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Old July 9th, 2013, 06:15 AM   #881
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Shenzhen Airport T3 (or Terminal C) Updates




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Shenzhen T3 by BlakeXu, on Flickr

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Shenzhen Airport by BlakeXu, on Flickr


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Old July 9th, 2013, 09:13 AM   #882
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Expert: Maglev a better choice for tourism line
2013-July-9 08:53
Shenzhen Daily

MAGNETIC levitation technology is a better choice than standard rail for the city’s future Metro Line 8, a tourism line that will connect downtown Luohu District with Xiaomeisha in Yantian District, a Shenzhen Metro Co. senior engineer said.

Jian Lian has researched magnetic levitation, or maglev, trains for Shenzhen Metro for seven years. As planning discussions for the future Metro line accelerate, Jian recently said maglev technologies can significantly reduce vibrations, noise pollution, friction and risks of wheel malfunctions.

“Maglev trains are more environmentally friendly, quieter, quicker and cheaper than wheel-rail trains,” Jian said.

Wheel-rail trains can travel up to 80 kilometers per hour, while low- to medium-speed maglev trains can reach 100 kilometers per hour. The trip between Luohu and Meisha could be reduced to 45 minutes, Jian said.

Using maglev technology for the 26-kilometer Metro Line 8 could save costs, as well, because it would be built above current roads. A wheel-rail train would be built underground.

Shenzhen Metro Co. has conducted maglev feasibility studies since 2006. Jian said experts from the Chinese Academy of Engineering have concluded that maglev is better than traditional Metro trains and low- and medium-speed maglev trains would be appropriate for Metro Line 8.

Jian said the radiation emissions that commuters fear would be low, at a level that doesn’t harm humans. Studies and field tests have shown that the radiation from maglev trains is equivalent to that from wheel-rail trains. In addition, Jian said, materials used in maglev trains can block radiation emissions.

Shenzhen planning authorities have completed two separate plans for construction of Metro Line 8, one based on wheel-rail trains and one based on maglev trains.

Maglev train projects have drawn protests and been delayed or suspended in Beijing, Shanghai and Hangzhou over the past five years because of radiation concerns, primarily from residents who live near proposed lines.

Shenzhen’s Metro Line 8, whether on wheels or magnets, will go through the Liantang, Shatoujiao, Yantian’ao and Meisha areas.

If the wheel-rail plan is adopted, the western terminus would be at Guomao Station, which is an interchange station with the Luobao, Shekou and Huanzhong lines, and with the future Metro Line 9.

If the maglev plan is adopted, the western terminus would be at Wenjin, an interchange station with the Shekou and Huanzhong lines and with the future Line 9.

The two plans will be submitted to upper-level authorities for a final decision. The project’s start date is unknown.
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Old July 9th, 2013, 10:18 AM   #883
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I hope the maglev technology has a future in our world
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Old July 10th, 2013, 06:31 AM   #884
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Quote:
SHENZHEN will start preparations for the construction of its second convention and exhibition center within the year.
The new exhibition center will be twice the size of the existing center in Futian District, which covers 100,000 square meters. Shenzhenís economic, trade and information commission said itís started the site selection process.
Source: http://szdaily.sznews.com/html/2013-...nt_2545784.htm

I read once that they consider to transform the current airport terminals A and B into a new exhibition center. Guess the only possible sites for this project are in Bao'an or Longgang.
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Old July 10th, 2013, 07:09 AM   #885
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Eh, Maglev was blocked within China too, just like everywhere else - it doesn't have wear and tear so there is no (very) juicy spare parts business like in regular rail. Why do you think the Ministry of railways officials now on death row blocked Maglev in China for so long, even supposedly paying "protesters" money to stage noise, as they know once it takes off, it's a death knell for the old stuff? Not to mention their French, Jap and German 'technology suppliers' doing all they can to lobby Chinese railway officials to block Maglev? It's not the price - actually Maglev is 20% cheaper per km than HSR for 60% higher speed, I was in the feasibility study teams doing it.

