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Old October 3rd, 2009, 05:43 PM   #741
Caras2134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lig.Aya View Post
speaking of earthquakes and fire...can BGC structures survive the 7 something intensity?

and where is the fire station located at? do we have firetrucks that can reach upper levels of high rise buildings?

just wondering how "prepared" BGC is ...with all these disasters happening here and around our country. (God help us)
The highest building being built right now is in Taipeh, China, 510 meters high roughly equivalent to 100 floors approx., the 2nd highest which is existing (used to be the highest before) is Petronas Building in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Approx 452 meters, roughly equivalent to 88 floors approx.. There is a race now among our structural engineers who can build the highest building.
Going back to your question can those structures at BGC (average height of buildings at BGC around 50 floors or storey) withstand a 7 intensity quake. A 7 intensity quake is quite devastating, the Northridge Quake in Ca.,USA (1994) is just 6.7, (center is Reseda City where one of the major faultline , San Andreas is located ), aprrox 60 people died, the Golden Bridge collapsed, Freeway 14 also collapsed , and there are quite numbers of buildings in California which gave way. In Indonesia , the recent earthquake this October 1 is about 7.6 but happened in one urbanized area, lots of building got flattened out and thousand died, Indonesia lies in one of the major faultline in the world.
We don't have any major faultline here in the Philippines, that is what I know, correct me if you may. But if we have an intensity 7 quake, you will be safer staying on those new condos, rather than staying on those old buildings in Avenida Rizal, Ayala Ave, Makati ave, Carriedo, Buendia. Believe me those old buildings will show more structural damage first than the new ones.
As to your question about the Fire fighting capability of our Fire Department. The truth is our fire fighting equipments are far behind compared to U.S.

Last edited by Caras2134; October 6th, 2009 at 12:05 AM.
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Old October 3rd, 2009, 11:22 PM   #742
3cr
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It's the (portion of the upper lane of the) Bay Bridge and not the Golden Gate Bridge that collapsed in the SF earthquake...

Btw there are lots of earthquake faults in the Philippines as well,
the Markinia Faultline being one of the major ones...
Here's one of those studies made about it...
Hope it helps...

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCUD. View Post

Here's the map of the West Line of Marikina Valley Fault System from PHIVOLCS,



and here are the areas above it
‘Big One’ Is Possible But Metro Is Unprepared
BY AUBREY STA. CRUZ MAKILAN

Here’s something that the country’s national leaders should be bothered about: If a major earthquake were to hit Metro Manila today, the devastation would be so big even disaster response authorities cannot simply cope with it. And it even looks like disaster preparedness occupies a low priority among officials down to the municipal level.

Recent reports gathered by Bulatlat show that up to 35,000 residents of Metro Manila would die and up to three million others would need to be evacuated. In addition, some 175,000 buildings would be damaged. The pressure of collapsed buildings and the inability to rescue those who would be trapped inside would cause most of the deaths.


Distribution of active faults and trenches in the Philippines

With its current population of 10 million, Metropolitan Manila, which is composed of 13 cities and four municipalities, is densely populated with several clusters and districts having high-rise buildings close to each other. Investigations done by various disaster units and fire departments a few years ago found many buildings did not comply with construction standards and that these are prone not only to fires but also to damage by earthquakes of any scale.

One of the reports gathered by Bulatlat, the Metropolitan Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS), cites “many research studies (indicating) that active phases of the (West) Valley Faults (formerly the Marikina Valley Faults) are approaching and that the estimated magnitude will be around 7 or more.” But MMEIRS also raised the possible intensity from 7 to even 9, which could be “devastating.”

The study projected the “big earthquake” to be “unlike any tragedy seen or imagined in Metro Manila.”

Asked for comment, however, a scientist-environmentalist theorized that such studies could be pressing the panic button now just to allow certain insurance companies to profit from a sudden surge of building insurance orders and the like.


Largest impact

MMEIRS, a Japan-funded study that was begun in August 2002, identified the West Valley Fault, which lies just northeast of Manila, as “the fault expected to cause the largest impact in the metropolis.” The West Valley Fault traverses Marikina town, Pasig going to Muntinlupa up to the south.

The Fault, other studies showed, caused at least two major earthquakes within the last 1,400 years. No earthquake is known to have taken place along the West Valley Fault after the 16th century. But based on the estimated return period of less than 500 years, the Fault is due to exhibit dangers this century – or even within the next few years, if the estimates of an official of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) are valid.

Dr. Norman Tungol of Phivolcs’ Geology, Geophysics, Research and Development Division (GGRDD) estimated the Fault’s movement of recurrence at 200-400 years and based on this, he told Bulatlat, it is due for another movement.

Tungol said however that since studies have a big margin of error, this projection “could be within the next few years, (or) few tens of years.” He also said that even if there is no need for the people to panic because there is no timetable yet, “dapat mag-prepare because it’s inevitable.”

He confirmed that an earthquake with intensity 8 or 9 could be expected in the Valley Fault with a possible magnitude of 7.2 because of the lengthy fault.

Another Phivolcs scientist, Dr. Elena Bautista, noted however that the MMEIRS study found no pattern for the frequency of earthquakes occurring in the West Valley Fault.

