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Old April 25th, 2017, 04:45 AM   #4301
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I have. The real deal. Not a rail fan trip.Back in the 50s & 60s.

I remember those ads and public service placards. I'm 63 years young. Here's a few
Good health to you, sir! I could have only hoped my father made it to that age.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 07:33 AM   #4302
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Amazing. Thank you for sharing your pics. I will have to check out the transit museum. I've never been.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 05:29 PM   #4303
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So, according to the Board Meeting yesterday, the R211 order has gotten interesting.

The base order has increased from 435 to 535 cars.

450 R211A standard config cars because they are quicker to produce, 75 R211S cars for Staten Island, and the 10 R211T open gangway prototype cars.

Over the last couple weeks, the MTA has been testing open gangway clearances with a set of R143 cars.

The test must have been successful because the option cars will consist of 640 R211T cars.

Delivery of the base order R211A, R211S, and R211T cars is set to begin in 2020 with the option R211T cars commencing in 2023. This could change as we get closer.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 06:14 PM   #4304
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Late night non-revenue moves on 8th Avenue @ 181st and 190th:

Includes Garbage pickups 3 and 4, an R62A transfer from Corona to 207, the R179 transfer from 207 to Pitkin, and a bunch of work trains.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 06:21 PM   #4305
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What would an R62A be doing in 207 anyway?

If they were being transferred to the 6, shouldn't they be going to Westchester Yard?

(and besides, how do trains get from the Flushing line to the mainline IRT or to 207 anyway?)
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Old April 25th, 2017, 07:11 PM   #4306
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NYC will get 70 new subway cars before the end of the year


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The long-anticipated–and long-delayed–batch of about 70 shiny new subway cars will roll into stations before the end of the year according to the MTA as reported by AM New York. The new cars will replace the system’s oldest–and most breakdown-prone–cars on the J, Z and C lines. Another 230 more are scheduled to hit the MTA rails over the course of 2018. Steve Plochochi, the MTA’s vice president of procurement and material, called the cars’ arrival “long-awaited good news,” and outlined MTA plans for a “major design change” in subway cars for future models...

...Next to be announced were details for a following order of 1,025 subway cars scheduled for service by 2023. These cars will be drastically different from today’s, with updated interior and exterior color schemes and new digital display screens and wider doors. Most of those cars will also be open-ended, open-gangway cars, meaning each car will be connected with accordion-like walls that enable passengers to move easily between cars. “This is a big change,” Plochochi added, “and we are excited about this future for New York subway riders.”
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Old April 25th, 2017, 08:18 PM   #4307
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What would an R62A be doing in 207 anyway?

If they were being transferred to the 6, shouldn't they be going to Westchester Yard?

(and besides, how do trains get from the Flushing line to the mainline IRT or to 207 anyway?)
Wheel truing is done at 207 for Corona's fleet.

IRT Flushing to BMT Broadway to Atlantic, change ends, IND 6th Ave to IND 8th Ave to 207.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 08:22 PM   #4308
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Amazing. Thank you for sharing your pics. I will have to check out the transit museum. I've never been.
Thank you for the kind words..

Not my photos. I just know where to get them;

http://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/Main_Page
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Old April 25th, 2017, 09:20 PM   #4309
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So this means the R32s will be the FIRST to be replaced by the R179s, not the last or not at all?

For a while it seemed the R32s were gonna be pushed until the 2020s when they would be replaced by the R211s.

So the remaining R32s will begin to be replaced THIS year? Can't be all of them, 70 out of the couple hundred still in service.
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Old April 25th, 2017, 09:47 PM   #4310
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So this means the R32s will be the FIRST to be replaced by the R179s, not the last or not at all?

For a while it seemed the R32s were gonna be pushed until the 2020s when they would be replaced by the R211s.

So the remaining R32s will begin to be replaced THIS year? Can't be all of them, 70 out of the couple hundred still in service.
Half of the remaining R32s will be replaced according to what's been said over the last few months. The Canarsie shutdown will require some extra trains to handle the increased passenger volume on surrounding lines.

So the R42s will be completely gone and around 120 R32s (educated guess) will remain. The R211 will finish off the R32 it seems. Since the R211 delivery is slated to begin in 2020, I can see them gone by early to mid 2021 and then the R46 retirement can begin.
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Old April 26th, 2017, 03:17 AM   #4311
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Wheel truing is done at 207 for Corona's fleet.