Talking about that, a 7 min gate-to-gate Maglev link was on the table for HKIA-SZIA airport link, across Tuen Mun and Shekou... as for the SZIA, DoubleU is right, the existing terminals A/B/D could be turned into convention centre. Alternatively, land around Hourui metro station one stop before the airport..
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Old July 10th, 2013, 08:58 AM   #886
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Don't think maglev is cheaper to build than conventional HSR. When they assessed feasibility for a maglev line between Beijing and Shanghai, the cost estimate came out astronomical, so the conventional technology won the day.

Is it a different story for low-speed maglev as opposed to HSR?
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Old July 10th, 2013, 04:26 PM   #887
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Actually, the 'winning' conventional HSR bid for Beijing Shanghai segment was heavily underquoted, as it is often done, while the Maglev side, led by engineers instead of marketeers, quoted a 'safe' price with plenty of buffers within. At the end, HSR won but the final cost that added up was waaaay higher than what was bid.

If we did Maglev on that segment, the ride would have been 3 hours including stops (instead of 5 hours with HSR), which would of course kill off the air travel there totally. Why you think the airlines are kind of tolerant of HSR but absolutely hate Maglev?

I can tell you that, for instance in the current Singapore-KualaLumpur technology battle on this, the Maglev cost was around US$ 33M per km while HSR cost was US$ 40M per km, but the 'bidders' still underquoted the HSR one plus of course the 'marketing incentives' from the technology provider corporations. Maglev doesn't have such a krafty backer, as simple as that...

Low speed maglev would be compared against metro trains, not HSR, and yes it should be about 20% cheaper for the same configuration otherwise...
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Old July 10th, 2013, 05:33 PM   #888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NNshenzhen View Post
Actually, the 'winning' conventional HSR bid for Beijing Shanghai segment was heavily underquoted, as it is often done, while the Maglev side, led by engineers instead of marketeers, quoted a 'safe' price with plenty of buffers within. At the end, HSR won but the final cost that added up was waaaay higher than what was bid.

If we did Maglev on that segment, the ride would have been 3 hours including stops (instead of 5 hours with HSR), which would of course kill off the air travel there totally. Why you think the airlines are kind of tolerant of HSR but absolutely hate Maglev?

I can tell you that, for instance in the current Singapore-KualaLumpur technology battle on this, the Maglev cost was around US$ 33M per km while HSR cost was US$ 40M per km, but the 'bidders' still underquoted the HSR one plus of course the 'marketing incentives' from the technology provider corporations. Maglev doesn't have such a krafty backer, as simple as that...

Low speed maglev would be compared against metro trains, not HSR, and yes it should be about 20% cheaper for the same configuration otherwise...
So was conventional HSR more expensive than maglev in the end for Beijing-Shanghai? There has been a huge construction and inflationary boom in China over the past decade. I doubt the maglev estimate would have been accurate had that technology been adopted since the builders would have faced the same inflationary pressures.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 10:30 AM   #889
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I think American interests objecting to the selling/sharing of maglev technologies in China is another obstacle.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 10:50 AM   #890
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Not really. The major players of maglev technology are the Germans and the Japanese. The Germans were very happy to demonstrate the technology in Shanghai.
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Old July 12th, 2013, 08:00 PM   #891
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Yes, in fact we're looking at a maglev bid right now to link HKIA and SZIA for the proposed gate to gate high speed link between two airports. The Germans and Chinese pretty much act as a single team, in fact big part of Shanghai Maglev team, incl Tongji Univ people, speaks fluent German.

Our problem is convincing mostly Anglo-oriented HK authorities, incl MTR, to adapt anything that their former colonial masters are against, especially since Brit's own Maglev many years ago was killed by, yes, rail unions refusing to support something without good spare part business.

Second, no, I can testify, Maglev bids were not underpriced like HSR bids. Simply, the engineers put in charge of Maglev didn't know how to play marketing cheat tricks that the old rail gang knew well, like cutting off the interest costs, land costs, darn even train carriage costs from base cost and then 'adding' them later..

