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Old June 21st, 2006, 04:44 PM   #81
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Hoping this is the correct thread:

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June 21, 2006
By Thomas A. Corfman

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GE and MB Real Estate buy Columbus Hospital site
(Crain's) - Ending months of negotiations, a joint venture of General Electric Corp.’s pension fund and Chicago-based MB Real Estate Services LLC has acquired the shuttered Columbus Hospital site overlooking Lincoln Park.

The deal apparently salvages Chicago developer Nicholas Gouletas’ plans for a luxury condominium development, although Mr. Gouletas will have a limited role in the development.

“We’ve got the jet fuel to get this thing going now,” says John T. Murphy, executive vice president with MB Real Estate.

The deal initially values the prime 3-acre parcel, at 2520 N. Lakeview Ave. at $45 million, but the value could rise to as much as $60 million, depending on condo sales in the 325-unit, high-rise project, according to sources familiar with terms of the transaction, which closed on Monday.

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The initial purchase price is roughly equal to the total amount of Mr. Gouletas’ loans on the site, including a $19 million first mortgage from LaSalle Bank.

Peter E. Ricker, MB’s chairman and chief executive, says the GE pension fund is a 50/50 partner with RMI LLC, a new company he has formed with Mr. Murphy. The joint venture has hired residential consultant Charles P. Reiss, a former top executive with New York developer Donald Trump, as a consultant on the Columbus project. Mr. Reiss supervised the pre-development stage of Trump International Hotel and Tower Chicago, now arising alongside the Chicago River.

“We certainly have a better pedigree than anything that’s been there,” Mr. Ricker says.

Mr. Gouletas, chairman of Chicago-based American Invsco Corp., and an investment group bought the site in 2001 for a reported $34 million. Despite its location, the project was been plagued by problems, including a 2003 lawsuit filed by Mr. Gouletas’s sister, Evangeline Gouletas, over a buyout of her interest in American Invsco. The case has since been settled.

Although he relinquishes control, Mr. Gouletas stays on to handle marketing. He could not be reached for comment. One of the original investors in the project, a group advised by Southfield, Mi.-based law firm Seyburn, Kahn, Ginn, Bess & Serlin, retains a stake in RMI, Mr. Ricker says.
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Old June 21st, 2006, 09:12 PM   #82
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Development Group to Acquire

Columbus Hospital Site Overlooking Lincoln Park

A partnership involving a number of prominent names in real estate investment

and development has purchased the Columbus Hospital property at 2520 N. Lakeview Ave., a prime 3-acre parcel fronting Lincoln Park that has already received city approval for a luxury high-rise condominium development.



The partnership is led by RMI, a venture of Peter E. Ricker, chairman and CEO, and John T. Murphy, executive vice president, of MB Real Estate, a Chicago-based firm with extensive experience in commercial and residential real estate. Ricker and Murphy have assembled a team that includes an affiliate of the GE Pension Trust, advised by GE Asset Management, as well as Charles P. Reiss, former executive vice president and managing director of the Trump Organization.



The GE Pension Trust affiliate along with RMI will provide the equity, while Reiss,

who oversaw all pre-development activities for Trump International Hotel and Tower Chicago, will serve as a consultant to the developers.



The seller is 2520 Lakeview LLC, an affiliate of Chicago-based American Invsco, which has been retained to perform the sales aspect of the project.



The site has zoning and entitlements for a 325-unit luxury high-rise condominium development and is clearly one of the premier residential development sites in the country,” said Ricker. “Given the location, the view perspective and the framework of the development plan, this is truly a unique opportunity to create something very special.”



Murphy added that the partnership is reviewing all aspects of the project, and will unveil its development plan at a future date. “Other than the guidelines set forth by the city, our approach is that we’re starting with a clean slate,” said Murphy.

While plans are still being finalized, Murphy said preparations for demolition of the hospital buildings, which were shuttered in 2001, will begin almost immediately. The actual demolition will get underway later this summer, and a pre-sale registration program for buyers will commence at that time as well.

Although Ricker and Murphy are better known locally for their work in office development and leasing, both partners also have significant experience in luxury residential development.

Ricker has partnered with the Trump Organization on two luxury projects in Manhattan: the $400 million Trump Park Avenue condominium tower and the highly successful Trump International Hotel and Tower. Murphy has residential development interests in Ohio and Florida.

Meanwhile, Charles Reiss has overseen a number of high-end condominium and hotel projects during an 11-year career with the Trump Organization. Reiss left Trump in August 2004 and presently has a consulting practice focusing on luxury residential and hospitality properties.