A noted engineer, Dr. Arthur Saldivar-Sali, saw MMEIRS’ assertion that “active phases of the Valley Faults are approaching” as vague. He noted that the study, which he admits he has never seen, was apparently based on “deterministic analysis” which focuses on the characteristics of the movement of a fault and can be a prejudgment based on studies done or merely on gut feel that has no scientific basis at all.

Saldivar-Sali is a member of the Council of Engineering Consultants of the Philippines (Cecophil), a group of corporations and companies doing civil engineering designs and foundations.


Probability theory

Saldivar-Sali, a former UP professor who is also now with the Geo-Technica Consultancy Group, told Bulatlat that he tends to believe in the “probability analysis” of former Phivolcs Director Raymundo Punongbayan. Shortly after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in 1991, Punongbayan told of a higher probability of a major earthquake on the Valley Fault based on its rare movements. Since lesser energy is released in the friction of rocks, more energy is stored, like a rubber band, preparing for a big snap.

The higher the percentage of the probability of an earthquake, the dangerous it would be, Saldivar-Sali said.

Punongbayan also cited the danger of building anything five kms near the fault. The director’s warning caused alarm among the business community and Marikina local officials asked that the fault be renamed “West Valley Fault” instead.


In layman’s terms, a magnitude of 7.2 can be compared to a bomb explosion, Saldivar-Sali said. In exponential form of 10, a magnitude of 1 is equivalent to one ton (1 x 100), magnitude 2 to 10 tons (2 x 101), 3 to 300 tons (3 x 102), and so on. A 7.2 magnitude if multiplied to 106 is equivalent to 7.2 million tons of bomb explosion.

MMEIRS actually aimed to design a master plan for earthquake impact reduction in Metro Manila leading to the holding of training seminars on earthquake preparedness. Funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA-Philippines), the study was supported by the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA), the Department of Science and Technology (DoST), Phivolcs and JICA contractors Pacific Consultants International, Oyo Corporation, and Pasco Corporation.

Scientists from Phivolcs, the University of the Philippines as well as from Japan participated in the study. Due for completion last March, the report is being finalized in Japan, according to Cora Macasieb, Special Operations Officer II and acting division chief of the Directorate for Special Operations of the Metropolitan Manila Disaster Coordinating Council (MMDCC).

Separate studies on earthquake are also being done in cooperation with China, Japan and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP).

Among others, three areas were tested under the MMEIRS study: Mataas na Lupa in Malate, Manila; Ugong, Pasig; and Cupang, Marikina. Studied were Metro Manila’s three fault lines, namely, the West Valley Fault, the Manila Trench and Manila Bay.

Analyzed were the areas’ earthquake history, length of the fault and vulnerability to earthquake. Damage scenarios and estimates of costs of destruction were also done.


Impact

The seismic intensity generated by the West Valley Fault earthquake and the damage felt in an area varied from place to place. The intensity may range from 7 in Quezon City, almost 8 and 9 alongside Marikina River and Manila Bay, and 8 at west of Metropolitan Manila and 7 at other areas. Based on the Phivolcs Earthquake Intensity Scale (PEIS), intensity 7 is “destructive,” while 8 and 9 are “very destructive” and “devastating,” respectively.

Aside from the estimated death toll, the West Valley Fault earthquake would cause injuries to 118,200 persons, the study reveals. MMDC’s Macasieb said that the death toll would rise if the earthquake occurs during office hours where most of the people are working inside buildings including those who would come from the province to process various papers in the metropolis.

The number of buildings expected to be destroyed by the Manila Trench earthquake would reach about 5,000 while 16,000 for the Manila Bay fault. The West Valley Fault earthquake will cause the collapse of buildings in northeastern Quezon City, western Marikina, eastern Pasig, Muntinlupa-Laguna Bay and Mandaluyong-Makati. Evacuation would be difficult in the metropolis’ fringes particularly in the north, Taguig and Las Piñas, the MMEIRS study also found.

Residential buildings around the Malacañang in Manila and the House of Representatives in Quezon City would be severely damaged. Other infrastructures such as bridges and power posts will also be destroyed.

The danger of spreading fire to the Malacañang presidential office is not ruled. Liquefaction around the House area might take place. Even the MMDA building would be severely damaged, the study adds.

Collapses would lead to electricity short circuit, petroleum and LPG leakages from storage tanks, among others, that would cause fire. Areas highly vulnerable to fire would be Valenzuela, Caloocan, and south of Quezon City west intersection.

Damages to the Angat reservoir and water purification plant would likely happen, causing a long-term stoppage in water supply. Public transportation facilities such as airport runways would be closed, leaving only helicopters available for operations. Ports in the North and South harbors would be damaged and tilted by liquefaction, making these inaccessible for loading and unloading. Damages would likely be expected on roads and bridges.

Including victims of fires and liquefaction caused by the earthquake, the study estimates the number of refugees or evacuees at three million. The figure would include 1.3 million persons who would be uprooted from their homes if the aftershock would last about seven days.