IRT Flushing to BMT Broadway to Atlantic, change ends, IND 6th Ave to IND 8th Ave to 207.
Why not just go to Coney Island? It seems to be nearer...

And I presume getting to the mainline IRT from there would just be another reversal in 207 and then up the ramp to the 1?
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Old April 26th, 2017, 04:53 AM   #4312
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Manhattan circa 1900. "The Bowery, New York." The tracks of the Third Avenue El passing the Bowery Savings Bank.


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1997: A worker looks at the wreckage of a subway car in the 135th Street Station in New York early on July 4, 1997, following a derailment. Fifteen people were injured, two seriously, when the express train in Harlem derailed, leaving the unoccupied last car crushed and severed in half, according to police. (AP Photo/Emile Wamsteker)
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Old April 26th, 2017, 06:35 AM   #4313
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It's about time those old cars on the J/Z are replaced! Part of me likes the older trains, but they really do not work well on the J/Z at all. They're always partially mislabeled so I never know if I'm on a J or a Z, and the speakers are often so old and unclear that I don't know if it's express or local.

Also they tend to leak sometimes when it rains since they are mostly outdoors. I've also had one actually break down on me one time while I was on my way to work.
... it's time for them to retire!
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Old April 26th, 2017, 12:34 PM   #4314
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When I was in NYC 12 years ago we stayed at a hotel that's in the building at the end of that block. I think it's actually the same building as in that picture(!)
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Old April 26th, 2017, 09:30 PM   #4315
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Why not just go to Coney Island? It seems to be nearer...

And I presume getting to the mainline IRT from there would just be another reversal in 207 and then up the ramp to the 1?
Because 207 is the A division overhaul shop. Coney Island is the B division overhaul shop and it currently has its hands full with the SMS program.

To your second question, yes.
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Old April 29th, 2017, 07:00 PM   #4316
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IRT Lo-V 2017





IMG_7158 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7159 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7161 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7163 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7167 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7168 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7169 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7171 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7174 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7189 by GojiMet86, on Flickr

IMG_7194 by GojiMet86, on Flickr
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Old April 29th, 2017, 08:45 PM   #4317
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I really enjoy seeing the Low-v cars in action. Reminds me of the REAL New York....I can still hear the disincentive sound of a Low-v subway car



Now that's the sound of the REAL New York..luv it!!....Oh so many decades ago before most of you were born...
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Old May 1st, 2017, 07:03 PM   #4318
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Key to Improving Subway Service in New York? Modern Signals

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/01/n...y-signals.html

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At a subway station deep under Manhattan, a dingy room is filled with rows of antique equipment built before World War II. The weathered glass boxes and cloth-covered cables are not part of a museum exhibit, however — they are crucial pieces of the signal system that directs traffic in one of the busiest subways in the world.

Much of the signal equipment at that station, at West Fourth Street, is decades beyond its life span, and it is one of the main culprits plaguing the overburdened subway.

As New York City’s sprawling subway faces a deepening crisis over delays, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority says that modernizing the signals is a top priority. But the rollout of a new signal network is unfolding at a glacial pace even as the subway system is straining under the demands of a booming ridership. Two decades after the agency began its push to upgrade signals, work has been completed on just one line.

At the current pace, transforming every subway line could take half a century and cost $20 billion.

The signal system is the hidden, unglamorous backbone of the subway, controlling when trains can move down the tracks. But it is so outdated that it cannot identify precisely where trains are, requiring more room between them. And when it fails, trains stop, delays pile up and riders fume.

With a modern signal network, trains on the system could run closer together and therefore more frequently, allowing the subway to absorb more riders as the city’s population grows.

New York could find inspiration overseas. Another major city with an even older — although smaller — subway system is also confronting soaring ridership: London. It is further along in its ambitious effort to modernize its signals and has emerged as a global leader in how to upgrade an aging subway, offering lessons to New York and other cities.

London has installed a computerized signal network on four of its 10 main subway lines, and work is underway on four more. Of New York’s 22 lines, only the L train has the advanced signal system. A second line, the No. 7, may have it later this year, after a delay.

In New York, the plans have been hobbled by an anemic schedule for upgrading tracks, a struggle to secure necessary funding and logistical challenges on a system that never stops running. Officials have also been reluctant to anger riders by closing stations to do the work. It took about a decade to complete the signal network on the L line, and work on the No. 7 line has already taken nearly seven years.