“In the years since I’ve come to Chicago, this site has always been of interest to me. It’s an A-list site that has been coveted by a lot of developers. So when Peter and John approached me with this opportunity, I knew this deal could finally happen, and I knew I wanted to be a part of it,” Reiss said.

“Among RMI, GE Asset Management and Charlie Reiss, we’ve got a lot of experience, vision and stability. We’re committed to doing something great for the city, for the neighborhood and especially for the families and individuals who will be buying homes here,” Ricker said.
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Old June 21st, 2006, 09:31 PM   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky444
Two new items going on in Lincoln Park.

A new six story building just announced for Deming Place, across from the Columbus Hospital site. OK, so not a skyscraper exactly - but something going on nonetheless. By a hubby/wife team calling themselves Silverleaf Development LLC. Anyone got any more details?
Another condo project coming to Lincoln Park
By Jeanette Almada
Special to the Tribune
Published June 18, 2006

A six-story condo building with 35 units is planned for West Deming Place and North Lakeview Avenue in Lincoln Park.

Chicago-based Silverleaf Development LLC will build the project through a group called 416 W. Deming Place LLC. Silverleaf is a new development company owned by Chicagoans Scott Borstein and Lauren Tatar, a husband-and-wife team whose first mixed-use project, Walcott Terrace on the North Side, was finished last fall.
...
California-based Behnisch Architects is designing the project.

-------

Looking at the firm's work, it should be interesting and hopefully modern.
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Old June 22nd, 2006, 05:42 PM   #84
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Luxury condos checking in at old hospital site

June 22, 2006

BY DAVID ROEDER Business Reporter





A local investment team with capital and know-how from the East Coast confirmed on Wednesday it has taken over a prime Lincoln Park development site, promising to deliver the most luxurious buildings in Chicago.

A partnership involving Peter Ricker and John Murphy, executives of MB Real Estate, has purchased the former Columbus Hospital property at 2520 N. Lakeview. With views of Lincoln Park and Lake Michigan that cannot be blocked, the 3-acre site is seen as a natural for high-rise housing at prices matching those of exclusive downtown towers.

Ricker and Murphy formed an independent firm called RMI for the venture. Property records indicate it paid $45 million for the site, taking out the interest of American Invsco Corp. Invsco, run by condo conversion king Nicholas Gouletas, will remain as the marketing agent.

Plans are to follow a zoning plan city officials have approved, Ricker said. The plan allows for three towers totaling 325 units, with the tallest building about 38 stories.
While there will be tweaks in the design, none will require a zoning review, he said. That cuts the likelihood of a protracted fight with an affluent neighborhood that knows how to pressure developers.

"The plan that's in place is suitable for the market today, and the product we'll deliver with be the highest quality ever delivered in Chicago," Ricker said.

The boast is worthy of Donald Trump, and there's a connection. Signing as a consultant for the project is Charles Reiss, who as a former managing director of the Trump Organization was involved in planning the 92-story building under construction at Wabash and the Chicago River. It will be called the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

Ricker has partnered with Trump in New York projects. Trump has no involvement in the Columbus Hospital site, Ricker said.

RMI is providing equity with a pension trust affiliated with General Electric Co., based in Fairfield, Conn. The Sun-Times reported the pending deal in April.

Ricker is chairman of MB Real Estate and Murphy is an executive vice president. Both said that while MB will have a role in the project, RMI is a separate operation.

MB is owned by the brothers Edward and Howard Milstein, big investors in multifamily housing in New York.

Invsco has controlled the site since 2001, but couldn't muster the financial backing to start construction. Numerous liens were filed against the Gouletas-led venture, but those have been paid, and Murphy said RMI has a clean title.

He said demolition of the hospital, which closed in 2001, will start later this summer, and construction could begin in about a year. Prices haven't been detailed, but Murphy said the overall budget could hit $400 million. With 325 sales to make that up, the owners will need multimillion-dollar units to earn a return.

Ald. Vi Daley (43rd) has been apprised of the new ownership and supports the project's continuation, Murphy said. Daley could not be reached.

Eugene Fisher, executive director of the Diversey Harbor Lakeview Association, said the neighbors will monitor the development closely. Their oversight "succeeded in downscaling the original Columbus proposal to a more responsible size, and they can be expected to continue working equally hard to make certain the new Columbus initiative is done right," he said.

The Gouletas plan employed a design by Lucien Lagrange, one of Chicago's best-known architects. Ricker said his group is "pretty far down the line" in talks with Lagrange to retain his services.

