daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 2nd, 2006, 07:46 AM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

US Air Traffic Controller Shortage

Controllers say staff shortages are everywhere
By LESLIE MILLER
1 September 2006

WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. air traffic controllers say they have to keep track of more airplanes with fewer people as the Federal Aviation Administration tries to control costs for operating air traffic control facilities.

The staff shortage has forced some controllers to handle double-duty -- simultaneously directing airplanes on the ground and monitoring air traffic by radar, much like the solo air traffic controller in Lexington, Kentucky, last weekend when a commuter plane crashed trying to take off on the wrong runway.

While FAA acknowledges short-staffing at Lexington Blue Grass Airport and a handful of other small airports, air traffic controllers say the problem extends to major airports around the country and is compromising safety.

"It isn't just about one-person midnight shifts and airports like LEX," said Ruth Marlin, executive vice president for the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. "The FAA is short-staffed at O'Hare, Atlanta and Dallas towers. If you don't have enough people, you either can't provide the service or can't maintain the safety margin."

There are 1,081 fewer controllers now than three years ago. Their numbers dropped from 15,386 in September 2003 to 14,305 in August 2006, according to the FAA.

As of May, Chicago O'Hare had 52 controllers, though it's authorized to have 71; Atlanta had 39 on staff, though authorized for 55; and Dallas-Fort Worth has 48, though authorized for 59, according to a report aviation expert Darryl Jenkins prepared for the controllers association.

FAA chief Marion Blakey disagrees.

"Overall, across the country, we do not have a shortage of air-traffic controllers," Blakey said at a news conference Thursday in Louisville, Kentucky.

Blakey said a second controller working during the crash in Lexington might not have made a difference, since that controller likely would be working in the radar room.

Blakey has been under pressure from Congress to both cut costs and to hire more controllers. On Aug. 24, she reported to Congress that the FAA will hire 930 new controllers by October.

Other costs will be cut so the agency can afford to hire more controllers, the report said.

Efficiencies will include cutting workers' compensation and overtime costs, reducing training time and matching the number of controllers at a facility to the amount of air traffic.

The Lexington controller, a 17-year veteran whose name has not been released, had worked from 6:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, then returned to work at 11:30 p.m. on the same day to begin an eight-hour overnight shift. Investigators said he'd had only two hours of sleep.

Wayne Minnick, a former air traffic controller who runs a consulting business in Missouri, said it's common for controllers who have a quick shift turnaround to get little to no sleep.

"The quick turnaround, like having nine hours off between shifts, that happens all the time," said Minnick, who was a controller for 22 years. "Sometimes you try to grab two to three hours between shifts when you have a quick turnaround like that."

Two years ago, Los Angeles International Airport's control tower was understaffed by about half the normal level when a tired air traffic controller was involved in the near-crash of two airliners, according to safety investigators.

The controller positioned a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 on the same runway where an Asiana Airlines jumbo jet had been cleared to land. The Asiana pilot saw the Southwest jet and pulled up as alarms sounded in the control tower. The airplanes missed each other by 200 feet (60 meters).

Dr. Charles Czeisler, professor of sleep medicine at Harvard Medical School, said the Lexington controller's sleep deprivation meant it was likely he suffered attention lapses and he took three times as long to react to things.

For the average person who's been on duty for 17 of the previous 24 hours and has had two hours of sleep, "the impairment is comparable to being legally drunk," Czeisler said.

------

Associated Press writer Dylan T. Lovan in Louisville, Kentucky, contributed to this report.

------

On the Net:

Federal Aviation Administration: http://www.faa.gov

National Air Traffic Controllers Association: http://www.natca.org
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 2nd, 2006, 10:23 AM   #2
ChicagoSkyline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chicago[Naperville-SW Suburb] + Miami[Miami Beach & South Beach]
Posts: 2,097
Likes (Received): 29

Chicago has the highest shortage in US and the most stressful on the earth!
ChicagoSkyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2008, 09:37 AM   #3
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

Feds to audit air traffic controllers' workload in Chicago area
7 January 2008

CHICAGO (AP) - The U.S. Transportation Department says it will formally investigate the work conditions of Chicago-area air traffic controllers amid the increasing frequency of controller errors.

The agency's Office of Inspector General announced the audit Monday in response to a request last month by U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois.