After liquefaction, there would be a possible regional separation. The western part of Metro Manila would be isolated from other parts of the metropolis. The same thing would happen to the northern and southern parts due to building collapse especially in the area intersecting Makati and Mandaluyong. Meanwhile, all road networks running east-west that are on the fault would be broken.
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Old October 3rd, 2009, 11:25 PM   #743
3cr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caras2134 View Post
I heard that there is not much flooding within the global/fort bonifacio City except for some few areas, like the Burgos st. (anybody has confirmed flooding info , please post your info so we can share info). While the whole Metro manila is under water , including the Eastwood City, it is heartening to know (investment point of view) that Global City did survive this debacle. I believe that there will be flight from those exclusive village like Valle Verde,(in Pasig), San Lorenzo (Makati), to buy and live in a condo type of environment.
Property developers don’t see rush to buy condos
Business World
http://www.bworld.com.ph/BW100109/content.php?id=102

PROPERTY DEVELOPERS are not expecting a sudden spike in demand for condominium units in the aftermath of the devastation brought by storm Ondoy at the weekend.

There should also be no adverse effect on the industry overall despite the devastation of many residential areas in low-lying cities and towns, because of the huge housing demand that remains untapped.

But developers and the government should start looking at precautionary measures for property projects, industry players and analysts said.

"If there is anything that we learned from this tragic incident, it is the need for us to be more prepared for contingency [measures during these types of calamities]," Anthony Charlemagne C. Yu of Andrew L. Tan-led Empire East Holdings, Inc. said.

While Ondoy affected "horizontal" projects, Mr. Yu said there should be no significant shift in the market.

He was addressing observations that home buyers would now choose condominiums over houses and lots.

Ayala Land, Inc. president Antonio T. Aquino said the country’s top real estate firm expected condominium sales to be "normal and not be affected."

"Land values in the affected areas will be depressed for a short period, then recover afterwards," he added.

Jaime E. Ysmael, Ayala Land chief finance officer, said the company was fortunate it did not have projects in devastated areas.

But while the disaster would not create more demand for condominiums, it would nonetheless influence the buying decisions of consumers who are now expected to be more wary in selecting locations.

"Housing demand is still there and there is still a huge backlog that needs to be addressed," Mr. Ysmael said.

Mr. Yu also said: "Housing is a basic necessity and the challenge faced by the most productive segments of our population remains adequate housing in places within the metropolis."

But "land values in the Philippines, as developed areas are considered, will continue to be very stable regardless of the adversities," he said, pointing out that the value of land is dictated by demand and supply.

With a growing population especially in the metropolitan area, demand for affordable housing would not slacken in the next two decades, Mr. Yu said.

"Affordable housing is not a necessity dictated by economic conditions; it is necessity in any economic milieu," he said.

CB Richard Ellis Philippines, Inc. director Victor J. Asuncion, for his part, said affected areas would have difficulty attracting tenants. But because Filipinos have short-term memories, Mr. Asuncion said the aversion would be temporary.

"As soon as the government has the roads fixed, the public will have a different perspective. But this time, the government and the property developers should have precautionary measures [whenever a calamity strikes]," he said.

Mr. Asuncion believes the crisis will create a new demand for projects on higher locations.

"On top of the existing original demand, there will be an increase in demand for new houses coming from these affected areas," he said.

"The lesson everyone should learn is that developers should respect the nature and should not alter the natural topography of the land."

Last edited by 3cr; October 3rd, 2009 at 11:32 PM.
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Old October 4th, 2009, 04:11 AM   #744
C.deAndaluciaQ.C.
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Continues Build Up of High Rise buildings

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caras2134 View Post
The highest building being built right now is in Taipeh, China, 540 meters high roughly equivalent to 165 floors, the 2nd highest which is existing (used to be the highest before) is Petronas Building in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Approx 450 meters, roughly equivalent to 150 floors. There is a race now among our structural engineers who can build the highest building.
Going back to your question can those structures at BGC (average height of buildings at BGC around 50 floors or storey) withstand a 7 intensity quake. A 7 intensity quake is quite devastating, the Northridge Quake in Ca.,USA (1994) is just 6.7, (center is Reseda City where one of the major faultline , San Andreas is located ), aprrox 60 people died, the Golden Bridge collapse, Freeway 14 also collapse , and there are quite a numbers of buildings in California which gave way. In Indonesia , the recent earthquake this October 1 is about 7.6 but happened in one urbanized area, lots of building got flattened out and thousand died, Indonesia lies in one of the major faultline in the world.

We don't have any major faultline here in the Philippines, that is what I know, correct me if you can. But if we have an intensity 7 quake, you will be safer staying on those new condos, rather than staying on those old buildings in Avenida Rizal, Ayala Ave, Makati ave, Carriedo, Buendia. Believe me those old buildings will show more structural damage first than the new ones.
As to your question about the Fire fighting capability of our Fire Department. The truth is our fire fighting equipments are far behind compared to U.S.
It's amazing, that while there is continues global warning of the "Big One" , physicist and structural engineer keep on defying the odds. Build up of "skyscraper" as high as 100 storey continue unabated worldwide. And we are lucky in the Philippines that we have only minor fault lines to contend with compared to well known San Andreas and Calaveras Major Fault lines in California. But inspite of that look at the horizon of Los Angeles and San Francisco with all those tall buildings.
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Old October 4th, 2009, 05:04 AM   #745
Caras2134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3cr View Post
Property developers don’t see rush to buy condos
Business World
http://www.bworld.com.ph/BW100109/content.php?id=102

PROPERTY DEVELOPERS are not expecting a sudden spike in demand for condominium units in the aftermath of the devastation brought by storm Ondoy at the weekend.

