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Old August 20th, 2006, 05:42 AM   #21
Lss911
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Portugal has some of the best in Europe!

I just love Regaleira!!
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Old August 20th, 2006, 05:52 AM   #22
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I love all
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Old August 20th, 2006, 05:57 AM   #23
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beautiful palaces

the portuguese ones are fantastic
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Old August 20th, 2006, 06:11 AM   #24
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of course!!
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Old August 20th, 2006, 01:31 PM   #25
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Palaces of Spain, heres a bunch of palaces in Spain, i love the diversity in styles, from hapsburg, to italianate, to french baroque, to medieval, to islamic. Not alot of places to see that.

Royal Palace of Madrid: this is lavish italianate palace is the largest in western europe, and is one of the best decorated as well. Has the foremost collections of tapestries, armor, and stradivarius instruments in the world.







El Escorial This huge palace was made by Felipe II in memorial to his favorite saint, St Lawrence. This building was central in moving spanish architecture in a more austere direction. The Library is second only to the Vaticans in its holdings and there are over 7000 reliquaries from different saints in this massive palace-church-monastary complex.






Aranjuez A large pleasure palace to the north of Madrid with a wonderful collection of fountains and gardens, famous for its popular concierto by Joaquin.






La Granja built by the first bourbon king of spain to emulate his grandfathers Versailles. Incredible fountains run in every direction of this wonderful pleasure palace that was severely damaged in a big fire, but rebuilt.







El Pardo- formerly a hunting lodge, this regal residence is befitting any king and hosts leaders of nations on their trips to Spain.




Alcazar de Seville this wonderful moorish palace is a physical work of islamic art and is still used today. It has a spectacular central garden with fountains.









La Almudena the oldest continually royal residence in europe.




La AlhambraThe Red Fortress, this palace needs no introduction, consider one of the wonders of the world and one of islams greatest works of art. there is also a wonderful renaissance palace built for charles V in the center, despite some unwarranted destruction of a part of this fortress.





Palacio Magdalena a northern seaside pleasure palace.




Plaza De Villa


Riofrio palace


Alcazar



Alcazar de Toledo



Palacio Linares


Palacio Longoria



Santa Cruz Palace


Astorga PalaceGaudis fabulous palace




Palacio Liria


Boadillo del Monte

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Old August 20th, 2006, 04:05 PM   #26
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Vienna again

The city palace of the Habsburger, the Hofburg.
This is a huge complex making up a significant part of the inner city of Vienna (together with the attached parcs)

An overview:



The dark red structure is the Hofburg. The light red buildings are Museums in the same style like the newer parts of the Hofburg.






Burgtor, the gates to the Hofburg (former city wall gate)






To get an idea of dimensions, have a look at the two cars on the left side




also part of the complex


Butterfly house, also part of the Hofburg
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Old August 21st, 2006, 12:16 PM   #27
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A few from Copenhagen Denmark

Amalienborg Palace - home to the Royal Family most of the year






Frederiksberg Palace in Copenhagen




Rosenborg Palace - Home to the Crown Jewels
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Old November 25th, 2006, 04:01 PM   #28
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Stockholm









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Old November 25th, 2006, 07:46 PM   #29
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The Grand palace, Bangkok











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Old November 25th, 2006, 09:37 PM   #30
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Italy has a lot of Palaces/Castles (Florence,Turin,Naples,Milan,Venice,Parma,Rome,Ferrara,Bologna etc....) because before 1861 Italy was made up of several states so every king/pope/prince/duke/doge needed its own residence.