The audit will involve controllers at O'Hare International Airport and air traffic control facilities in Elgin and Aurora, and will evaluate key factors that could contribute to controller fatigue, the inspector general's office said.

The National Transportation Safety Board has cited fatigue as a potential contributing factor to the recent errors.

The agency also says it will examine what measures the Federal Aviation Administration has taken to mitigate potential controller fatigue at those locations.

Durbin's request last month came a week after the General Accountability Office released a study showing that O'Hare had the second-highest number of near-collisions on runways between 2001 and 2006. A spokeswoman for the senator did not immediately return a phone call following the audit announcement.

Controllers in the Chicago region and elsewhere say they are weary and more error-prone after having to work repeated six-day weeks due to staffing level changes. The Federal Aviation Administration has said that staffing levels are adequate despite controllers' complaints.

National Air Traffic Controllers Association President Patrick Forrey said he was grateful for Durbin's request for an investigation "in what is among the some of the busiest and most complex airspace in the national airspace system."

"I think what the OIG will find is too few certified controllers and, actually, too many trainees, who are not getting adequate training and are being rushed through the process due to the critical staffing shortage," Forrey said in a statement. "Additionally, the FAA has absolutely no plan to address the record attrition levels of both veteran controllers and trainees."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 4th, 2008, 09:51 AM   #4
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

FAA speeds air traffic-controller hiring process; union calls latest move a 'smoke screen'
15 February 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) - The government says it can trim a month or more off the hiring process for air-traffic controllers.

The union representing those workers says the move is nothing more than a "smoke screen" to mask a system plagued by safety and efficiency problems.

The nation's traveling public says: Just do something to get my plane in the air on time.

The Federal Aviation Administration on Friday said it has created a system to streamline security clearances, medical screenings, and other steps new controllers must go through. Those tests and screenings can now be completed in about two weeks, down from about two months, an FAA spokeswoman said.

The FAA has been locked in a contract dispute with the union representing air traffic controllers since 2006. While the agency insists staffing has no impact on flight delays, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association says congestion problems will worsen unless the government hires more controllers and pays them more.

Chicago-area air traffic controllers have said they are weary and more error-prone after having to work repeated six-day weeks due to staffing level changes. The FAA has said staffing levels are adequate despite controllers' complaints.

But last month, the Transportation Department inspector general opened an investigation of controller work conditions at O'Hare and FAA facilities in Elgin and Aurora. A Government Accountability Office study reported in December that O'Hare had the second-highest number of near-collisions on runways between 2001 and 2006.

More than 26 percent of commercial flights in the U.S. arrived late or were canceled last year, the second worst showing since comparable data began being collected in 1995, trailing only the results from 2000, the Transportation Department said last week.

Lawmakers, congressional investigators, the Transportation Department's inspector general and others this week expressed concerns about controller staffing and its effect on runway safety.

The Government Accountability Office in December found that runway safety incidents affecting commercial airlines spiked in fiscal 2007. The GAO cited FAA leadership, malfunctioning technology and overworked controllers.

The air-traffic controllers union "will not allow the FAA to put up these smoke screens and try and distract attention from the real issue ... (the) treatment of its current work force that has now needlessly risked the safety and efficiency of the system," union spokesman Doug Church wrote in an e-mail. "If the FAA truly wants to do something to address the controller shortage, it will resume contract negotiations."

The Air Transport Association of America, which represents the nation's largest carriers, said it relies on the FAA to determine controller staffing levels.

More than 90 candidates were interviewed last month at the new processing center at the FAA's regional office in New York. The first hires to participate in the process received job offers within two weeks and will start at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City this month. Other centers will be established this spring in the busy hubs of Atlanta, Chicago and elsewhere, according to the agency.

The FAA plans to hire more than 1,800 new controllers this year and increase total controller staffing to more than 15,000. But the union says more than six veteran controllers per day retired between Oct. 1 and Jan. 5, which was twice the rate the FAA expected and faster than new hires are being trained and certified.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2008, 06:13 AM   #5
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

FAA ties to lure air traffic controllers to Alaska
2 July 2008

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - The Federal Aviation Administration is trying to fill badly understaffed air traffic control centers in Alaska by offering bonuses of tens of thousands of dollars to experienced workers willing to move to the 49th state.

"To some extent, the FAA must be agreeing with us that staffing is bad," Rick Thompson, vice president of the National Air Traffic Controllers Association in Alaska, said of the transfer offers. "For years, they put things off. And now I guess they're admitting they did."