There should also be no adverse effect on the industry overall despite the devastation of many residential areas in low-lying cities and towns, because of the huge housing demand that remains untapped.

But developers and the government should start looking at precautionary measures for property projects, industry players and analysts said.

"If there is anything that we learned from this tragic incident, it is the need for us to be more prepared for contingency [measures during these types of calamities]," Anthony Charlemagne C. Yu of Andrew L. Tan-led Empire East Holdings, Inc. said.

While Ondoy affected "horizontal" projects, Mr. Yu said there should be no significant shift in the market.

He was addressing observations that home buyers would now choose condominiums over houses and lots.

Ayala Land, Inc. president Antonio T. Aquino said the country’s top real estate firm expected condominium sales to be "normal and not be affected."

"Land values in the affected areas will be depressed for a short period, then recover afterwards," he added.

Jaime E. Ysmael, Ayala Land chief finance officer, said the company was fortunate it did not have projects in devastated areas.

But while the disaster would not create more demand for condominiums, it would nonetheless influence the buying decisions of consumers who are now expected to be more wary in selecting locations.

"Housing demand is still there and there is still a huge backlog that needs to be addressed," Mr. Ysmael said.

Mr. Yu also said: "Housing is a basic necessity and the challenge faced by the most productive segments of our population remains adequate housing in places within the metropolis."

But "land values in the Philippines, as developed areas are considered, will continue to be very stable regardless of the adversities," he said, pointing out that the value of land is dictated by demand and supply.

With a growing population especially in the metropolitan area, demand for affordable housing would not slacken in the next two decades, Mr. Yu said.

"Affordable housing is not a necessity dictated by economic conditions; it is necessity in any economic milieu," he said.

CB Richard Ellis Philippines, Inc. director Victor J. Asuncion, for his part, said affected areas would have difficulty attracting tenants. But because Filipinos have short-term memories, Mr. Asuncion said the aversion would be temporary.

"As soon as the government has the roads fixed, the public will have a different perspective. But this time, the government and the property developers should have precautionary measures [whenever a calamity strikes]," he said.

Mr. Asuncion believes the crisis will create a new demand for projects on higher locations.

"On top of the existing original demand, there will be an increase in demand for new houses coming from these affected areas," he said.

"The lesson everyone should learn is that developers should respect the nature and should not alter the natural topography of the land."
Condos are not for every Pilipinos, its for rich Pilipinos who has something to spare (20 -25% Pilipinos) . the average Pilipino will continue to buy the one and two storey houses , comes a year or two years from now they may even start buying again on those low lying areas of Marikina, Pasig, Pateros, Cainta if the price is right. They need to survive and by any means it is necessity of life.
But for people living in upper class subdivisions (rich), whose areas got flooded by "Ondoy" (out of fear that another heavy rains month from now a repeat of the same scenario ) will think twice and start buying condos as their alternate place of abode. It does not mean to say that they will stay on their condos all the time, only during bad weather.
Market for condos are those Pilipinos earning abroad; U.S , Canada, Australia. and this are the moneyed people. Most of them still go back to the Philippines for vacation, spend only 30% of their time in a year and with the recent flooding, condos will be on their line of sight.
Another markets for condos are those Koreans, Arabs, Japanese and etc. who marries Pilipina and stay for good. Or those foreigners who take Pilipina as their second wives and just commutes alternately between their country and PI. With the recent news of flooding in the Philippines, which are all over the world (CNN News) condos will be their preference.
And counting all the condos in Metro manila, I believe those condos located at Global city has the edge for it has proven that while the whole Metro manila is submerged in water, only a small area of Global did.
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Old October 5th, 2009, 09:59 PM   #746
3cr
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Storm damage has dampening effect on property market
By BERNIE CAHILES-MAGKILAT
October 2, 2009, 11:08am
Manila Bulletin

The damage to real estate caused by typhoon in Metro Manila and nearby areas has a dampening effect to some extent on investors in the property market in those affected areas.

This was the assessment made by Jaime Ysmael, senior vice-president and chief finance officer of Ayala Land Inc., on the impact of the flooding in those areas on the property market.Ysmael is also the president of the Asian Public Real Estate Association (APREA).

“It will dampen the interest of investors which is a natural reaction but we cannot be sure if it is a permanent thing because people forget,” Ysmael said.

On the part of ALI as a developer, Ysmael said that the geological location of the property that they are planning to develop is very important in their decision making.

“We are very conscious of location and geological location of our properties. We make sure that customers who buy properties from us are not subjected to that kind of disaster. We are quite deliberate in choosing location and with the disaster we have to monitor closely,” Ysmael said.

ALI, the property arm of the Ayala Corp., is the country’s biggest property developer and surprisingly it has not undertaken a development in those affected areas although it has few developments in the eastern part of Metro Manila but which have been spared from the wrath of typhoon Ondoy.


Ysmael further noted the local property market has been posting growth in the past four years. The growth has been sustained even with the impact of the global financial crisis.