ROYAL PALACE OF CASERTA - NAPLES,ITALY

The Caserta Palace, in Italian Palazzo Reale di Caserta, is a palace and former Royal residence in Caserta, near Naples, once used by the Kings of Naples. It was the largest palace and probably the largest building erected in Europe in the 18th century. In 1996, the Palace of Caserta was listed among the World Heritage Sites on the ground that it was "the swan song of the spectacular art of the Baroque, from which it adopted all the features needed to create the illusions of multidirectional space".
The construction of the palace was begun in 1752 for Charles VII of Naples, who worked closely with his architect Luigi Vanvitelli. When King Charles saw Vanvitelli's grandly-scaled model for Caserta it filled him with emotion "fit to tear his heart from his breast".



























































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Old November 25th, 2006, 09:49 PM   #31
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ROYAL PALACE OF NAPLES,ITALY

Its construction begun in 1600 and the general project was given to one of the most famous architects of that time, Domenico Fontana.





























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Old November 25th, 2006, 10:02 PM   #32
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PALAZZINA DI STUPINIGI - TURIN,ITALY

The Palazzina of Stupinigi is one of the Residences of the Royal House of Savoy, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list. It is located in Stupinigi, a suburb of the town of Nichelino, 10 km southwest of Turin.
The original castle was owned by the Acaja line of the House of Savoy, and was sold to marquis Rolando Pallavicino in 1493. It was then acquired by Emmanuel Philibert in 1563, when the ducal capital was moved from Chambéry to Turin.
The new palace was designed by the architect Filippo Juvarra to be used as a palazzina di caccia ("hunting lodge") for Vittorio Amedeo II, King of Sardinia. Works started in 1729 .


















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Old November 25th, 2006, 10:17 PM   #33
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DOGE'S PALACE,VENICE

The Doge's Palace (Italian Palazzo Ducale) is a gothic palace in Venice.
The current palace was largely constructed from 1309 to 1424 on 9th century origins, designed perhaps by Filippo Calendario. Giovanni and Bartolomeo Buon created the so-called Porta della Carta, a monumental late-gothic gate on the Piazzetta side of the palace.

















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Old November 25th, 2006, 10:58 PM   #34
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ROYAL PALACE OF TURIN,ITALY (1660)




































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Old November 26th, 2006, 02:14 AM   #35
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Russia has beatiful palaces,yet there are no pictures
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Old November 26th, 2006, 02:31 AM   #36
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PALACE OF KNOSSOS, GREECE
1700BC
ITS SO OLD!





































[/QUOTE]
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Old November 26th, 2006, 04:15 PM   #37
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ROYAL PALACE OF CAPODIMONTE IN NAPLES,ITALY

The Palace and Museum of Capodimonte (Italian Museo di Capodimonte) is a grand Bourbon palazzo in Naples, Italy, formerly the summer residence of the kings of the Two Sicilies.
It was built at the command of Charles VII, king of Naples and Sicily (later Charles III, king of Spain) and started in 1738 after a design by Giovanni Antonio Medrano, who was also the architect of Naples' beautiful opera house, the Teatro San Carlo. King Charles built it expressly to house the fabulous Farnese art collection which he had inherited from his mother, Elisabetta Farnese, last descendant of the sovereign ducal family of Parma.

Now it houses the main museum and art gallery of the city.The first and second floors house the Galleria Nazionale (National Gallery), with paintings from the 13th to the 18th centuries including major works by Simone Martini, Titian, Caravaggio,Giovanni Bellini, Sandro Botticelli,Annibale Carracci, Artemisia Gentileschi, Francisco Goya,Masaccio,El Greco,flemish painters,etc.




























The porcelain room





The park is huge


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Old November 26th, 2006, 04:51 PM   #38
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THE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS, ROYAL PALACES.

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Old November 26th, 2006, 05:28 PM   #39
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THE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS, ROYAL PALACES (PART (II)



The Loo palace, Apeldoorn.

History
The royal residence Het Loo near Apeldoorn, Netherlands, was built starting in 1684 for the Stadtholder Willem, known to English-language readers as William III of Orange and his consort Mary II Stuart, who became King and Queen of England in 1689.

For over three hundred years, Het Loo was the summer residence of the House of Orange, which became the Dutch royal family.