The revised plan will be shown to the neighborhood later this summer, Ricker said, around the time a registration program for buyers will begin. He said Gouletas signed contracts for about 30 percent of the units, and while those prospects had deposits refunded, some are likely to renew their interest.

http://www.suntimes.com/output/busin...in-hosp22.html
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Old June 23rd, 2006, 05:38 PM   #85
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Luxury condos checking in at old hospital site

June 22, 2006

BY DAVID ROEDER Business Reporter

A local investment team with capital and know-how from the East Coast confirmed on Wednesday it has taken over a prime Lincoln Park development site, promising to deliver the most luxurious buildings in Chicago.

A partnership involving Peter Ricker and John Murphy, executives of MB Real Estate, has purchased the former Columbus Hospital property at 2520 N. Lakeview. With views of Lincoln Park and Lake Michigan that cannot be blocked, the 3-acre site is seen as a natural for high-rise housing at prices matching those of exclusive downtown towers.

Ricker and Murphy formed an independent firm called RMI for the venture. Property records indicate it paid $45 million for the site, taking out the interest of American Invsco Corp. Invsco, run by condo conversion king Nicholas Gouletas, will remain as the marketing agent.

Plans are to follow a zoning plan city officials have approved, Ricker said. The plan allows for three towers totaling 325 units, with the tallest building about 38 stories.

While there will be tweaks in the design, none will require a zoning review, he said. That cuts the likelihood of a protracted fight with an affluent neighborhood that knows how to pressure developers.

"The plan that's in place is suitable for the market today, and the product we'll deliver with be the highest quality ever delivered in Chicago," Ricker said.

The boast is worthy of Donald Trump, and there's a connection. Signing as a consultant for the project is Charles Reiss, who as a former managing director of the Trump Organization was involved in planning the 92-story building under construction at Wabash and the Chicago River. It will be called the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

Ricker has partnered with Trump in New York projects. Trump has no involvement in the Columbus Hospital site, Ricker said.

RMI is providing equity with a pension trust affiliated with General Electric Co., based in Fairfield, Conn. The Sun-Times reported the pending deal in April.

Ricker is chairman of MB Real Estate and Murphy is an executive vice president. Both said that while MB will have a role in the project, RMI is a separate operation.

MB is owned by the brothers Edward and Howard Milstein, big investors in multifamily housing in New York.

Invsco has controlled the site since 2001, but couldn't muster the financial backing to start construction. Numerous liens were filed against the Gouletas-led venture, but those have been paid, and Murphy said RMI has a clean title.

He said demolition of the hospital, which closed in 2001, will start later this summer, and construction could begin in about a year. Prices haven't been detailed, but Murphy said the overall budget could hit $400 million. With 325 sales to make that up, the owners will need multimillion-dollar units to earn a return.

Ald. Vi Daley (43rd) has been apprised of the new ownership and supports the project's continuation, Murphy said. Daley could not be reached.

Eugene Fisher, executive director of the Diversey Harbor Lakeview Association, said the neighbors will monitor the development closely. Their oversight "succeeded in downscaling the original Columbus proposal to a more responsible size, and they can be expected to continue working equally hard to make certain the new Columbus initiative is done right," he said.

The Gouletas plan employed a design by Lucien Lagrange, one of Chicago's best-known architects. Ricker said his group is "pretty far down the line" in talks with Lagrange to retain his services.

The revised plan will be shown to the neighborhood later this summer, Ricker said, around the time a registration program for buyers will begin. He said Gouletas signed contracts for about 30 percent of the units, and while those prospects had deposits refunded, some are likely to renew their interest.
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Old June 26th, 2006, 08:19 AM   #86
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He said demolition of the hospital, which closed in 2001, will start later this summer, and construction could begin in about a year.
Great news. I noticed they took down the old Lakeview sign that was outside the hospital, which was serving as a makeshift sales center. I've lived very close to the hospital for a few years now, and I must have walked past that goddamn sign a million times, wondering what the hell was going on with this project. I'm so happy to see this is moving forward and that demo could begin later this summer. Honestly, the old Columbus Hospital has to be one of the most sinister, brutal, inward buildings I've encountered. When I walk past this building, whether it be on Deming or Lakeview, I don't feel welcomed by it. Good riddance.