“The trends are consistent although the third quarter is raining but the overall number is still good,” Ysmael said. “We’ve never been into recession and there no property bubble to speak of, prices are stable and in fact some are increasing,” Ysmael said. The underlying reason, he said, is there is an increased demand for mid-range housing there is liquidity for the high-end sector.

Last edited by 3cr; October 5th, 2009 at 10:31 PM.
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Old October 5th, 2009, 10:28 PM   #747
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'Gov't, private developers liable for flood damage'
ABS-CBN News
http://news.abs-cbn.com/nation/09/30...e-flood-damage


MANILA - Government agencies and private developers are jointly liable for the massive loss of life and property in several Metro Manila cities for practicing poor urban planning and allowing commercial and residential structures to be built in flood-prone areas, according to "green" architect and urban planner Felino Palafox Jr.

Palafox said a 1977 World Bank-funded study identified Marikina Valley, the western shores of Laguna de Bay, and the Manila Bay coastal area as among development areas that should prepare for flooding, earthquakes and possible changes in topography.

The Metro Manila Transport, Land Use and Development Planning Project (Metroplan), which was finalized by Hong Kong-based consulting firm Freeman Fox and Associates, has been used as a blueprint by urban planning developers and various government agencies and urban planners. Unfortunately, he said corruption and lack of planning has led to the shelving of some of the plan's recommendations.

"You see the irony here. National government agencies are aware that there is a flooding level of so many meters, then another national government agency would approve subdivision plans for only nine-meter high houses. There are about 32 signatures to obtain just to do a development project. It's like an obstacle course," he said in an ANC interview last Tuesday.


Proposed Parañaque spillway (in red) to flush out the excess water to the Laguna Bay and South China Sea

He said the Metroplan addressed flood-mapping in Metro Manila, specifically after the massive typhoon in 1970. He said the Metroplan included the construction of the Manggahan Floodway, which would divert floodwaters from reaching Metro Manila by diverting the water to the Laguna Lake.

"There was supposed to be a Parañaque spillway to flush out the excess water to the Laguna Bay and South China Sea, but this was never done. It was part of the recommendation," he said.

Palafox said the study recommended the monitoring of the Marikina Riverbank so that the water would not reach 90 meters. Likewise, no structure should have been allowed within 9 meters from the riverbank, he added.


The architect said he is currently working with Marikina Mayor Marides Fernando on several development projects in the city. He said that in Marikina, structures should be built above 17 meters which is above the maximum flood level of the city.

This is the reason why SM Marikina, which he helped design, was built on stilts, with the lower level of the mall used only for parking and all the shops on higher levels.

"In Marikina, instead of nine-meter high buildings you go upward and build a boulevard with dikes. All subdivisions should go medium-rise or high-rise and there should no longer be individual houses. It should be mixed use. You live upstairs, you work in the middle and you shop downstairs, just like Paris," he said.

Manila like Paris


1970's study already showed low-lying areas in Metro Manila are prone to flooding - Palafox

Palafox said that in 1905, American architect Daniel Burnham envisioned building Manila like the city of Paris. "He said it should be designed like Paris beside the River Seine, like Manila beside Pasig River. He said the esteros of Manila could be like the canals of Venice. We were alright until the 1940s when the Americans left and then we adopted wrong models of urban planning," he said.

As an architect, he said he often tells potential clients that they should practice due diligence and look at the 100-year flood history of a potential development area before starting construction. He lamented, however, that some short-sighted clients would only look at the 25-year flood history of an area since the planned structures are not built to last.

"We are always reacting to crisis. It bothered me when I saw these reports and pictures and people are saying it's an act of God. It's not. It's us not following the plans and proposals. If you are an urban planner, an environmental planner, these have been planned as early as 1905," he said.

He said that to address the problem of flooding, the government should consider "vertical urbanism" and build more high-rises instead of "horizontal urbanism."


He criticized the lack of coordination among government agencies and cited the EDSA corridor as a prime example of how urban planning has failed in the Philippines.

"I did a study in Harvard on the EDSA corridor on how not to do a city. You have high-transit stations surrounded by low-gated communities and low-density military camps. How do you make people walk to it?" he said.

He said that to address the problem of climate change and future flooding in the Philippines, urban planners should start redesigning cities in the country by looking at the lessons of the past and seeing what other countries are doing.


"In a crisis like this, it's an opportunity to be creative and learn. Technology can address these problems," he said.



Kaso nga lang McKinley Hill is under the flight path just like the other southern developments in the Fort Bonifacio Campus such as the future BOSO/SOBO (Jusmag) area (see below) which would restrict the height of buildings in the area. They can't be too tall of a building so McKinley Hills may end up being more of an IT park campus/residential type area more so than a full fledge CBD like BGC. Anyway lapit lang rin naman ito sa BGC and Makati.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kratos1211 View Post

Last edited by 3cr; October 5th, 2009 at 11:24 PM.
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Old October 5th, 2009, 10:59 PM   #748
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Urban-devt programs’ review up
Business Mirror
Written by Estrella Torres & Butch Fernandez / Reporters
http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/hom...review-up.html

MALACAÑANG has ordered a comprehensive review of urban planning and development programs that will integrate disaster-risk reduction measures amid threats of more flash floods and fierce typhoons as part of the impact of climate change.