The Dutch Baroque architecture of Het Loo takes pains to minimize the grand stretch of its construction, so emphatic at Versailles, and present itself as just a fine gentleman's residence. Het Loo is not a palace but, as the title of its engraved portrait (illustration, below) states, a "Lust-hof" (a retreat, or "pleasure house"). Nevertheless, it is situated entre cour et jardin ("between court and garden") as Versailles and its imitators, and even as fine Parisian private houses are. The dry paved and gravelled court, lightly screened from the road by a wrought-iron grill, is domesticated by a traditional plat of box-bordered green, the homey touch of a cross in a circle you'd find in a bougeois garden. The volumes of the palace are rhythmically broken in their massing. They work down symmetrically, expressing the subordinate roles of their use and occupants, and the final outbuildings in Marot's plan extend along the public thoroughfare, like a well-made and delightfully regular street.

Gardens by Daniel Marot
The "Great Garden" lies privately behind. This Dutch Baroque Garden, when miscalled the "Versailles of Holland" serves to show more differences than similarities, still within the Baroque general formula established by André Le Nôtre: perfect symmetry, axial layout with radiating gravel walks, parterres with fountains, basins and statues. The garden as it appears in the engraving (illustration) was designed by Le Nôtre's nephew, Claude Desgotz[1]. In his military and diplomatic career, William of Orange was the European opponent of Louis XIV, the commander of the combined forces countering those of absolute power and Roman Catholicism. André Le Nôtre's main axis at Versailles, continued by the canal, runs up to the horizon. Daniel Marot and Desgotz's Het Loo garden does not dominate the landscape as Louis' German imitators do, though in his idealized plan (engraving, left), Desgotz extends the axis. The main garden, with conservative rectangular beds instead of more elaborately shaped ones, is an enclosed space surrounded by raised walks, as a Renaissance garden might be, tucked into the woods for private enjoyment, the garden not of a king but a stathouder. At its far end a shaded crosswalk of trees disguised the central vista. The orange trees set out in wooden boxes and wintered in an Orangery, which were a feature of all gardens, did double duty for the House of Orange.

Outside the garden there are a few straight scenic avenues, for following the hunt in a carriage, or purely for the vista afforded by an avenue. Few of the "green rooms" cut into the woodlands in imitation of the cabinets de verdure of Versailles that are shown in the engraving actually got executed at Het Loo.

The patron of the Sun King's garden was Apollo. Peter the Great would opt for Samson, springing the jaws of Sweden's heraldic lion. William opted for Hercules.

In the 18th century, William III’s baroque garden as seen in the engraving was swept away for a landscape park in the English taste.

Restoration of the garden at Het Loo

In 1960 Queen Wilhelmina declared that when she died the palace would go to the State. It did in 1962, when Wilhelmina died at Het Loo Palace. After a thorough restoration it now houses a national museum and library devoted to the House of Orange-Nassau in Dutch history. Het Loo also now houses the Museum van de Kanselarij der Nederlandse Orden (Museum of the Chancery of the Netherlands Orders of Knighthood), and books and other material concerning decorations and medals form a separate section in the library.

The lost gardens of Het Loo were fully restored starting in 1970, in time to celebrate its tricentennial in 1984. Its new brickwork, trelliswork and ornaments are as raw as they must have been in 1684 and will mellow with time.




Royal stables










Koning Willem I



Dam palace, amsterdam



The Royal Palace in Amsterdam (Koninklijk Paleis te Amsterdam in Dutch) is one of the palaces in the Netherlands which is at the disposal of Queen Beatrix by Act of Parliament. It is situated in the west side of Dam Square in the centre of Amsterdam, opposite the War Memorial and next to the Nieuwe Kerk.

It was built by Jacob van Campen, who took control of the construction project in 1648, as the Town Hall for the City of Amsterdam, and was built on 13,659 wooden piles. It was opened on 20th July 1655 by the leaders of the city. The interiors, focusing on the power and prestige of Amsterdam, were completed later (mainly by Rembrandt and Ferdinand Bol).

