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Old May 13th, 2005, 08:47 PM   #21
superchan7
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What I noticed is that Hong Kong's train cars are quite long compared to most other heavy rail systems. I usually see 3-4 pairs of doors per car in most metros, but HK's has 5 for all MTR and KCR lines. One train car is actually quite long, and MTR runs 8 of these per train. KCR runs 12 car trains on its main line.

Other cities that have 5 door pairs per compartment are Shenzhen and Guangzhou. Any others?
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Old May 14th, 2005, 03:13 AM   #22
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NYC had 10-car trains...once upon a time in the 80's, didn't they?
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Old May 14th, 2005, 05:20 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7
What I noticed is that Hong Kong's train cars are quite long compared to most other heavy rail systems. I usually see 3-4 pairs of doors per car in most metros, but HK's has 5 for all MTR and KCR lines. One train car is actually quite long, and MTR runs 8 of these per train. KCR runs 12 car trains on its main line.

Other cities that have 5 door pairs per compartment are Shenzhen and Guangzhou. Any others?
I think the length of train cars is generally the same. Its just that MTR & KCR fits in more doors into each train car side for more passengers to embark/disembark easily and quickly.
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Old May 16th, 2005, 01:14 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nikko
NYC had 10-car trains...once upon a time in the 80's, didn't they?
It still does, BMT/IND lines generally have either 8 75 foot cars or 10 60 foot cars (there are some exceptions), and the IRT lines (with the exception of the 42nd street shuttle, which has the shortest trains in the system) have 10 or more 50 foot cars.
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Old May 16th, 2005, 11:57 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_nick
It still does, BMT/IND lines generally have either 8 75 foot cars or 10 60 foot cars (there are some exceptions), and the IRT lines (with the exception of the 42nd street shuttle, which has the shortest trains in the system) have 10 or more 50 foot cars.
Ohh okay.

Do people generally still differentiate between the different companies?

Because it would probably start to get confusing for people not used to the system.
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Old May 16th, 2005, 03:32 PM   #26
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^Not really, they were integrated into the NYCT over 50 years ago, since then the BMT and IND have been integrated, but the IRT tunnels are somewhat narrower than the BMT/IND tunnels, which were built to the same standard. So BMT/IND trains can't go through IRT tunnels, and while IRT trains can go through BMT/IND tunnels, they can't use them for passenger service since the BMT/IND platforms were designed for wider trains.
They're now called the A and B divisions by the TA, but it's not used by the public. The only way you as a passenger can tell it's an IRT line is the numbered line(instead of lettered) and the narrower and shorter cars.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 06:43 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_nick
The only way you as a passenger can tell it's an IRT line is the numbered line(instead of lettered) and the narrower and shorter cars.
Don't forget that BMT/IND cars have 4 doors per side while IRT cars only 3 doors!
And because of the competition of these three systems there is a maze in Downtown Brooklyn - try to make a transfer from the IND to others at Hoyt-Schermerhorn!
Quote:
Originally Posted by mad_nick
with the exception of the 42nd street shuttle, which has the shortest trains in the system
(3 or 4 cars of R62 51'4" each) There is also the Franklin Shuttle with 2 cars 75' each (R68). Off-topic: Some portion of this line is a single rail. I rode this line twice or more and I like it. It's a victory of the local community over the MTA.


IRT's 7 line has 11 cars per train but it's only 168,3 m long.
The longest train in the BMT/IND system:
Most commonly trainsets:
8 cars 75' long each in a train = 183m.
8 or 10 cars 60' long = 146m or the same 183m long train.
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Old May 28th, 2005, 08:26 AM   #28
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New York City - Fulton Street Behind Schedule & Scaled Back

SUBWAY HUB FLUB. Overruns curb vision for Fulton St. station
PETE DONOHUE DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
26 May 2005
New York Daily News

THE MTA'S Fulton Street Transit Center - envisioned as an inspiring subway hub and a lower Manhattan beacon - has fallen a year behind schedule and is being scaled back to stay on budget.

