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Old September 23rd, 2006, 04:10 PM   #121
eelton
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Quote:
www.lincolnpark2520.com

By Lucien Lagrange...no design yet.
You can see the building on the architect's website. (Go to projects--> residential--> 2520 N Lakeview.)

It looks the same as it did in its previous life, when it was proposed as The Lakeview.

Last edited by eelton; September 23rd, 2006 at 04:16 PM.
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Old September 23rd, 2006, 08:01 PM   #122
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^Yes that could be it.

But in the hundreds of news articles, the developers kept talking about starting over with a "clean slate." I was hoping that they might have the guts to actually do something modern.

I guess we'll find out more next year.
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Old October 28th, 2006, 12:04 AM   #123
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Community Meeting Re: Columbus Hospital Site

Looks like there was a meeting yesterday, and I missed it (damn!) Here are the details:

Alderman Vi Daley, the Park West Community Association and the Diversey Harbor Lakeview Association invite you to attend a meeting on Thursday, October 26 regarding demolition and construction plans and discussion of the timelines for the old Columbus Hospital site. Meeting will take place at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 2000 North Cannon Drive, 2nd Floor. For addl information - 773-327-9111.
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Old October 28th, 2006, 02:09 AM   #124
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...i-business-hed

Columbus Hospital to make way for condos

By Susan Diesenhouse

Tribune staff reporter
Published October 27, 2006

By late November demolition will start on the long-shuttered Columbus Hospital to clear the 3.4-acre site at 2520 N. Lakeview Ave. for construction of what one industry expert says is the first major multifamily project to go up in Lincoln Park since the 1970s.

In about three years, at a cost of approximately $350 million, the affluent North Side neighborhood will have Lincoln Park 2520: a new triple-tower condominium high-rise designed by Lucien Lagrange Architects with perhaps 312 units and 13 townhouses, Chicago-based developer RMI LLC said Thursday.

Traditional masonry design, luxury features and ample services will be "reminiscent of the finest 1920s and 1930s buildings in Lincoln Park," Peter E. Ricker, an RMI principal, said of the homes priced from about $550,000 to perhaps $10 million. "It's a special site because the views of North Pond, Diversey Harbor and the lake can't ever be blocked."

The project, which will have towers rising 22, 31 and 38 stories, is a planned development approved by the city and community, and it has been a long time coming.

It daunted one developer, American Invsco Corp., which last spring sold the site for $45 million to RMI and its financial partner, an affiliate of General Electric Pension Trust. The development team will invest equity of $100 million in the project, Ricker said.

The luxury complex overlooking the park and Lake Michigan will feature a one-acre back yard and a concierge, among other amenities. It could bring needed new housing to the area and eliminate a longtime neighborhood eyesore that has been vacant since 2002, said Ald. Vi Daley (43rd).

"It's a beautiful building that will be a good addition to the neighborhood," Daley said.

Although some nearby residents might prefer not to have development, she said, the new project will "be better than having a vacant hospital there."

A community meeting has been planned for Thursday night to inform neighbors of what to expect during the six-month demolition and 27-month construction process.

Few big new projects have been built in Lincoln Park because appropriate sites are a rare find, Daley noted.

Indeed, the site's location should buoy unit sales despite the housing market slowdown, said Gail Lissner, a vice president at Appraisal Research Counselors, an appraisal and consulting firm.

"The upper end of the condo market is tough, but we think this project will differentiate itself by the location and spectacular views," said Lissner, who has been an adviser to RMI on the project.

She said the last major high-rise built in Lincoln Park, one with more than 100 units, was completed about 30 years ago at 2500 N. Lakeview Ave.

To move ahead, the development does not require any further city or neighborhood approvals other than a demolition and building permit, RMI executives said.

The latest iteration of the project has many of the same features outlined in previous plans.

The size of the project, the setback from the street and the amount of parking will not vary. The plan calls for parking for about 625 cars at 2520 N. Lakeview Ave. between West St. James Place and West Deming Place

But there have been some changes, said John T. Murphy, the other RMI principal.

The structure will feature a canopied entrance with a circular driveway on West Deming Place. The main entrance on Lakeview Avenue has been altered from three small lobbies to one grand entry that will be 80 feet long and 22 feet high. Residents' shared amenities will include a spa, pool, library and media room.

The one-bedroom to four-bedroom units will start at about 800 square feet and are planned to go as high as 11,500 square feet.

Some condominiums might be larger because potential buyers have inquired about combining units to form a larger home.

Units will have open floor plans, approximately 10-foot-high ceilings, balconies and bay windows.

Some walls included in earlier designs have been eliminated to accommodate floor-to-ceiling windows. More balconies have been added to the building, and some existing ones have been enlarged.

Each unit will be equipped with technology for remote adjustment of appliances, such as temperature, window shades, music and videos.

American Invsco, while no longer a development partner, will market the units. Sales are expected to start in February with the completion of a model unit.

The developers' market research predicts that about 35 percent of future buyers will come from North Shore suburbs, 40 percent from Lincoln Park and the rest from downtown Chicago.

Murphy declined to give a specific number of prospective buyers who have already started inquiring about the project, but he said, "Already we have a significant premarketing waiting list."
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Old October 28th, 2006, 03:30 AM   #125
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^
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Old October 28th, 2006, 07:02 AM   #126
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Is it me, or is that the exact same design of the earlier project? A mansard roof?? From Lucien LaGrange??? Never would've expected that....
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Old October 29th, 2006, 06:24 AM   #127
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My god, the thing looks EXACTLY like Elysian...

I'm not just joking here, I honestly can't tell what has changed between this and Elysian, other than the width of the building. The tallest massing is quite literally indistinguishable from Elysian.

If this is the best we can do with traditional styles, I want modern here. C'mon.. even LA is getting really really good "traditional" new buildings.
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Old October 30th, 2006, 12:05 AM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
My god, the thing looks EXACTLY like Elysian...

I'm not just joking here, I honestly can't tell what has changed between this and Elysian, other than the width of the building. The tallest massing is quite literally indistinguishable from Elysian.

If this is the best we can do with traditional styles, I want modern here. C'mon.. even LA is getting really really good "traditional" new buildings.

Its beyond me how the same firm that puts out beautiful modern designs such as Park Kingsbury and Erie on the Park can then turn around and design structures like Elysian and Ten East Deleware...
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Old November 17th, 2006, 11:08 PM   #129
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An interesting retail project going in at Halsted and Blackhawk.



More information here.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 01:02 AM   #130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
If this is the best we can do with traditional styles, I want modern here. C'mon.. even LA is getting really really good "traditional" new buildings.
Yeah, that's what it comes down to. If you're gonna do traditional, do it right. If you can't do it right, then go with modern. Faux-traditional crap is pretty depressing on an anotherwise stellar architecture scene.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 05:45 AM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creil View Post
An interesting retail project going in at Halsted and Blackhawk.



More information here.
^ I think the right side is the British school, but the building on the left looks like something different.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 08:32 AM   #132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creil View Post
An interesting retail project going in at Halsted and Blackhawk.



More information here.
Horrible architecture...
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Old November 18th, 2006, 09:24 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ I think the right side is the British school, but the building on the left looks like something different.
Actually, the left side (south) is the British School.

Better pictures can be seen at strdev.com/
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Old November 18th, 2006, 12:59 PM   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creil View Post
An interesting retail project going in at Halsted and Blackhawk.



More information here.
this is total shiza! (sp??) can you say crap in any language.....puke, yuck , nasty, ......
.......it looks like a wavy-gravy old school Ho-Jo
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Old November 18th, 2006, 08:05 PM   #135
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Eh? I'm confused

When it's Pomo you guys hate it. When it's glassy and modern, you hate it as well. Pardon me for saying this, but this is getting pretty damn ridiculous, no? Maybe if nobody builds squat everyone will be happy.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 08:10 PM   #136
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Okay, I just checked out STRDEV's website as creil suggested, and WTF? Are some of you people still on the pipe? This is exactly the kind of architecture the city's neighborhoods need, instead of the usual brick cookie-cutter yawners we've been getting for a decade. This to me sets the standard for future large stand-alone retail developments in Chicago's neighborhoods.

By the way, does anybody know what these structures will be replacing? If we're losing some gorgeous turn-of-the-century buildings for this, it may sap the appreciation I'm having for this development right now.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 08:29 PM   #137
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Yeah, this is way better than most of the crap that we typically get. Go look at the architects website for some other views. This will surely be a great development for the area.
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Old November 18th, 2006, 10:26 PM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
Okay, I just checked out STRDEV's website as creil suggested, and WTF? Are some of you people still on the pipe? This is exactly the kind of architecture the city's neighborhoods need, instead of the usual brick cookie-cutter yawners we've been getting for a decade. This to me sets the standard for future large stand-alone retail developments in Chicago's neighborhoods.

By the way, does anybody know what these structures will be replacing? If we're losing some gorgeous turn-of-the-century buildings for this, it may sap the appreciation I'm having for this development right now.
Looking at Google Earth (if you go by the site today it's already razed and ready to build), it looks like we're not losing anything special. Just some ugly block buildings.

I see both points of view here. If this were going in an more residential/commercial area, it may not fit in. However, this is going in an old industrial area that has seen some unusual architecture as of late (Weed Street). I think this is a good centerpiece for this area and if you do look at the pictures on the other website I posted, you'll get a better perspective.

Last edited by creil; November 19th, 2006 at 02:28 AM.
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Old November 19th, 2006, 03:32 AM   #139
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Originally Posted by i_am_hydrogen View Post
Horrible architecture...
Agreed. It looks like '60's "schlok" architecture.
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Old November 19th, 2006, 03:57 AM   #140
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I guess you can't change everyone's mind, but the building is definitely way better than the forgetful brick design we would otherwise get on this site.


^Cool exterior balcony/walkway

^Looks like there's a gym at the top
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