The FAA is offering to pay relocation costs and says that those wanting to make the move should apply by Tuesday. Workers making the move north are in line for a bonus of $25,000 to $75,000 a year.

An FAA spokesman in Renton, Wash., said the agency would not comment in any detail on the bonuses, the air traffic controller shortages in Alaska or the transfer offers.

"However, generally speaking, the agency continues to use a variety of recruitment and retention flexibilities to attract and retain qualified air traffic controllers," spokesman Allen Kenitzer said in an e-mail.

In its posting announcing the openings in Anchorage and Fairbanks, the federal agency doesn't call for a specific number of volunteers, nor does it detail the staffing deficiencies in Alaska.

The shortages in Alaska, and other parts of the country, stem in large part from the upheaval in air traffic controlling of the early 1980s, when President Reagan fired more than 11,000 controllers. The large crop hired in the immediate aftermath of that are now reaching the age of retirement.

"People are leaving when they are eligible to," Thompson said. "They just don't want to work there anymore."

Thompson said he wouldn't say air travelers in Alaska are at risk with the shortage of air traffic controllers. He said the consequences have caused more spacing between planes and more flight delays.

The FAA and the union have been at a standoff in negotiating a new work contract since 2005, when the old contract expired. The union also has blamed work rules imposed by the FAA after the contract expired for contributing to low morale and the loss of experienced controllers.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2008, 02:01 AM   #6
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,438
Likes (Received): 612

I don't think anyone wants the job. I sure as hell wouldn't. How much is the pay?
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 04:30 AM   #7
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

FAA broadens effort to split up controllers' duties; union worries about safety, less training
20 October 2008

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - The Federal Aviation Administration is realigning the duties of air traffic controllers in some cities, a move that critics say will mean less training for the people responsible for the safety of the flying public.

Faced with a nationwide shortage of controllers, the FAA says it wants to streamline training by dividing the job of air traffic controllers into two specialties. In January, controllers in Memphis and Orlando, Fla. -- now trained to work in their airport towers as well as companion radar centers -- will be restricted to one job or the other.

"It's simply focusing their training to do precisely what they're going to be doing," FAA spokesman Paul Takemoto said.

Some lawmakers and the controllers' union say the change will allow the FAA to certify controllers with fewer training hours than the current standard.

"It masks their staffing problems," said Victor Santore, regional vice president of the Air Traffic Controllers Association.

The union also argues that the new job descriptions will cut controllers' salaries by 4 percent to 8 percent and limit staffing flexibility in emergencies.

Radar centers called TRACONs, for Terminal Radar Approach Control, direct aircraft for landings and takeoffs up to 50 miles from their airports. Towers handle planes when they're within five miles of an airport or on the ground. More than 40 percent of the FAA's 315 air traffic control facilities have towers with companion radar centers.

John Wallin, president of the union local in Memphis, said training controllers to work in both airport towers and radar centers improves coordination between the groups as they work to keep planes safely spread out over busy airports.

He called the FAA's move dangerous.

"Controllers who work in the tower will no longer have the experience that radar controllers have and that could lead to a disaster because they're not going to know what each other is doing," he said.

The FAA's move to split the tower and radar center jobs is not new. More than 20 of the busiest airports in the U.S., including those in Atlanta and Chicago, already operate that way.

But Wallin said those airports get the most experienced controllers, many of them with both tower and radar experience earned in smaller cities like Memphis.

The FAA also has looked into splitting the controllers' job functions at cities including Cleveland, San Antonio, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Tampa, Fla., and Charlotte, N.C. Moves to split the work in towers and radar centers at Miami and Philadelphia were recently scaled back following complaints from members of Congress and others who argued the plans needed more study and input from outside the FAA.

Sen. Robert Casey, D-Pa., joined other Pennsylvania lawmakers in opposing the plans, arguing that "any action that would dilute staff would dilute safety," his office said.

The FAA hired most of its 14,800 controllers within a few years of a 1981 strike that ended when former President Reagan fired the strikers.

Rep. Jerry Costello, chairman of the House subcommittee on aviation, said the FAA has failed to lay the groundwork to replace so many experienced controllers, and has caused early retirements by refusing to negotiate since 2006 on a new work contract.

Costello, D-Ill., said the agency must get more controllers on the job, but any moves to lessen certification requirements will draw a congressional review, "if in fact that is taking place."