Presidential Deputy Spokesman Anthony Golez admitted on Monday that local governments were remiss in the urban planning and development programs that led to massive flooding in Metro Manila and Rizal when storm Ondoy dumped record rainfall on September 26.

At the same time, Sen. Francis Escudero prodded government authorities to revisit earthquake-preparedness plans for Metro Manila, particularly in areas traversed by the West Valley fault, also known as the Marikina fault line.

“Even as we try to cope with the devastation caused by Ondoy, let us not make the fatal mistake of forgetting that dire warnings have been made regarding a possible big quake in Metro Manila,” Escudero said.

The senator aired the warning after at least 1,100 people were killed by two successive earthquakes in Sumatra, Indonesia, on Wednesday and Thursday last week.

He cited a 2002 study funded by the Japanese government which, he said, showed that “if a 7 to 9 magnitude quake triggered by the West Valley fault line hits Metro Manila today, it could be unlike any tragedy seen or imagined in Metro Manila.”

According to Escudero, the Metropolitan Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study includes 100 actions plans that would mitigate the impact on areas expected to suffer most from the projected quake.

“We need not reinvent the wheel. Let us see what our resources are and find out how we can address the concerns raised in the study. Our people have suffered more than enough from ad-hoc governance,” the senator added.

He said a worst-case scenario in the study says that up to 35,000 Metro Manila residents would likely be killed and over 3 million others displaced by a big quake. It also projects that tens of thousands of homes and buildings would collapse from the temblor.

The West Valley fault line is one of three cutting across Metro Manila. The two others are the Manila Bay and Manila Trench fault lines.

The last big earthquake that hit Metro Manila and the rest of central and northern Luzon in July 1990 killed 1,700 people. Reports also said the intensity 7.7 quake hurt 3,000 persons and displaced 148,000 people. Property and infrastructure damage was placed at $2 billion.

‘Failures there for years’

Meanwhile, Golez said failures in effective urban planning were already there for many years. He emphasized the need for remedial measures on urban planning.

“[But] the [problems in] urban planning...[were] not invented by the present or the sitting mayor or the sitting local officials. It has been there from the very start. So it’s hard to put the blame on anybody as of the moment,” said Golez in a press briefing on Monday.

“One very important ingredient in coming out with an urban-planning and development [plan] would be putting into consideration disaster risk-reduction measures,” he said, adding that local policies and ordinances must now integrate specific measures on disaster-risk reduction.

Golez, meanwhile, said the government would also strengthen measures to ensure sustainable environment, particularly on the approved mining and logging projects to prevent extensive catastrophes due to typhoons.

He said any decisions of the national and local governments in scrapping mining and logging operations should be based on the state’s policy to implement safe mining practices.

Golez said President Arroyo has ordered government agencies, particularly the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority, to facilitate massive cleanup and rehabilitation works of Metro Manila, Rizal and the Northern Luzon provinces devasted by Typhoon Pepeng.

Meanwhile, the Nacionalista Party (NP), led by its standard-bearer Sen. Manny Villar, raised the need to seriously establish a comprehensive climate-change adaptation program that will prepare the country for the catastrophic impact of typhoons, flash floods and drought.

The NP conducted rescue operations last weekend after Typhoon Ondoy submerged Metro Manila and Rizal that killed close to 300 and affected 600,000.

NP spokesman and former Cavite representative Gilbert Remulla said while the government and concerned citizens have been widely engaged in relief operations to alleviate the miseries of displaced families in evacuation sites, a more strategic and comprehensive response must be put in place.

NP officials and youth volunteers are now focused on providing relief assistance to victims of Ondoy, particularly in the hard-to-reach areas in Cainta, Pasig and Marikina and Rizal province and other affected areas. The NP is likewise poised to provide assistance in the Northern Luzon provinces hit by Super Typhon Pepeng.

Remulla said the extent of devastation of typhoon Ondoy should teach us lessons to urgently establish climate change-mitigation and adaptation programs to ensure that there would be no more casualties and lesser damages to crops and properties.

He added that the Philippines experiences an average of 10-12 typhoons every year and belongs to the countries that sit on the Pacific Ring of fire where frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.

The NP official cited the latest findings of the United Nations Environment Programme (Unep) that the pace and scale of climate change are now outstripping science predictions as the impact are coming sooner and faster.

The preliminary findings from the new World Bank study on the Economics of Climate Change, meanwhile, estimates that the costs of adaptation to climate change by developing countries will reach $100 billion a year for the period 2010 to 2050.

Philippine experts said the government would need an estimated P3 billion to P7 billion annual budget to implement climate change-adaptation programs to ensure sufficient agriculture products supply for the rest of the population.

Last edited by 3cr; October 6th, 2009 at 12:17 AM.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 12:17 AM   #749
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The Fort boom continues and it definitely looks like it's really just a matter of time now...

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Originally Posted by chesterot View Post
Bonifacio Global City expects to equal Makati space by 2012
http://www.bworldonline.com/BW092109/content.php?id=046


THE BONIFACIO Global City expects to become as big as Makati in terms of floor area in three years, the developer of the former military reservation in Taguig said, pointing to the mushrooming of condominiums, corporate headquarters, and retail businesses.

This would be a huge change from what used to be viewed as just an alternate route to the Makati central business district (CBD).