Not to mention, if we had HK Kowloon to Guangzhou central station maglev, it would be just 20 minutes train with CURRENT Shanghai Maglev trains... not to mention the new ones.
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Old July 17th, 2013, 07:28 PM   #892
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New terminal work moving forward
2013-July-15 08:53
Shenzhen Daily

A birdís-eye view of Terminal C at Shenzhen International Airport. Terminal C is scheduled to soon replace the airportís existing Terminal A and Terminal B and is designed to handle 45 million passengers per year by 2020. Airport officials said Terminal B might continue airport operations in the future to cope with growing air traffic volume, while Terminal A might be converted into a shopping complex.
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Old July 26th, 2013, 06:58 PM   #893
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Realities of urban development
26 July 2013
China Daily Excerpt

Huge floating population poses tough transformation challenges for policymakers in Shenzhen

Urbanization, with all its advantages, has also created challenges for policymakers, and prominent among them is the resettlement of people from areas that are earmarked for redevelopment.

Looking at He Ling and two other villagers from Sichuan province playing cards in the shade of several multi-story buildings in West Gangxia village in the central business district of Shenzhen, one of the largest urban resettlements in China, it is easy to assume that hardly any such problems exist.

Looking up from his card game, with his hands on the makeshift table, the 36-year-old says that he and his companions have been living in the village ever since they came to Shenzhen a decade ago.

Though the landscape of Shenzhen has altered considerably since then, He says that he is luckier than many others as his village has not seen much change. "I can keep living and making money from the same place by doing the same small business of buying secondhand refrigerators, air-conditioners and other household appliances, and then selling them to factories and companies," he says.

Not all are so lucky. Just 1,000 meters away, East Gangxia Village has been razed to the ground. By 2017, a new urban complex with several skyscrapers will replace the seven and eight-story dwellings that made up the village.

He is just one of the 13 million people who have moved from the countryside or other cities in China to Shenzhen, a city adjacent to Hong Kong. Today, several urban villages, which have been home to the floating population, are facing renovation or reconstruction challenges due to an acute scarcity of land.

Apart from the two Gangxia villages, there are about 240 urban villages across Shenzhen. Most of them have are being redeveloped, or retrofitted.

Urban complexes, which use the city space efficiently, are blossoming on many of these village sites that were originally home to farmers and other migrants.

Though the new urban complexes still sport the look and feel of a community, they are much more commercial, comprehensive and consistent with a modern city. Needless to say, the cost of such a face-change is also enormous.

Shenzhen has long been regarded as a pioneer of China's urbanization. In 1979 it had roughly 30,000 people when the late leader Deng Xiaoping made it a Special Economic Zone. Today it is a thriving metropolis of over 12 million whose population has risen by 56 percent in the last decade.

The population density in Shenzhen has risen to 17,150 people per square kilometer, making it fifth in the list of global megacities ahead of even Shanghai and Beijing. From a small fishing village, Shenzhen has become a city with 22 urban areas, and a further seven are likely to be added before 2015, says information provided by WorldUnion, a Shenzhen-based real estate consultant.

Among the city's eight districts, Futian, the hub of living in Shenzhen, and Nanshan, which encompasses the southwest area of Shenzhen, are the two development hot spots with mushrooming urban complexes where office buildings, shopping malls, residences and related public facilities are coming up.

"In Futian district, more than 70 buildings are generating more than 1 billion yuan in tax revenue every year. Most of them are multi-functional buildings where high-rise floors are used for offices and apartments, while lower-level areas are for commercial purposes," says Xie Huihui, director of Futian District Urban Redevelopment Authority.

That in itself is a major transformation from the old village economic model of landlords, mostly local people, charging rent. Without unified planning, most of the earlier buildings were built according to the whims and fancies of the landlords, and in many cases gave an impression of being dirty and unsafe.

"Some of these buildings are in the core of Shenzhen, and look extremely old and shabby. Due to economic development, more space is in need for industrial upgrades. Therefore, we have no choice but to create more space through modification and reconstruction," Xie says.

According to Xie, policymakers in Shenzhen have decided to develop eight areas in Futian district, each one with a featured industry. "Municipal supporting systems like transportation, medical facilities, education and community services, are also being planned in the new city complexes," he says.