Nationwide, about a fourth of air traffic controllers are in training, meaning they need on-the-job supervision, and the transportation department's inspector general says that may increase to 30 percent over the next four years as more new controllers are hired.

Memphis has 62 controllers, 45 of whom are fully certified. The rest are in training, and up to 10 more trainees are expected next year. Though several of the older hands are likely to retire soon, Wallin said, the number of controllers deemed fully certified will increase after the job split.

"They can go to Congress and say, 'Look, we fixed Memphis,'" he said. "'We now have 54 or 55 fully certified controllers, some in radar and some in the tower.'"
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 21st, 2008, 08:05 AM   #8
world1
YAAY! IM 17!
 
world1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: bangalore
Posts: 367
Likes (Received): 2

actually i want to be an ATCO.....but lol....i donno wat to do...im doing science right now....
__________________
A government big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you have!!
world1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 5th, 2010, 08:27 AM   #9
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

Safety experts: Air traffic control incidents point to complacency, signal wider problems
4 March 2010

WASHINGTON (AP) - For the third time in seven months, the judgment of those who operate the nation's air traffic control system has been called into question and concerns have been raised that complacency may be causing controllers and their supervisors to bend rules.

While major air crashes have declined sharply over the last decade, thanks largely to improved technology, aviation safety experts say they are seeing signs that vigilance may have eroded.

The latest incident was reported this week: A controller twice brought a child to work at the control tower at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, one of the nation's busiest airports, and allowed the child to radio instructions to pilots. The Federal Aviation Administration has suspended the controller and his supervisor pending an investigation of the incident last month.

"This is a stunning example of a lack of professionalism, not following the rules, not using commonsense," Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood told a Senate committee Thursday.

The FAA has declined to identify the controller, but a person with knowledge of the situation identified him Thursday as Glenn Duffy, a 20 year veteran of the job with experience at several of the big air hubs that serve New York. The person spoke with The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk about the case. In the late 1990s, Duffy was a frequent critic of the FAA while serving as the union representative for controllers at Newark Liberty International Airport.

The problems with safety and vigilance extends to airline pilots as well. In several accidents in recent years -- the crash of a regional airliner in upstate New York a year ago that killed 50 people is one example -- pilots broke a cardinal safety rule prohibiting nonessential conversation during landing approaches.

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, said he couldn't understand what the controller was thinking.

"You would think he would know better," said Bloomberg, a trained pilot. "It was certainly inappropriate."

Other recent incidents:

--In October, controllers in Minneapolis handed off responsibility for a Northwest Airlines jet without alerting the next controller that they had been unable to make radio contact with the plane. Supervisors also failed to follow procedures for alerting a national security communications network to the problem. As a result, the Airbus A320 carrying 144 passengers was out of radio contact for 69 minutes before the security network was alerted. Rules put in place after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks are supposed to trigger an alert when a plane can't be raised by radio for 10 minutes.

The larger issue at play in the incident, however, was the conduct of the cockpit crew on the Northwest plane, who flew more than 100 miles past their destination. The Federal Aviation Administration revoked the flying licenses of two pilots, who are now appealing to have them reinstated.

--Last August, an air traffic controller at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey who handed off a private plane to controllers at a neighboring airport failed to correct the plane's pilot when he read back the wrong radio frequency. Controllers at both airports later tried unsuccessfully to reach the pilot. The plane collided moments later with a tour helicopter over the Hudson River. Three people in the plane and six in the helicopter were killed. The Teterboro controller was chitchatting on the phone with a female friend until seconds before the collision. The controller's supervisor had left the airport to run a personal errand.

The incidents suggest a casualness about rules that undermines safety, said Carol Carmody, a former National Transportation Safety Board member and former FAA official.

Even more serious is that the controllers in the Teterboro and Kennedy incidents appear to have felt free to break rules, which suggests supervisors tolerated such lapses, said Michael Barr, who teaches aviation safety at the University of Southern California.

FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown said the incidents were "isolated occurrences" and not indicative of a broader safety problem.

The FAA is implementing a new program that encourages air traffic controllers to report safety problems, including their own mistakes, so that the agency can spot trends and act to prevent future problems, Brown said. To encourage reporting, controllers aren't punished for errors they identify.

The agency has had a similar program for pilots for nearly a decade.

FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt, in speeches and congressional testimony, has called on pilots and air traffic controllers to create a professional atmosphere in cockpits and radar facilities and not to tolerate rule-breaking by colleagues.

The NTSB is concerned enough about the situation that it has scheduled a forum this spring on pilot and air traffic controller professionalism.

In a statement responding to the Kennedy incident, the National Air Traffic Controllers Association -- the union that represents controllers -- said it doesn't "condone this type of behavior in any way."

But Mary Schiavo, a former Transportation Department inspector general who has filed a lawsuit against the FAA on behalf of the families of five Italian tourists killed in the Hudson River collision, said there needs to be a strong message sent from the top. She suggested Babbitt and LaHood call "an all-hands-on-deck meeting and make sure air traffic controllers know it's every rule every time."

------

Associated Press writer David B. Caruso in New York City contributed to this report.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 27th, 2011, 08:18 AM   #10
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

FAA Chief Revises Air-Traffic Control Procedures, Orders Nationwide Review
26 March 2011
16:53
DOW JONES NEWSWIRES

U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Randy Babbitt said that he has implemented an "interim plan" affecting air-traffic control system procedures following an incident at Washington's Reagan National Airport.

In a statement posted Friday on the FAA's website, Babbitt also said he has ordered a nationwide review of the system.

Earlier this week, Babbitt suspended an air-traffic controller who dozed off while two jetliners landed at Reagan National without communicating with the airport tower.

"Effective immediately, we are instituting an interim plan to ensure we do not repeat another situation like the one at Reagan National Airport Wednesday morning," Babbitt said in the statement.

Babbitt said he has directed all radar controllers to contact air-traffic control towers at selected airports to confirm that there is a controller prepared to handle an incoming flight, adding that overnight staffing at those airports will be reviewed. He also said he has reminded controllers that "proper procedures dictate that they must offer pilots the option to divert to another airport if they do not make contact with the control tower."

The FAA chief said the nationwide system review is to "confirm the appropriate backup procedures and equipment are in place and in use."

Statement at http://www.faa.gov/news/press_releas...m?newsId=12578
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2011, 10:23 AM   #11
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,944
Likes (Received): 18212

Report says more than a fifth of FAA's hires for air traffic control fail to finish training
2 April 2011

WASHINGTON (AP) - More than one in five of air traffic controllers hired by the Federal Aviation Administration in recent years washed out before finishing their training, said a report released Friday by a government watchdog.

The FAA has been underestimating the number of new hires who didn't finish their training because of flaws in the methodology the agency was using, the Transportation Department's inspector general said in a report posted online.

Using a different methodology, the inspector general said 22 percent of new controllers who should have completed their training last year didn't. In 2009, 21 percent failed to complete their training, and in 2008 it was 31 percent.

FAA had previously estimated a 9 percent attrition rate for new controllers in 2009.

Measuring the attrition rate of new hires and understanding what causes trainees to drop out is important to FAA right now. The agency is struggling to hire 11,000 controllers by 2019 to make up for a wave of retirements.

Controllers are required to retire by age 56. Many of today's controllers were hired in the wake of President Ronald Reagan's firing of striking controllers in 1981 and have begun reaching retirement age.

FAA currently employs about 15,700 controllers, said agency spokeswoman Laura Brown. The agency agrees with the inspector general's findings and has begun using the new methodology, she said.

Not everyone can be a controller. The agency gives potential controllers aptitude tests before they are hired.

FAA looks for people who are good at focusing their attention, multitasking and prioritizing, she said. A good sense of distance and the ability to visualize objects three-dimensionally is also prized.

"Historically there has been a relatively high rate of people who aren't able to bring all those skills together," Brown said. "You discover that along the way. That's why there's such an extensive training program."

The time it takes controllers to complete training varies, but FAA's goal is that they finish within two to three years depending upon the type of facility to which they are assigned, the report said.

FAA's controller workforce is under increased scrutiny following two high-profile suspensions of controllers over the past two weeks. Two airliners landed at Reagan National airport near Washington last week without the aid of a controller because the lone controller on duty overnight, a supervisor, had fallen asleep. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood ordered two controllers be assigned to the Reagan airport tower at night and a review of overnight staffing at other airports is underway.

Earlier this week, FAA said another supervisor directing air traffic in central Florida created an incident in which a Southwest Airlines jet with 142 people on board came too close to a small plane, endangering both aircraft.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating both incidents.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium