiMandri, chairman of the Little Italy Association. “But we have more public spaces and more public art than before, we have view corridors so we can always feel the presence of the bay and there’s more to come.”

For the past five years, people have moved into the neighborhood in droves, into nearly 2,000 new condominiums and townhouses that are part of the Centre City Development Corp.’s revitalization of Downtown. Hundreds more are slated for construction by the end of 2007.

Ecco Lofts, 10 homes designed for usable space, came online in March. A few remain available, reports Judy Finkbiner, the manager of Columbo Venture LLC. “There’s a lot of interest because of the neighborhood – it’s such a great place to live,” Finkbiner says.

The changes are blending well with the community character.

“The whole area has changed dramatically but what has stayed constant is the sense of neighborhood,” Finkbiner says. “We still have a large Italian population and a large live-and-work population, so it stays really comfortable, with people watching out for each other and great walkability.”

The boom has drawn a dozen new restaurants and invigorated the ones already there. Filippi’s, one of the longest standing Italian restaurants on India Street, has hungry people waiting in even longer lines for those red-checkered tablecloths and marinara sauce on weekends. The Busalacchis have opened new restaurants and the peak hours at Mimmo’s Italian Village have shifted from lunch to include the growing dinner crowd.





CityMark Development LLC and CLB Partners will break ground in the next few months on Pier, a condominium development designed by Martinez + Cutri.


And the neighborhood is alive with events. On Kettner Boulevard, The Arts & Design District sponsors Kettner Nights, a party with shops. San Diego ArtWalk has found its footing in Little Italy, and the neighborhood is now home to the Italian Festa in the fall and Carnevale in the spring. It has its own bocce ball tournament and stickball league.

“We make sure our events promote and celebrate the character of the neighborhood,” Di Landri says.

Residents lay the credit for much of that sense of neighborhood, and the impressive advances towards the feeling of openness and warmth in the neighborhood to the Little Italy Association. “This is about their hard work and amazing planning,” Iolele says. “It doesn’t feel overpopulated, and it’s the kind of place where you want to hang out, where your friends want to come and visit.”

In the next few months, CityMark Development LLC and CLB Partners will break ground on Pier, the firm’s third condominium development in Little Italy.

The building follows the Downtown trend of mixed use, retail on the ground floors and residence above; that’s based on the way old European cities are built. But it has a distinctly modern look; two towers that will hold 230 units and 10,500 square feet of retail space. Designed by Martinez + Cutri, Pier will have three distinct areas, all reminiscent of cargo ships, the pier and sailboats that dot the bay in its sight lines.





Russ Haley, principal of CityMark, which broke ground last year on Aperture, an 11-story, mixed-use condominium building in Little Italy.


“It’s a landmark building inspired by the bay and the tradition of this great neighborhood,” says CityMark principal Russ Haley. “We have a lot invested in this community and Pier will be our absolute signature building.”

Pier will rise at the site of the old Metro Volkswagen Audi dealership, on Kettner between Fir and Grape streets. To the west, residents will have a view of the landmark County Administration Building and a front seat for the development of the North Embarcadero project, an effort of the city, county and Port that will transform the waterfront in a more pedestrian friendly environment. The Trolley and Amtrak stations are within a few blocks.

CityMark finished Doma, a seven-story condominium building on Kettner between Date and Fir streets, in 2003 and broke ground last year on Aperture, an 11-story, mixed-use condominium building.

It is among a dozen developers, including K. Hovnanian Associates, which built Acqua Vista, Lennar Communities and Camden Development, that have built apartments and condos in the neighborhood since 2000.

While the change seemed sudden, it started with a small gesture that thrust a secret favorite of locals onto a larger stage.





The condo development on Kettner Boulevard, across the street from the site of CityMark’s Pier building site.


In 1999, the Little Italy sign went up over India Street as the neighborhood announced itself to the world. Since then, the look of India and Kettner streets has changed from a commercial corridor to a charming group of shops, restaurants and galleries that force a passerby to linger.

LiMandri convinced Little Italy residents to assess themselves and fund the neighborhood association in 1997, and then went back for more a few years later. The association has been powerful and effective, convincing developers and donors to fund construction of four piazzas — so far.