In a statement, the Fort Bonifacio Development Corp. (FBDC) said it expects Bonifacio Global City’s gross floor area to hit 2.6 million square meters (sq. m.) by 2012 or more than twice the figure today. Citing various studies, FBDC said it expects the supply of residential units to reach 8,442 units — at par with Makati’s and surpassing Ortigas’ 7,000 units.

Property analysts have projected Bonifacio Global City to come out of depressed prices first. Rates in Fort Bonifacio fell by a fifth to P550 per sq. m. in the second quarter.

This was slower compared to the 42% drop in the price of prime offices in the Makati district to P700 per sq. m. from April to June. Property experts expect land prices at Fort Bonifacio to go up in the future as it dethrones Ortigas Center in Pasig as an alternative CBD three to five years from now.


"The vision is to create an ideal and balanced lifestyle with sufficient time for work and recreation. By creating an environment that fosters such a balance, we hope to attract locators who will contribute further to this goal," Noel Kintanar, FBDC head of commercial operations, said.

FBDC is a joint venture between Ayala Land, Inc. and Campos-led Evergreen Holdings, Inc., as well as the government’s Bases Conversion and Development Authority. Ayala Land and Evergreen bought the controlling stake in the property firm from Metro Pacific Investments Corp. in 2003.

With the opening of the Bonifacio High Street commercial center, FBDC said the development is spreading northward through the "City Center North" area, which has 14 commercial lots that are around 2,000 sq.m. each.

Aside from City Center North, other developments include a science museum — The Mind Museum — which is expected to draw 250,000 visitors annually upon completion in 2011.

"This will be in addition to plans to expand and upgrade the transport system and other systems, infrastructure, and amenities that will ensure a city that works," FBDC said.

Fort Bonifacio dates back to the American colonial period, when the US government acquired land in Taguig for military purposes. After Philippine independence, the area, known then as Fort William McKinley, was renamed Fort Bonifacio and became the home of the Philippine Army and later, the Philippine Marines.

When Fort Bonifacio land was privatized in 1995 and placed under the administration of the Bases Conversion and Development Authority, the whole area was restored to Taguig.

High-end residential condominiums include Essensa, Serendra, Pacific Plaza and Regent Parkway, Forbeswood Heights, and Kensington. Office buildings include Net Square, Bonifacio Technology Center, the HSBC Building, Hanjin Philippines, and the Singapore Chancery.

More projects are set to rise on the area, which include the six-star, 60-storey Shangri-La at the Fort which would have 500 hotel rooms and 234 apartments. It is scheduled to open in 2012.

The Philippine Stock Exchange is planning to build a unified headquarters at Fort Bonifacio, leaving its offices in Makati and Ortigas.

The 14-storey St. Luke’s Medical Center, which will have 600 beds and an 11-storey medical arts building with 366 doctors’ offices, will open this year.

Fort Bonifacio will also become the site of the country’s tallest building, the 66-storey skyscraper Federal Land Tower costing P20 billion. — Kristine Jane R. Liu
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Old October 6th, 2009, 01:20 AM   #750
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Mmm... I wonder how badly Megaworld wants to win this auction for the right to develop the Jusmag lot which would definitely complement their McKinley Hills development? Considering how loaded Megaworld is right now, this will definitely be a great opportunity for further development across McKinley Hills if they succeed...

Jusmag lot auction readied
by Elaine Ramos Alanguilan

State-owned Bases Conversion and Development Authority will be putting up the 35-hectare Jusmag property in Fort Bonifacio in the auction block this year.

Aileen Zosa, vice president for business development of BCDA, said the Jusmag property has been initially valued at P20,000 per square meter.

“We want to masterplan the whole area into Bonifacio South to maximize land values and big developers can give us good price. The Jusmag property is initially valued at P20,000 per sq. m. on a raw land basis but the minimum bid offer could be higher with the master plan,” said Zosa.

The 35-hectare property is located near the high-rise condominium Essensa, the posh Forbes Park and right across the headquarters of the Philippine Army.

Zosa said developable land in the proposed Bonifacio South is about 93 hectares, with the Jusmag property accounting for nearly half of the entire area.

She said the auction for the Jusmag property is the first phase of Bonifacio South. Part of the master plan is to widen Lawton Avenue, the main road artery in Fort Bonifacio.

She said the proposed Bonifacio South would be mixed-use development and include cultural, convention center and arts centers, institutional and government offices, “which are usually forgotten in the quest for profits in real estate development."

Last edited by 3cr; October 6th, 2009 at 01:25 AM.
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Old October 16th, 2009, 04:32 PM   #751
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‘Hot money’ flows back to Philippines a year after Lehman Brothers collapse

Friday, 16 October 2009 00:00

By Maricel E. Burgonio, Senior Reporter

FOREIGN investors returned to the country’s financial markets a year after the Lehman Brothers debacle, with the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) reporting net inflows of foreign portfolio investment (FPI) in the first nine months of this year. In a statement, the BSP said FPI registered a net inflow of $46.95 million last month, a turnaround from the net outflow of $82.91 million in August and hemorrhage of $443.12 million in September last year.

Also called “hot money,” FPI represents foreign placements in the country’s stocks, bonds and other peso-denominated financial assets.

