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Old February 25th, 2012, 01:56 AM   #221
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Old February 25th, 2012, 02:01 AM   #222
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Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Downtown Vancouver's density highest in Canada
The Province
February 9, 2012

The population of the city of Vancouver as a whole grew more slowly than the provincial average of seven per cent between 2006 and 2011.

However, the growth downtown was higher than average, at 11 per cent.

The latest census data shows Vancouver grew by 4.4 per cent during those five years, to 603,500, giving Vancouver a population density of 5,490 per square kilometre, the highest in Canada.

That density spikes to 9,104 in the central part of the city defined by the federal electoral riding of Vancouver Centre, which includes all of downtown to Main Street and south to Broadway.

The growth downtown was thanks to the construction of condo towers and the city's concerted efforts to increase density.

"It goes to show that if you build it, they will come," said demographer Ryan Berlin of the Urban Futures Institute.

The downtown lifestyle, where everything is accessible by foot or transit, is attractive to young professionals, which is important as cities compete for younger workers as the population ages, Berlin said.

Mayor Gregor Robertson announced a housing affordability task force this week to see if government policy is needed to increase the stock of affordable housing.

Urban planner Michael Geller said the answer to providing more affordable housing is increasing the supply of housing stock, as evidenced by census numbers showing Surrey grew by almost 20 per cent while remaining a relatively inexpensive place to buy a home.

"Some people say we're not building housing because it's too expensive, but I would suggest [housing] is too expensive because we're not building more housing in Vancouver," Geller said.

"We are building lots of housing in Surrey, which is contributing to its growth and which is also resulting in a fair degree of affordable housing as well."
This is what I love about this city. It has planned it's downtown area extremely well. I love it's density and the fact that you can see people walking all over the place.
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Old February 25th, 2012, 04:17 AM   #223
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That headline is a little misleading. The Old City of Toronto (before amalgamating with Etobicoke, North York, York, and East York) had a population of 730,656 in 2011 on 97.15 sq km giving it a density of 7,521 people/sq km.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Toronto
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Old February 26th, 2012, 03:36 PM   #224
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It's not misleading....city limits are city limits.
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Old February 26th, 2012, 11:01 PM   #225
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updated first page
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Old February 27th, 2012, 02:16 AM   #226
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Can you please post new proposals on here too so we will know which ones you updated? Not everyone know which ones you updated.
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updated first page
Hed_Kandi,

Just making sure you read this.
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Old February 28th, 2012, 06:33 PM   #227
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Non-profit housing project will target 'hidden homeless'
Third of new units on Fraser St. for youth aged 16-24

By John Colebourn, The Province
February 26, 2012

Dick Vollet can't wait for construction to begin on a new non-profit housing project in East Vancouver that is specifically designed to help the homeless.

As president of the Streetohome Foundation, Vollet is thrilled by Thursday's donation of $375,000 from Coast Capital Savings, which means the non-profit housing project has funding to break ground.

Construction will start by early summer on the development at 2465 Fraser St., Vollet told The Province Friday.

"This is going to be a totally new building," he said of the facility, which will cost upwards of $2 million.

The building will provide 103 supported-housing units, of which 30 units will be dedicated to youth between the ages of 16 and 24.

"This is part of the bigger picture," Vollet said.

"The 2011 homeless count showed a 29-per-cent increase in youth homelessness in Metro Vancouver . . .

"Youth are good at being the hidden homeless."

By finding them stable accommodation, he added, "it starts to break the cycle of homelessness and shows them there is hope."

The development will be operated by the Vancouver Native Housing Society.

The society will provide tenants with access to community-based mental and physical health care and addictions services, in addition to life-skills training, which includes household management, meal preparation, money management and community living.

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/prof...#ixzz1nh9PhTDT
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Old March 1st, 2012, 06:59 AM   #228
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Hed_Kandi,

Just making sure you read this.
Added 1300 Richards.
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Old April 19th, 2012, 02:27 PM   #229
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Vancouver council approves $150-million Rize development
By FRANK LUBA, The Province
April 17, 2012
Excerpt

A group opposed to the controversial Rize Alliance development, which was passed Tuesday by Vancouver council, is already considering a legal challenge to the $150-million project.

Lewis Villegas of the Residents Association of Mount Pleasant [RAMP] confirmed that going to court is an option to fight Rize, which includes a 19-storey residential condominium tower with 241 units and a two-level commercial ‘podium’ or base of 72,000 square feet.

Some residents are unhappy with the height of the tower on the site at the corner of Kingsway and Broadway in the historic neighbourhood, along with the massive commercial podium they fear is going to be big-box retail with all the accompanying transport truck traffic.

The site was one earmarked for growth in the community plan but was rezoned to a higher level of density, for which the city got $4.5 million in Community Amenity Contributions and $1.75 million for affordable housing.

**********************

Villegas had come up with a lower-height alternative plan for the Rize site based on the current C-3A zoning that would have a built area of 159,000 square feet and a floor space ratio of 3.0.