Gemdale Dabaihui Corporation, a Chinese real estate development company, is currently undertaking the process of demolition and reconstruction of East Gangxia Village.

"We signed the contract with the local government in 2006. However, it took us seven years to resettle 100,000 people from the village, which occupies 220,000 square meters of flat area," says Hu Weiming, general manager of Gemdale Dabaihui Corporation (Shenzhen).

From Hu's office, a high-rise building near the village, can be seen the yellow earth and the demolition work that has already been done.

"On the land, we will build two office buildings, six high-end apartments, an art center, one exhibition hall, and a business area of over 300,000 square meters," Hu says.

The project, which is estimated to be finished in 2017 with an investment of 16 billion yuan, will be the final piece of the Shenzhen central business district.

"Prior to the renovation, land banks in the city were often scattered. But with the new urban complexes, there is a rational, ordered and optimal use of the land," Hu says.

The original village will continue to be an integral part of the new city, he says. "What we are trying to do is to ensure that the villagers earn more money through the newly developed properties.

"We compensate villagers in the proportion of one to one in accordance with the size. With more than 600,000 square meters area earmarked for residents, we are confident that nearly two thirds will be returned to villagers," Hu says.

Meanwhile the floating population that used to live in the village has moved on to other nearby village-in-cities. Once the complex is finished, some of them will come back.

Unlike the massive reconstruction in East Gangxia, real estate developer Costal Group had little problems in setting up a huge facility at its property in Nanshan district, originally a fishing village in the southwest of Shenzhen.

"When we came here in 1999, it was a pool farming oysters, fishes and shrimps. We decided to join the land filling project of the government," says Zhu Liwei, director of Costal Group.

Zhu says he bid for four pieces of land from the government, two for office buildings and two for commercial complexes.

"We have sold the office buildings and are currently playing the role of a property manager. The property adjacent to the total 120,000-square meter commercial center belongs to us," Zhu says.

According to Zhu, there was hardly any commercial area, except for some small shops along old streets, in the district. After the establishment of the Shenzhen Bay Cross-Sea Bridge (Hong Kong-Shenzhen Western Corridor) in 2007, which shortened the driving distance between Shenzhen and Hong Kong, Zhu says the potential for commercial business started gaining ground in Nanshan district.

However, his business was not so smooth in the beginning, he admits.

"We never had enough workers. Most of our customers were local people and they preferred only low-end products." In 2007, there were just 1 million people living in Nanshan district, Zhu adds.

With the district being developed now and new companies moving in, there has been an increase in the number of white-collar workers using the shopping mall, especially during daytime.

"We are planning to upgrade the level of brands. A Hong Kong restaurant, which sold a set meal priced at 40 yuan, has now become a high-end restaurant providing a dedicated menu," Zhu says.

"Although business at the shopping mall is somewhat affected by the easy access to Hong Kong, it still fills a commercial gap in the district."

Zhu says that his company is now considering similar projects in Wuxi and Jiangyin in Jiangsu province.

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Old July 31st, 2013, 08:10 PM   #894
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Property spike in Qianhai spurs `false boom' warning
The Standard
Monday, July 29, 2013

Investors should be aware of soaring home prices in districts near Shenzhen's Qianhai special economic zone, which may be creating "a false boom" that is spurred on by developers and speculators, Shenzhen Commercial Daily warned in an article yesterday.

New flats now cost a minimum of 30,000 yuan (HK$37,953) per square meter in communities near Qianhai, the daily said.

Going by Soufun data, it would mean prices are 8.9percent above those quoted in Shenzhen last month. Soufun is the largest real-estate information website in the mainland.

It is thought that out of the 650,000 to 750,000 people who would find work in Qianhai, only 150,000 to 220,000 could be accommodated in the zone.

In other words, more than two thirds of the staff will have to find homes in adjacent districts in Shenzhen. And this has sparked speculation.

"It is too early to be bullish on properties in or near Qianhai as the special region is still a concept on paper," warned independent property analyst Yi Xiangwu.