The completion date has been pushed to December 2008, agency documents show.

The steel-and-glass dome that was to rise to a peak of 110 feet above street level from within the aboveground entrance hall - on Broadway between Fulton and John Sts. - will be significantly smaller, said Mysore Nagaraja, president of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Capital Construction Co.

The width of the underground Dey St. passageway to subway lines to the west will be 29 feet wide, not 40 feet.

Plans had to be scaled back because projected costs, including real estate acquisitions, have soared beyond the $750 million budget, officials said.

"What we are saying now is the new design is the economically elegant design," Nagaraja said.

The MTA board will be asked next month to give approval for work on the final design to begin.

The delay stems from the extensive environmental review process mandated by the federal government, Nagaraja said.

That took longer than expected and slowed progress on necessary property acquisitions.

The complex currently is a dingy, mazelike combination of several separate stations that serve 300,000 riders daily. Trains on the 2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, M and Z lines stop there.

Plans call for a natural light-infused station, with sunlight reaching platforms, and easier connections, officials say.

"It's going to be beautiful. It's going to change the landscape of lower Manhattan," Nagaraja promised.

But Beverly Dolinksy, head of the New York City Transit Riders Council, was concerned.

"I'm not happy that they are scaling it back and not happy about the delay, either," she said. "It's another delay in the rebuilding of downtown. This was supposed to be making a statement for present and future generations."
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Old May 29th, 2005, 05:19 AM   #29
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New York City to End Subway Photo Ban

NYC Abandons Plan to Ban Subway Photography
The Associated Press

NEW YORK A proposal to ban cameras in subways to prevent terrorism has been dropped by police and transit officials. The move comes a year after city transit officials came up with the idea to forbid photography, videotaping and filming in subway stations.

The New York Daily News reported in Sunday's editions that police and transit officials said a ban is not needed to secure the nation's largest mass transit system.

"Our officers will continue to investigate and intercede if necessary, if the activity _ photo-related or not _ is suspicious," police spokesman Paul Browne told the paper.

The proposal by NYC Transit, a division of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, had been criticized as too far-reaching by civil libertarians, photographers and some city officials.
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Old May 29th, 2005, 05:34 AM   #30
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thank god.

It would have sucked if they did ban it, no more great shots and it would ruin my hopes of photographing the subway when I visit NY. (I'm a bit of a railfan :P)

good news
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Old May 29th, 2005, 06:29 AM   #31
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On Sunday, service on the N line will be restored to Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue in Brooklyn and photo-ban has been canceled!

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Old June 20th, 2005, 07:02 AM   #32
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New York Subway takes first step towards automation

From the New York Times

On L Train, Drivers Perform Solo, Without Conductors

By SEWELL CHAN
Published: June 20, 2005

Conductors suddenly disappeared yesterday from the L line, but most subway riders did not seem to notice.

From now on, only one crew member, the train operator, will be on each L train during nights and on weekends. The change, which took effect just after midnight yesterday, is supposed to be the precursor to computerization of signals along the 10.2-mile route, which runs from Eighth Avenue in Manhattan to Rockaway Parkway in Brooklyn. The L train will still be staffed with two-person crews on weekdays.

Traditionally, each subway train has had both an operator and a conductor, who opens the doors and looks to make sure that the platform is clear before shutting them.

Along the L, which serves 5 stations in Manhattan and 19 in Brooklyn, New York City Transit has installed closed-circuit television cameras trained on the platform edges. Now the train operator can scan a bank of monitors while shutting the doors to verify that no one is caught in them before pulling out.

The transit agency printed signs and leaflets describing a "one-person train operation," as the conductorless arrangement is called, but most L riders seemed not to have seen them. "They should educate the passengers more so we'll know what's ahead of us," said Aneda Clarke, 57, a home health care aide who was riding home to Canarsie.

Upon being told about the change, riders had a range of views. "I very rarely even see a conductor on this train," said Craig A. Colbert, 43, who usually sits in the first car on his way to his job as a kitchen supervisor at a shelter in East Williamsburg.