What was approved Tuesday is a total floor area of 297,461 square feet and a floor space ratio of 5.55, along with 320 underground parking spots.

**********************

Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/news/Vanc...#ixzz1sPd0sD2K
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Old June 7th, 2012, 05:38 PM   #230
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June 7

Added Murray hotel proposal to first page
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Old June 26th, 2012, 01:57 PM   #231
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Organic forms inspire Fast + Epp's VanDusen Botanical Gardens Visitor Centre

Located in the heart of Vancouver, the VanDusen Botanical Gardens Visitor Centre is inspired by the organic forms of a native orchid. Requiring extensive collaboration between the architect and the structural engineer, the project's most innovative feature is the dramatic free-form roof structure. Appearing to float above the building's curved rammed earth walls, the roof form metaphorically represents undulating petals, flowing seamlessly into a central occulus and the surrounding landscape.

The design team pioneered a wood solution in the interests of economy, sustainability, innovation, and to meet tight time constraints imposed by a federal government stimulus funding programme. While similarly complex building forms-like Spain's Guggenheim Bilbao Museum or the Music Experience Building in Seattle, Washington-have been achieved through the use of steel or concrete, this is believed to be the first example of panelized wood use for such a geometrically complex form.

Curving along all three axes, the roof consists of 71 different panels, each with a different geometric form but similar framing system. Engineers were able to tackle a complex problem by breaking the project down into manageable pieces - trapezoidal-shaped roof panel modules that were typically within a 3.6-metre-wide by 18-metre-long shipping size. The units consisted of doubly-curved glulam edge beams and sawn timber joists spanning between them. Part of the ingenuity of this simple panelized approach was using the curved glulams as a "jig" in the shop to frame the complex geometry

All panels were prefabricated and pre-installed with thermal insulation, sprinkler pipes, lighting conduits, acoustic liner, and wood ceiling slats. Comprised entirely of FSC-certified Douglas fir, the roof structure supports an extensive green roof, carefully designed to include native plants and connect to the ground plane to encourage use by local fauna. The design team also collaborated to produce a novel, universal ‘one-size-fits-all' panel-to-column connection to accommodate unique geometric conditions at every support location.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=19962







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Old June 27th, 2012, 03:55 AM   #232
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vancouver is one of the best places for architects!
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Old July 4th, 2012, 02:53 PM   #233
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Added 750 Pacific Blvd.
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Old July 4th, 2012, 05:08 PM   #234
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That visitor center looks wondrous!
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Old July 12th, 2012, 04:56 AM   #235
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This is an awesome page and a great tool for those who love vancouver and love new development. But I have to ask, who wrote that intro to Vancouver and where are they from.

I would guess that it was an American, someone in the tourist trade. If Vancouver is in the Pacific Northwest, then where is Alaska? As a part of British Columbia, it really is part of the Pacific SOUTHwest, but nobody calls it that. I would say that Canadians call it the west coast, and British Columbians call it the coast or the lower mainland, but more likely just Vancouver.

NOT the NORTHwest.

Adam Fitch, a proud Vancouverite.
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Old July 12th, 2012, 04:59 AM   #236
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Keep in mind that the Van Duzen Gardens visitor centre is not a visitor centre for all of Vancouver. It is simply a visitor centre for a large, but not that well-known, botanical garden.
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Old July 12th, 2012, 05:07 AM   #237
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alot denser then i though... almost like hong kong
The downtown area of Vancouver is definitely dense, but less dense than Toronto, Montreal, New York, Chicago or San Fransico. Definitely way less dense than Hong Kong.

The reason that it looks so dense compared to many places is that the high density development comes right down next to the seashore, and then there are other areas across small bits of water where one can view the downtown from. So there are many fantastic photos of the downtown. If one uses a foreshortening lens, as many photographers do, it makes it look much denser than it otherwise would.
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Old July 12th, 2012, 05:16 AM   #238
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Vancouver still has bit of a small town culture and has to shake that off before it can become a world city. And most of the Highrises dt are condos.
There is no real industry in the city, thus it is heavily relying on the 2010 WINTER games for economic growth.

Still, the skyline does look nice for a city with barely 600,000 people.
Well, a couple of corrections are in order here. Yes, the CITY of Vancouver has a pop of 600K. but the metropolitan region is around 2.2 million, so it is not a small city on a north american basis.

It is now 2 and half years after the 2010 olympics, and the Vancouver economy is doing bettter than almost anywhere else in the Canada and the US.

I think the main industries in Vancouver are mining development, where Vancouver is a global industry leader, and many associated industries, such as legal, engineering and banking and financial services.

But real estate development is definitely a big economic driver. I don't think it is sustainable in the long term.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 03:24 PM   #239
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Vancouver unveils plan to replace viaducts with 'super road', more housing
‘Super road’ may mean early death for viaducts ‘Super road’ may mean early death for viaducts ‘Super road’ may mean early death for viaducts
By Jeff Lee, Vancouver Sun
July 24, 2012

The Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts could be demolished almost immediately, paving the way for new housing and a neighbourhood park system, if the plan is approved by council this fall.