Quote:
[T]here will be tweaks in the design ... "The plan that's in place is suitable for the market today, and the product we'll deliver with be the highest quality ever delivered in Chicago," Ricker said.
I'm confused about this. I don't see how they plan on "deliver[ing] the highest quality ever delivered in Chicago" by only making mere "tweaks in the design." In order to deliver such quality, the project needs a complete redesign. The old design had that bland, olde-tyme character to it. I hope they come up with something very special, as this is a special site.
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Old June 26th, 2006, 07:32 PM   #87
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http://www.globest.com/news/606_606/.../146857-1.html

Quote:
Murphy says the there have been no selections made on the project architect or general contractor. “Other than the guidelines set forth by the city, we're starting with a clean slate,” he tells GlobeSt.com.
I guess we'll have to wait and see
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Old June 28th, 2006, 07:02 PM   #88
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Old July 4th, 2006, 02:52 AM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky444
A new six story building just announced for Deming Place, across from the Columbus Hospital site. OK, so not a skyscraper exactly - but something going on nonetheless. By a hubby/wife team calling themselves Silverleaf Development LLC. Anyone got any more details?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy
Another condo project coming to Lincoln Park
By Jeanette Almada
Special to the Tribune
Published June 18, 2006

A six-story condo building with 35 units is planned for West Deming Place and North Lakeview Avenue in Lincoln Park.

Chicago-based Silverleaf Development LLC will build the project through a group called 416 W. Deming Place LLC. Silverleaf is a new development company owned by Chicagoans Scott Borstein and Lauren Tatar, a husband-and-wife team whose first mixed-use project, Walcott Terrace on the North Side, was finished last fall.
...
California-based Behnisch Architects is designing the project.
The name of this project is called "Deming On the Green." Here is a photo of the rendering I took today.



Apparently, this development is replacing the old "Deming Place" project. It's located on the same site and the sign for Deming Place is gone. I'm pretty disappointed. Here is a rendering of Deming Place.

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Old July 4th, 2006, 03:01 AM   #90
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are you jokeing?! that infill was the first of its kind that i finnaly thought was nice! now there filling it in with this peice of shit?
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Old July 4th, 2006, 03:20 AM   #91
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Are you guys kidding me? Can you really be serious? I'm more than happy that this multi-unit apartment building will be replacing three oversized, goudy, not-fit-for-this-time row homes. I'm so sick of these uber-rich multi-million dollar homes. Okay, so maybe those three homes were sort of "classy" looking. But we have to remember: all of us participate on this forum because we love cities. Low density projects like those three apartment buildings wouldn't contribute to actual urban life in lincoln park. Sure they may appear to be urban but let's face reality: they are low-density mansions with three-car garages that would have housed maybe even one person in each home. Those three homes would have most likely produced 0 public transit riders. Additionally,those three homes would provide only three local household clients for the neighborhood grocery stores and retailers. Sorry, but all those stores and retailers in Lincoln park are better off with high density development.

So thank god that those row homes are being replaced by a high-density development. It's about time something like that happen in lincoln park. This develpment will provide more "affordable housing" - i mean it as a relative term - in the neighborhood for growing upper-middle class families that want to be near the park but can't afford a 6 million dollar elitist home. And believe me, that's a serious problem Lincoln park. And most of all, the neighborhood grocers, retailers, public transit lines will all have more clients and users. The architecture on this building isn't even that bad. Sometimes you guys make me sick. Cities aren't always about pleasing the eyes. Lincoln park shouldn't be an urban theme-park projecting the illusion of urbanity but really housing the density of suburbs. No, Lincoln park deserves true diverse urbanity - the kind that maybe doesn't always look "charming" in a picture - and that's what this development provides for the neighborhood.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 03:36 AM   #92
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^ Great point, ThirdCoast, and I totally agree with you on this
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Old July 4th, 2006, 03:37 AM   #93
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^Dude, will you relax? I don't appreciate someone telling me I "make them sick" because I prefer one development over another. This is a ******* condo project for christ's sake. You act like the fate of the universe is at stake.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 04:09 AM   #94
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I am with wickedestcity and hydrogen. Some of you think that a box is "modern" and that people who don't like bland boxes are stuck in the past.

Nothing could be further from the truth. It is the box that is old. Boxes have been around since the 1940's.

What wickedestcity and hydrogen seem to be saying, put in its simplest terms, is that the previous project looked good. That is one simple test. Does it look good? That concept alone trumps the "starker is better" philosophy and the flawed "box = modern" philosophy.

The new Deming Place design, in my opinion, simply does not look as good as the one that is dead. I don't care what era you think it's from.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 04:17 AM   #95
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Originally Posted by NearNorthGuy
I am with wickedestcity and hydrogen. Some of you think that a box is "modern" and that people who don't like bland boxes are stuck in the past.

Nothing could be further from the truth. It is the box that is old. Boxes have been around since the 1940's.

What wickedestcity and hydrogen seem to be saying, put in its simplest terms, is that the previous project looked good. That is one simple test. Does it look good? That concept alone trumps the "starker is better" philosophy and the flawed "box = modern" philosophy.