Where transit officials see the march of progress, others have strong reservations. "Conductors serve more or less as security," said Anthony L. Gayle, 47, who works at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in Brooklyn. "If you travel late at night, you want to know that if something happens, you have someone to call upon," he added, noting that conductors are easily accessible to passengers because they occupy the middle of the train.

While the rides seemed smooth and uneventful yesterday morning and early afternoon, the train operation was not yet truly "one-person." Because it was the first day, each operator was accompanied by a train-service supervisor, who sat nearby and made sure that the operator checked the television monitors, opened and closed the doors properly and kept the train on schedule.

The L line employs a new generation of cars, the R143, designed to be run by computers and without a conductor. The cars have automated public-address systems that announce each station in a bland voice.

The L line is the first to have its electromechanical signals replaced by a system that uses radio frequencies and microprocessors to communicate train movements, but the $288 million project is more than a year behind schedule and will probably not begin operating until the end of this year, at the earliest.

One supervisor said he understood that eliminating conductors was a precursor to a more technologically advanced system, but admitted he had doubts. "When you have a lot of customers on a train, you need extra hands in case something happens," the supervisor, Stephan C. Grant, said. "I'm still used to the old way."

At the route's eastern terminus, the Canarsie-Rockaway Parkway station, four representatives from the Transport Workers Union of America, Local 100, asked the operators' opinions of the new system. The union bitterly opposes one-person train operation and has argued that conductors are essential to evacuating passengers during emergencies.

"In my view, Transit's ultimate goal is to have driverless trains, and this is only the first step," said Daniel J. Small, a train operator and union representative.

Curtis Tate, another train operator and union representative, said: "We're not trying to stop technology, but we do have to take into account the safety of our riding public and of our members."

The transit agency, part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, insists that the new system is safe because there is an emergency intercom in each car, and because the train cannot move until the doors are closed and locked. The operators on the L have received training and extensive instructions on what to do if they stop short of the monitors or overrun them.

Since 1996, one-person crews have operated a few other trains, mostly short ones that go short distances. For now, the L will be conductorless from midnight to 6 a.m. on weekdays and all day on weekends. At those times, trains will have 8 cars instead of the 10 used in peak periods.
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Old June 20th, 2005, 08:18 AM   #33
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Interesting, it would be cool if we could see pictures of this.
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Old June 20th, 2005, 04:24 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258
Interesting, it would be cool if we could see pictures of this.
The trains don't look any different than the other new trains on the subway.











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Old June 20th, 2005, 07:43 PM   #35
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Just to make sure, they do not have those 'NEXT STATION....' thing.
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Old June 20th, 2005, 09:05 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02
Just to make sure, they do not have those 'NEXT STATION....' thing.
They may not be up yet, but signs like those are being phased in.
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Old June 21st, 2005, 01:45 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asohn
They may not be up yet, but signs like those are being phased in.
Why didnt they did it whent he trains arrived?? I dont really think they need that IMO, they already have the 'The next stop is.....' on the top.

http://nycsubway.org/perl/show?3605
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Old June 21st, 2005, 06:00 AM   #38
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Awesome! It's about time NY caught up with the rest of the world's great cities in implementing modern technology into its transit system. I want to see LED/LCD displays in all the major stations soon giving countdowns to the next train arrival and other cool information.
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Old June 21st, 2005, 08:10 AM   #39
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^meh, those displays are practically worthless in older systems like NY- most Londoners I know consider them a cruel joke. They would be especially worthless in a four-track system with constant track/service changes- the money (and there is very little) would be better spent on other items, like expanding the system and keeping what is in place functional.

NYC MTA is not supported by federal funding anywhere near the levels in the other first world large cities, and even some third world.
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Old June 21st, 2005, 08:19 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02
Just to make sure, they do not have those 'NEXT STATION....' thing.
There are 2 bulkhead displays (below) in all the newish R-143 cars which flash time, line/destination and next station- but I haven't seen the particular side wall one above yet.

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