On Tuesday, city transportation planners unveiled a new plan to create a “super road” around the north end of False Creek that would allow for the accelerated destruction of the viaducts and create more than 850,000 square feet of new housing space in Strathcona. It would also affect several other planned changes, including the construction of a long-awaited truck bypass route along Malkin Street.

The plan has yet to be approved, and the planners will bring back a final version within months, but the general proposal received thumbs up from both Vision Vancouver and Non-Partisan Association councillors.

Mayor Gregor Robertson said the ambitious project still has to meet the support of neighbouring residents as well as downtown businesses affected by the removal of the viaducts.

“I’m not prepared to say we’re there yet, but I think we’re getting closer,” he said. “This is a big, big decision for Vancouver and the future of the eastern core. It will be a big influence on how we connect and how we respond to the needs of neighbourhoods like Chinatown, Strathcona, Grandview-Woodlands for many decades to come.”

In removing the aging elevated roadways, the last vestige of Vancouver’s short-lived fling with a freeway, the city would unlock land that could either be turned into parks, traded with adjacent landowners or sold in order to create more affordable housing in the neighbourhood.

The plan calls for a new road that sweeps north from Pacific Boulevard and links up with Prior, Main and Quebec streets. Georgia Street would be extended to Pacific down a five per cent grade so gentle planners say it will accommodate people in wheelchairs.

Westbound vehicle access to Dunsmuir would stop, but a bicycle and pedestrian bridge would connect from a planned park to Dunsmuir Street above.

The proposal also calls for a broad bicycle and pedestrian mall on the west side of a future park linking Carrall Street with False Creek, and an additional 13 per cent park space could be added to the 9 hectares (22 acres) already committed for completion.

Transportation Planning Director Jerry Dobrovolny told council removing the eastern approaches of viaducts would also give the city back two blocks between Quebec and Gore streets, including Hogan’s Alley, that were once part of the city’s vibrant black population. Those two blocks, if developed correctly, could generate 850,000 square feet of housing and retail space and could help pay for the cost of demolishing the viaducts.

A previous plan considered by the transportation department would have kept the viaducts in place for 15 years. But Dobrovolny said under the new scenario, the viaducts could be removed almost immediately as the neighbourhood parks are built without negatively affecting traffic. He said public consultation surveys showed that nearly 70 per cent support or strongly support the plan.

Dobrovolny told reporters later the timeline for removal was contingent on other development and reconstruction in the neighbourhood, but that there was no long-term obstacle to removal of the viaducts. He suggested the project could cost up to $100 million, but much of the money could come from the city’s sale of development rights on land currently under the viaducts.

Robertson said before staff come back in the fall for a final decision he wants to make sure five issues are addressed, including advancing work on the long-planned Malkin Street connector, a truck bypass route from Clark Drive around the north end of the False Creek flats to Main Street. That route would take much of the traffic that now uses Prior Street, which has been a constant source of anger for local residents.

The city also expects the Malkin connector, which could cost $40 million, would attract financial support from the federal and provincial governments as it would eliminate several at-grade rail crossings and give the province better access to land it wants for a new health centre.

Robertson said local residents also need “clear timelines” for when the park next to False Creek will be built. That project, the last part of the 25-year-old Concord Pacific development, has been stalled while the city and the developer negotiate over road alignments and density allotments of the last adjacent construction project.

The proposed changes, from the creation of additional parks and more affordable housing, must also meet the city’s new strategy for creating high-value jobs, the mayor said. And he also wants assurance the flow of goods and commerce into the downtown core won’t be affected by the removal of the viaducts.

NPA Coun. George Affleck said he’s in support of the proposal, with some reservations.

“My personal opinion is about the impact on businesses and communities. If in fact this can work without negative impact, I think it is better to have a normal streetscape as opposed to a highway, which is what this is, going through our city,” he said.

The idea of removing the old viaducts, first proposed by Vision Coun. Geoff Meggs, was embraced by city staff after they set aside concerns that removing them would be “a showstopper” for the thousands of cars and trucks that use them daily.

“The viaducts were built at a time and in a context that made sense,” said Kevin McNaney, the city’s assistant director of planning. “They crossed industrial land, which no longer exists, they were built to be part of a freeway system, which was never built, and they were built to a capacity that we can never achieve. So the question for council over the coming months and this coming fall, is: ‘Is there a better, more coherent vision, and how can we get there?’”

The viaducts were built in the 1960s to carry as many as 1,800 vehicles an hour. But less than half that number use the viaducts now and that amount is declining as improvements to public transportation are made, Dobrovolny said.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Van...#ixzz21dWYef2x
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Old July 28th, 2012, 04:08 PM   #240
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Sauder School of Business / Acton Ostry Architects

Architects: Acton Ostry Architects
Location: University of British Columbia, Sauder School of Business, Henry Angus Building, 2053 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z2, Canada
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 271,000 sq ft
Client: UBC Property Trust
Photographs: Martin Tessler, Nic Lehoux, Acton Ostry Architects

Source: www.archdaily.com























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