“It’s amazing to see what the association has done in the last decade,” Haley says. “The incredible amount of work done really contributes to the fiber of the neighborhood. And the meetings are great because the established members are welcoming the new people and new ideas.”

The quick work to get the World Cup broadcast party in place was the epitome of a committed and effective neighborhood. “In a couple days — just a couple of days — they got permits to shut down India Street, got that huge screen, set up sound and security and vendors, and created this incredible small town atmosphere for the game,” Haley says.





The Little Italy sign on India Street was erected in 1999.


In 2003, the association broke ground on Piazza Basilone, dedicated to the local boys who never came home from the wars of the 20th Century, LiMandri says. Named for Medal of Honor hero John Basilone, who died in World War II, it is one of the neighborhood’s four piazzas in four blocks along India Street.

Besides the art, trees and fountains, the lovely spaces are full of inviting places to sit and stroll — and that’s one of the most common pastimes in the neighborhood.

“I want people to walk down Little Italy streets and have every step be an experience,” LiMandri says. “We are doing things like hanging flower baskets and building piazzas so our neighborhood remains a place to stop and chat, to know your neighbors, to be glad you live here. Before we’re done, you’ll see chairs on every corner, you’ll see landscaping on every corner, you’ll see hanging plants on every corner. Every step we take, every idea we bring in is to make this more of a neighborhood.”
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Old August 11th, 2006, 10:35 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbaumberger
The reason for the "I told you so" is my guess two years ago that for a condo project to get built it needed to get out of the ground by June '06, and it looks like that's exactly what's happening. So say goodbye to Embassy, 445 West Ash and all the other condos still on the boards.
No Not Embassy!

Seriously though, I wouldn't go too far as to say that they are totally 100 %scrapped. I would think that they're maybe laying low, waiting for the next mini-boom to happen. They have too much invested into downtown SD to just tear up plans and walk away (too many empty lots to just ignore as well). I'm sure that the developers have seen Downtown SD's potential to be a truly great world class CBD. IMO both the Navy Broadway Complex and the Ballpark Village will set off more interest into more development just as Petco Park did (probably not in the same magnitude).
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Old August 11th, 2006, 11:54 AM   #72
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The Busalacchi's is in Little Italy???? Nah uh, it's in Hillcrest.

I never forgave Little Italy for putting up that sign, what a copy cat! The sign distinction should only be given to the four originals(5, some say) in the uptown area.
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Old August 11th, 2006, 06:24 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mongozx
Seriously though, I wouldn't go too far as to say that they are totally 100 %scrapped. I would think that they're maybe laying low, waiting for the next mini-boom to happen. They have too much invested into downtown SD to just tear up plans and walk away (too many empty lots to just ignore as well). I'm sure that the developers have seen Downtown SD's potential to be a truly great world class CBD. IMO both the Navy Broadway Complex and the Ballpark Village will set off more interest into more development just as Petco Park did (probably not in the same magnitude).
The downtown condo market is over - the next mini-boom in hotels is already well under way, and the next mini-boom will probably be mostly office buildings (if we are lucky). I just can't see the condo market recovering any time soon, and in the meantime the best locations will be gobbled up by newer proposals that actually pencil out. IMO neither NBC or BV are going to happen, at least as currently envisioned - but that may be more than I can elaborate on in one post. Condotels are condos, and the California Coastal Commission will never let these "hotels" get built at NBC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by keg92101
On the contrary, G Lofts East will still be built. OM is only building rental stock and they have a ZERO land base on that project. CCDC's website is incorrect calling that project a condo project. OM just takes a long time to do anything, and last I checked, that project will break ground soon, only because it is a rental. If you take the land base out of any project, it easily pencils. The problem now is that all the land is now being marketted by land brokers as highest and best use as luxury condos, even though everyone knows, without a following, like Bosa has, they won't necessarily sell. I would agree that all other projects are dead, for now, except for the one's that are built with no land base, or they can get the financing (Bosa's Bayside, Pacific & E, and Citymark's Pier). But, at the same time, when you read that Mcmillan just bought a 10k lot for 5.5 million to build condos, I can't see it dying, and them tying up that kind of money for the market to cycle. We'll just have to wait and see.
Well that would obviously be great news if OM is still moving on G Lofts. The whole time I worked on the project with AVRP it was designed to be a for-sale building, and then suddenly went on hold earlier this year. I did hear that KMA had picked up the project (which makes sense if it is being converted to rentals), but my source at AVRP told me that the project was dead Laundry-Lofts-style. But kudos to OM if they can pull it off - that block is in really bad shape, and it seems like a good project for the neighborhood.

Oh, and you can add Strata to the cancelled list BTW.



I'm going to go on a little bit of a rant here about the SD vs. Vancouver comparison. In the photo above, THERE ARE NO CARS. As has been said here before, this type of development cannot take place in San Diego because of the Port and the CCC. As a result SD is failing to capitalize on its natural assets. Before we can envision a downtown San Diego that looks and feels similar to Vancouver, we need to envision a radically-remodeled (if not scrapped) Port and California Coastal Commission.

Here is a quote from Larry Beasley, codirector of planning for Vancouver - it seemed especially relevant to the NBC discussion:
"The following are basic ingredients combined to create a balanced, sustainable society: rapid transport infrastructure, enabling inhabitants to commute by foot rather than car, preserving a relatively low-density environment, and ensuring that the right balance of civic governance and growth management is struck so that "the city is planned by the city and not the developers." Urban Land - July 2006

Here are some photos of mine from April 2005:




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Last edited by sbaumberger; August 11th, 2006 at 08:31 PM.
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Old August 11th, 2006, 08:16 PM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbaumberger
Here are some photos of mine from April 2005:




Great pics...Vancouver is such a gorgeous city!

I realize some folks don't like Vancouver's architecture and/or how so many of the buildings look alike, but I REALLY LOVE that look. I doubt San Diego's skyline would ever end up looking like the above photos because there seems to already be a lot more variety in building appearances, but if it did, I don't think it would be the end of the world at all. Worse things could happen, ya know. 

I'm also anxious to see the NBC model photos. I really like how that project had turned out and I hope everyone can get their crap together enough to get the project approved.
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Old August 12th, 2006, 05:27 AM   #75
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hngcm- Im not on SSP (can't get an account) but thankfully I read that forum at least

Heres the link to the article you wanted on the I-15 railway:

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2006..._276_26_06.txt
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Old August 12th, 2006, 05:28 AM   #76
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sbaumberger, could you make a list of all of the cancelled projects in downtown for us?
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Old August 12th, 2006, 06:26 AM   #77
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How 'bout some San Diego?
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=112908
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Old August 13th, 2006, 08:15 AM   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDfan
hngcm- Im not on SSP (can't get an account) but thankfully I read that forum at least

Heres the link to the article you wanted on the I-15 railway:

http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2006..._276_26_06.txt

Why not?

And it be cool if they can get that off the ground, seeing how HSR isn't going anywhere soon...
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Old August 14th, 2006, 06:51 AM   #79
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Here's a small rendering of the latest version of library Tower. I think it looks more interesting than the previous one -




Library Tower was granted redesign approval. Located on the north side of K St between Park Blvd and 13th. (East Village – Lower East Side)

Overview: 41-story tower with a 3-story base and a 6-story building; 38’ and 478’ in height; 158 market-rate and 16 affordable condominiums; 1-, 2-, 3-bedroom units; 10,680 square feet of ground floor retail; 322 parking spaces, including 6 guest spaces, in a 4-level underground garage.

Due to the two fault lines that traverse the site, the building is a tall, slender, rectangular shape. Large expansive light green glass windows with projecting and recessed balconies add depth to this contemporary structure.

A 6-story affordable housing building is punctuated with red and gold colored concrete, purple metal facades, glass canopies, and a metal trellis.

Both the tower and 6-story building offer roof top amenities for residents. And, for the pet lover, a dog park is incorporated within the project.

Last edited by sd_urban; August 14th, 2006 at 07:13 AM.
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Old August 14th, 2006, 06:52 AM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hngcm
Why not?

And it be cool if they can get that off the ground, seeing how HSR isn't going anywhere soon...
They don't accept hotmail, yahoo or gmail accounts anymore. Their loss.

Yeah it would be, the mountians are a big problem though. Cost wise at least.
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