Confronted with infrastructure dating to the 1930s and a vast system of 472 stations (the most of any subway in the world), officials are forced to decide which projects to prioritize with limited financing. The transportation authority asked for $3.2 billion for signal and communications work in its latest five-year capital proposal — about 10 percent of its $32 billion budget request — but $400 million was cut from the plan approved by state leaders last year. The request reflected the need, and it was higher than in the previous two capital plans, when the agency requested $2.4 billion, on average, for signals and communications.

Though many New Yorkers believe that Mayor Bill de Blasio runs the subways, the agency is, in fact, controlled by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo. Mr. Cuomo, a Democrat, like the mayor, was focused on finishing the first segment of the Second Avenue subway on time, but critics say he has shown far less urgency about the deteriorating condition of the subway’s signals. Transit advocates say the agency must pour more money into signal work and accelerate the schedule.

“Fifty years is way too far out there,” Thomas F. Prendergast, former chairman of the authority, said in his final interview before leaving the job in January. “We have to find a way to shorten that.”

Delay After Delay

New York’s more than century-old subway has been essential to the city’s growth, but there is increasing alarm that after years of progress, the system is sliding backward. To accommodate the nearly six million riders who take the subway on weekdays — the highest level since the 1940s — the authority is spending billions of dollars on new stations and more spacious trains.

The opening of the Second Avenue line and its ornately decorated stations in January was a high point for the agency, but the signal system — the least visible yet perhaps greatest challenge of all — remains mired in an analog era. Signal problems account for about 13 percent of all subway delays, and are the second most common reason for weekday delays, after overcrowding, according to statistics from the agency.

Worsening subway service is one of the many infrastructure challenges confronting the region, including recent commuting upheavals at Pennsylvania Station in New York. Amtrak, which owns the station, plans to close several tracks for repairs that will disrupt service this summer on New Jersey Transit and the Long Island Rail Road, two of the nation’s busiest commuter railroads.

Most of New York’s subway system still relies on antiquated technology, known as block signaling, to coordinate the movement of trains. A modern system, known as communications-based train control, or C.B.T.C., is more dependable and exact, making it possible to reduce the amount of space between trains.

A computerized signal system like C.B.T.C. is also safer because trains can be stopped automatically. New York’s quest to install the new system began in 1991, after a subway derailment at Union Square in Manhattan killed five people. The train operator was speeding after he had been drinking.

More than 25 years later, the authority has little to show for its effort to install modern signals. The L line began using computerized signals in 2009 after about a decade of work. A second line, the No. 7, should have received new signals last year, but the project was delayed until the end of this year.

The process is complicated. It requires installing transponders every 500 feet on the tracks, along with radios and zone controllers, and buying new trains or upgrading them with onboard computers, radios and speed sensors. The authority also had to develop a design and software that was tailored to New York’s subway.

Over the years, the authority has kept pushing back the timeline for replacing signals. In 1997, officials said that every line would be computerized by this year. By 2005, they had pushed the deadline to 2045, and now even that target seems unrealistic.

Upgrading the signals is expensive, but an even bigger challenge is scheduling work on such a vast system where ridership is always high, even on weekends, Mr. Prendergast said.

“The money issue, as difficult as it is, is an easier issue to sort than how much work can the system sustain at one given period of time,” he said.

As ridership exploded on the L line, which runs between Brooklyn and downtown Manhattan, the agency did not have enough train cars built to communicate with the new signals.

“It took way too long, but it was a confluence of things that made it take a while,” said Richard Barone, a vice president at the Regional Plan Association, an urban policy group that has studied New York’s signals.

The authority awarded a contract for the No. 7 line work in 2010, but Hurricane Sandy struck two years later, damaging subway tracks and delaying the project. And officials have been reluctant to frustrate riders by halting train service for long stretches, leaving workers with few windows to finish the work, Mr. Barone said.

Then there is the constant uncertainty over the authority’s finances. State and city leaders feuded over the agency’s current capital plan for a year, and the agency still does not know how Mr. Cuomo will finance much of the $8 billion he committed toward the pared-down $29.5 billion five-year plan. Transit advocates say that having a stable funding source would benefit signal work and other long-term projects.

A More Modern Tube

Then there is London. A close look at how it is attacking the same problems could provide something of a blueprint for New York.