After the patriot revolution which swept the House of Orange from power a decade earlier, the new Batavian Republic was forced to accept Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, brother of Napoleon Bonaparte, as King of Holland in 1806. After holding his court at The Hague and Utrecht, Louis Napoleon moved to Amsterdam, and converted the Town Hall into a royal palace for himself.

The King of Holland did not have long to appreciate his new palace. He abdicated on the 2 July 1810, and the Netherlands was annexed by France. The palace then became home to the French governor, Charles François Lebrun.

Prince William VI (son of Prince William V of Orange), returned to the Netherlands in 1813, after Napoleon fell from power, and restored the palace to its original owners. After his investiture as King William I of the Netherlands, however, Amsterdam was made the official capital of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands (the seats of government being Brussels and The Hague). The new King realised the importance of having a palace in the capital, and the Town Hall again became a royal palace.

It was made property of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in 1936, and is used by the Queen for entertaining and hosting official functions, such as state visits, the New Year reception, and the presentations of the Erasmus, Royal Grant to Painting and Prince Claus prizes.





Noordeinde palace, Den Haag.

Noordeinde Palace is one of the official palaces of the Dutch royal family. Located in The Hague in the province of South Holland, it has been used as the "working palace" for Queen Beatrix since 1984.

The palace originally started as a medieval farmhouse, which was converted into a spacious residence by the steward of the States of Holland, Willem van de Goudt in 1533. The original farmhouse's cellars can still be seen in the palace basement.





Noordeinde PalaceThe gardens of the palace are open to the public.

Huis ten Bosch palace, Den Haag

Huis ten Bosch is one of the official palaces of the Dutch Royal Family, located in The Hague in the Netherlands. It has been home to Queen Beatrix since 1981. The other royal palace in The Hague, Noordeinde Palace, is used for work-related purposes.

Construction of Huis ten Bosch was begun on September 2, 1645, under the direction of Bartholomeus Drijffhout[1], and to a design by Pieter Post and Jacob van Campen. It was commissioned by Queen Elizabeth of Bohemia who was then living in exile with her husband. When completed, the palace became the summer home of Stadholder Frederik Hendrik of Orange and his wife, Amalia von Solms.

After her husband's death in 1647, Amalia dedicated the Palace to her husband. Led by architect Jacob van Campen, major artists of the day such as Gerard van Honthorst, Jacob Jordaens and Jan Lievens filled the Oranjezaal ("Orange Room" ) with paintings glorifying the late prince. The dining room was designed by Daniel Marot.

Over the next century and a half, the palace would change possession from the Nassau family, the king of Prussia, and many Stadholders until the French invaded in 1795. They gave the palace to the Batavian (Dutch) people who still own it to this day. Napoleon Bonaparte's brother, Louis Napoleon, king of the Netherlands briefly lived in the palace between 1805 and 1807.

When William I was proclaimed King of the Netherlands, he made Huis ten Bosch one of his official residences. It became a favourite location for many members of the Royal Family, and during World War I it became the primary residence of Queen Wilhelmina.

The Queen and her family were forced to flee the palace for England (and from there to Canada) when the German army invaded the Netherlands during World War II. The Nazi administration planned to demolish the palace, but the comptroller convinced them not to. However, the palace was damaged beyond habitation.

Between 1950 and 1956, the palace was restored and once again became a royal residence. It became the prime residence once more in 1981.

The palace has undergone major reconstructions since it is was built. Currently, it consists of a central part with two long wings, spanning approximately 110 m from end to end.





Soestdijk palace, Baarn/Soest


Last edited by Nemo; November 26th, 2006 at 05:39 PM.
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Old November 26th, 2006, 05:37 PM   #40
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Im wonderling tha till now no one posted Schloss Neuschwanstein ?
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