The new Deming Place design, in my opinion, simply does not look as good as the one that is dead. I don't care what era you think it's from.
^ ????

Did you even read ThirdCoast's post? Show me where he even talked about modernism being the reason why he supported the new building. His entire criticism has to do with density, and how numerous apartments filling an equal parcel of land as 3 big houses is a better use of space, and will create a better urban environment full of people who will walk and use transit and create business for the commercial corridors.

His argument makes total sense and I agree with him in principle
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Old July 4th, 2006, 09:40 AM   #96
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Yeah - nothing in his post suggested derision of the architectural style of the original Deming Place. He simply was hating on the format of the project. I am inclined to agree with him.

Except, though, that multi-unit buildings in urban environments are almost always modern, whereas traditional architecture tends to take the form of the row/townhouse. Granted, we get a few postmoderns in the near north (Park, Elysian), but by and large, we're dealing with modern designs (not always boxes, tho).
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Old July 4th, 2006, 10:06 PM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
^ ????

Did you even read ThirdCoast's post? Show me where he even talked about modernism being the reason why he supported the new building. His entire criticism has to do with density, and how numerous apartments filling an equal parcel of land as 3 big houses is a better use of space, and will create a better urban environment full of people who will walk and use transit and create business for the commercial corridors.

His argument makes total sense and I agree with him in principle
I understand his point completely. The "urbanity" promoted in his post, which primarily consists of the goal of bringing more density, is being done at the expense of the quality of the building. Density in Lincoln Park, when done in place of nice looking buildings, is not good. We should try to do both.
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Old July 4th, 2006, 10:28 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NearNorthGuy
I understand his point completely. The "urbanity" promoted in his post, which primarily consists of the goal of bringing more density, is being done at the expense of the quality of the building. Density in Lincoln Park, when done in place of nice looking buildings, is not good. We should try to do both.

I agree. Density is not always good for densities sake. There has to be a balance (not to say the new proposal looks bad and might turn out to be above average).

There are many high density projects that are crap that we have all seen that a bit less density would be preferred over sub-par quality architecture.

Also a few tightly packed "elitist homes" are not the end of the world. You don't think ultra-urban cities like NYC, San Fran, or London also don't have stand alone tightly packed uber-rich homes? It is not the end of the world if some well designed homes are placed instead of multi-storied multi-unit condos. Packing in as many people in an already dense Lincoln Park also shouldn't be as much a concern as attracting people to fill up scarring empty lots in less demands areas is.

What is always needed is more and better architecture (not to say that the orginal Deming Place plan was going to be the end all be all but it had the potential to looks pretty darn nice).
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Old July 5th, 2006, 03:01 AM   #99
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First off, lincoln park really isn't that dense. Trust me, the stores lining clark street struggle because their client base is declining as more lincoln park residents turn to their cars for shopping.This is no isolated example of low-density mansion architecture.This is a widespread problem in lincoln park. Tons of 2 and 3 flats are being demolished and replaced by massive single family mansions - not to say that these mansions always house families. These families that move in drive giant suv's and clog the neighborhood streets as they drive to wholefoods, best-buy, and webster place, even though they might be only 4 or 6 blocks away. This is no urban lifestyle. These new homes and these new families are turning lincoln park into traffic-clogged suburban hell-hole. And those three homes would have contributed to the problem. People from suburban backgrounds pay big bucks to look at beautiful row homes so that their life and environment can appear urban. But at they same time they refuse to live the lifestyle old brownstones and the new-construciton bulidings that immitate them were designed for: street life. Lincoln park shouldn't be a themepark. Because these new construction mansions are a joke.

Sure these new mansions may look "urban" - and i don't think they do - but we can't fall for superficial looks. The look of cities will always evolve. There is no certain architecture that makes a city a city. However, what will always legitimize a city is its density. I'm repeating myself, but again, we should happy that we are gaining more. The architecture of this new building really isn't that bad. Besides, it's not like those three row homes had any revolutionary design that would have changed the course of humanity. We shouldn't be saddened by the loss of something so, IMO, fake. If alll of you are so sad, you guys ought to just suck lucien lagrange's dick. I've got his number and i'd be happy to hook all of you up with him, if that's what it takes.
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Old July 5th, 2006, 04:01 AM   #100
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Well this building contains 35 parking units, so it will contribute even more to turning Lincoln Park into a "traffic-clogged suburban hell-hole" than the three houses.

And I don't think anyone appreciates your last couple sentences - this is a skyscraper website, there's no reason why we can't be civil.
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