Last month’s net inflow caused the nine-month tally to hit $229.13 million, or an improvement over the net outflow of $889.15 million in the first three quarters last year.

Foreign investors fled emerging markets like the Philippines, following the bankruptcy filing of the US investment bank in September last year.

“Amid the global economic slowdown, investor sentiment in the Philippines remained relatively upbeat owing to the better than expected economic performance during the first half of 2009 supported by robust remittances, easing inflation and interest rates, and sound macroeconomic policies,” BSP Governor Amando Tetangco Jr. said.

The BSP said about 82 percent of end-September FPI were in Philippine Stock Exchange (PSE) listed shares while the balance went into government securities and peso time deposits.

In September alone, net outflows were recorded during the first three weeks due to lack of positive leads but the trend shifted toward the end of last month when foreign investors became net buyers, buoyed by the special block sale of shares in a local property firm, which the BSP refused to name.

Gross investment inflows hit $4.7 billion in the first three quarters of this year.

The top five-investor countries include the US, the United Kingdom, Japan, Singapore and Luxembourg, which collectively contributed 81 percent of total funds received.

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Old October 17th, 2009, 02:40 AM   #752
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I heard that there is not much flooding within the global/fort bonifacio City except for some few areas, like the Burgos st. (anybody has confirmed flooding info , please post your info so we can share info). While the whole Metro manila is under water , including the Eastwood City, it is heartening to know (investment point of view) that Global City did survive this debacle. I believe that there will be flight from those exclusive village like Valle Verde,(in Pasig), San Lorenzo (Makati), to buy and live in a condo type of environment.

I was told by my relative that there was no flooding in Eastwood. Do you have any link to a video/picture that indicate otherwise? Seen Pasig river but thats about it.
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Old October 18th, 2009, 06:12 AM   #753
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I was told by my relative that there was no flooding in Eastwood. Do you have any link to a video/picture that indicate otherwise? Seen Pasig river but thats about it.
Try this one, got this link from a fellow poster named "Pusa21":
Originally Posted by pusa21
saw this video as well. he kept on saying "oh my gosh" in the first half of the video and filipino and english profanities on the second half of the video when he actually saw the flood on the basement of his condo and inside eastwood itself. (i probably would have said the same thing.) the elevator was busted so he had to climbed down 16 flight of stairs!

found a copy of the video but it seems audio is not working:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRxG00o-mys

i hope they're all okay now. ondoy is really nasty.
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Old October 18th, 2009, 06:29 AM   #754
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[QUOTE=Berting;44733372]I was told by my relative that there was no flooding in Eastwood. Do you have any link to a video/picture that indicate otherwise? Seen Pasig river but thats about it.[/QUOTE

Typhoon Ondoy's brought super extra amount of rainfall that flooded most of luzon, almost all street of metro manila got water during that time. what matters is the ability of the place to drain out the water immediately which Eastwood does. Meaning, that the drainage system is working out well , a plus factor. But what worry me is a glimpse on that video: Marikina river overflowing off the concrete bank. Eastwood City being just next to the edge of the river
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Old October 19th, 2009, 09:53 AM   #755
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ALI is developing a property along Mercedes Ave., Pasig -- the Ametta Place. Wasn't the whole stretch of Mercedes Ave. submerged in flood for a week?
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Old October 19th, 2009, 03:46 PM   #756
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grabe ang baha sa mercedes ave. affected ang street na ito.
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Old October 19th, 2009, 04:34 PM   #757
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Quote:
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I was told by my relative that there was no flooding in Eastwood. Do you have any link to a video/picture that indicate otherwise? Seen Pasig river but thats about it.
There was a portion at the back of Olympic Heights Condominium in Eastwood City where the river overflowed as the water destroyed the barrier (as seen in the video). The management responded swiftly by fixing the barrier and with huge water pumps sucked the water out quickly. The damage was the basement parking of Olympic Heights due to its proximity to the river and as it took awhile to pump the water out of the basement. The other condos including ours, I havent heard or seen any problems flood wise.

For a few days the residents parked along Orchard road and it was fine as its a secure area until the water was sucked out of the basement dry. Otherwise, we live just a few blocks away from Olympic Heights, Eastwood was fine. Jessa Zarragosa already had her concert by the pond/fountain of Eastwood Mall which is just opposite Olympic Heights by the following saturday.

Im not familiar wth the set up of Olympic Heights but I suppose they have multiple elevators that are cleared as operational as soon as its checked for safety.
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Old October 19th, 2009, 09:13 PM   #758
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ALI is developing a property along Mercedes Ave., Pasig -- the Ametta Place. Wasn't the whole stretch of Mercedes Ave. submerged in flood for a week?

To give you an idea, Marikina City and San Mateo were probably better located and elevated than that area in Pasig. If you look at the maps, Mercedez st and the whole periphery are bounded by Marikina River to the east, Manggahan Channel to the north and Pasig River to the south. I will have an sleepless night if Iam living on that area and knowing that another typhoon is coming.

Last edited by Caras2134; October 20th, 2009 at 04:59 AM.
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Old October 20th, 2009, 08:15 AM   #759
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Lets get back to the thread guys. This is the Mckinley Hill thread.
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Old October 20th, 2009, 11:29 AM   #760
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correct..
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