Meanwhile, Shenzhen-based Excellence Real Estate Group won the first two Qianhai sites with tenders of 5.19 billion yuan for T201-0077 and 7.18 billion yuan for T201-0075. This was a premium of 142 percent and 152 percent, respectively, above base prices.

The latter site has now become the most expensive in Shenzhen.

Construction costs for the two plots are estimated at around 40,000 yuan per sq m.
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Old August 7th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #895
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My new Shenzhen Supertalls Video, based on z0rg's and Scion's List this time.
Supertalls Total: 66
Built: 3
Under Construction: 9
Site Preperation: 7
Approved: 2
Proposed: 45

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7Jww2xtlMU

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Old August 8th, 2013, 02:41 AM   #896
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oooohhhhhh yeeeessss.....
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Old August 8th, 2013, 03:02 AM   #897
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SZ-Zhongshan link plan unveiled


A computerized image of Shenzhen-Zhongshan Corridor.SD-Agencies

Source: http://szdaily.sznews.com/html/2012-...nt_2266835.htm
people...
in your opinion, which is better?
shenzhen-zhongshan bridge or zhuhai-macau-hong kong bridge?
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Old August 8th, 2013, 01:50 PM   #898
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You need both, and even once they are both in operation, the existing Humen-Zhonshan North link will still be well patronised, I'm sure - it addresses the Dongguan - Nansha - Foshan corridor south of GZ, while SZ-Zhongshan bridge will connect to the highways going to southern Guangdong coast and then Hainan... and HK-Macau-Zhuhai bridge has its own gambling crowd to take care of, I guess.

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people...
in your opinion, which is better?
shenzhen-zhongshan bridge or zhuhai-macau-hong kong bridge?
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Old August 8th, 2013, 01:51 PM   #899
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Actually, what needs to be done is that long proposed widening of the old Guangshen expressway to 10 lanes from the current 6... else, once the coastal 8 lane highway opens next month, who'd want to get stuck on the old one?
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Old August 12th, 2013, 03:11 PM   #900
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Baguang power plant canceled
9 August 2013
Shenzhen Daily

THE city government has dropped a plan to build a new coal-fired power plant in Baguang, eastern Shenzhen, the Shenzhen Municipal Development and Reform Commission said Wednesday, after lawmakers called for the scrapping of the controversial plans.

Authorities have asked Shenzhen Energy Group to stop preparatory work for the construction of the power plant. Furthermore, the city will not put forward any new plans to build coal power plants in the future, according to decisions made at an executive meeting of the municipal government Aug. 1.

Shenzhen Energy Group said Thursday it would follow the decision of the government and respect the publicís will. It said it would choose a suitable site outside of Shenzhen for the construction of the new plant.

Jin Xinyi, a member of the local political advisory body, thought the cancellation of the plant was a victory for the public, and that it showed good communication between the government and citizens.

Jin said large projects such as power plants should be openly discussed and that the interests of the public must be taken into consideration over those of select small groups.

He said the government should announce major projects earlier, instead of just days or months before construction work begins, otherwise its credibility will suffer.

Since the National Energy Administration gave its go-ahead for the coal power plant project to begin preliminary work in January, the plan has received strong public opposition over air pollution concerns. In June, 43 Shenzhen lawmakers headed by Zheng Xueding called for the cancellation of the project and objected to any new plans to build coal power plants anywhere in Shenzhen.

On July 12, 39 more deputies sent two requests to the human settlements and environment commission, and the development and reform commission. The human settlements and environment commission said late July that Shenzhen is not a suitable location for coal power plants, saying the proposed plant could cause damage to Dapeng Peninsulaís ecological environment.

In 2006, Shenzhen Energy Group proposed to build a coal power plant with two 1-million-kilowatt generators in Baguang while shutting down some other small, polluting coal power plants, saying the move would greatly cut emissions because the new plant would use new technology.

In another development, Mayor Xu Qin said Wednesday that the plan for the construction of Baguang Fine Chemical Industrial Park, proposed in 2005, has been scrapped to avoid competition with the petrochemical base in neighboring Huizhou City. An industrial park for newly emerging industries, which the government says will be environmentally friendly, will be built in Baguang.
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