As its population climbs, London is facing similar concerns about subway overcrowding. The London Underground, known as the Tube, opened in 1863 and is the oldest subway system in the world. It now carries about five million people each day, its highest ridership ever. The crowding at rush hour is so intense that officials sometimes must close certain stations.

The rollout of modern signals on four lines has significantly reduced delays, making travel across this huge city of nearly nine million people more efficient. This month, the Victoria line will reach a peak of 36 trains per hour — compared with 27 trains per hour a decade ago, and among the highest rates in Europe. In New York, the Lexington Avenue line, the nation’s most crowded subway route, runs a peak of 29 trains per hour.

On the Victoria line, which already has some signal upgrades, riders enjoy reliable service and a constant flow of trains.

“I’ve never been stuck waiting for a train,” Joe Brooke, a 20-year-old student, said as he rode the line on a recent afternoon. “It’s convenient, easy, quick.”

London has moved more quickly on signals because officials completed the work on each line faster as they gained experience, prioritized funding for the project and were willing to face commuter wrath when closing stations. The projects have required disruptive weekend closings and a major overhaul of the system’s infrastructure.

“People think it’s just a few computers — how could it be so expensive?” Mark Wild, the managing director of the London Underground, said in an interview at his office. “It’s new trains, new track, new power. The signals are a relatively small piece of the capital cost, but it’s the bit that unlocks it.”

The project to modernize the next four lines is expected to cost roughly 5.5 billion pounds, or about $7 billion, and increase capacity on those lines by a third. Funding in London is generally less challenging because the system relies on higher fares than New York and on a capital grant from the national government. But scheduling work is also easier because the subway has not traditionally run round-the-clock, as New York’s system has. The Tube only recently introduced overnight service on some routes.

Over the years, officials learned from each line and settled on standard technology, Mr. Wild said. The Northern line modernization was completed in about three years — a shorter period than on other lines.

“The key thing to get across is: The duration to do these jobs gets shorter and shorter the more you do it,” Mr. Wild said.

Tube riders applaud the results. Maes Al-Gabry, 25, who recently moved to London from New York, said she often found herself waiting — and waiting — on subway platforms in New York. On the Tube, a train arrives every minute or two.

“It’s so much more reliable,” she said as she rode the Victoria line on a recent afternoon.

London is also working to ease overcrowding by building a new line and buying roomier subway trains, with accordion-style connectors between cars. A new route called the Elizabeth line will open in London next year, with plans for 10 new stations and 26 miles of new tunnels. The plan, known as Crossrail, is the largest infrastructure project in Europe, costing about £15 billion, or more than $19 billion.

But Transport for London, the agency that runs the Tube, has faced obstacles, too. In 2013, it canceled a contract with Bombardier, a transportation company, over concerns that it could not complete signal work on four older lines on time, and started over with a different company.

The agency lost time and money, but officials learned from the mistake, said Stephen Joseph, executive director of Campaign for Better Transport, an advocacy group.

“There’s a feeling Transport for London knows how to do this now,” Mr. Joseph said.

The Path Ahead

In New York, subway officials are working to replace track and cable equipment on the lines with the oldest infrastructure and to move the No. 7 train to a modern signal system. Signals on the Queens Boulevard line will be upgraded next.

But in Queens, regular weekend closings on the No. 7 line have set off an uproar. Some people have moved rather than endure unending disruptions, said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, a Democrat who represents western Queens.

“We have people who are just at their wits’ end,” Mr. Van Bramer said. “They’re incredibly frustrated and incredibly angry, and there is no end in sight.”

Mr. Barone, of the Regional Plan Association, argues that New York should schedule longer closings to finish the work more quickly. Mr. Van Bramer agreed that it would be better to simply “rip the Band-Aid” off by doing all the work at once.

Wynton Habersham, head of the subway department at the transportation authority, said he would prefer longer closings, too, but the agency has to weigh the impact on riders.

“The reality is, if we had our druthers, we’d probably shut an entire line down to do a signal project,” he said. “But to do that brings a lot of inconvenience and brings a lot of pain to our customers.”

On a recent evening, Mr. Habersham walked along the train tracks near 34th Street in Manhattan as workers replaced antiquated switches and cables. A signal system should last about 50 years, he said, but the one that guides trains through this slice of Manhattan has been in place for about 80.

“We’re at a point now where it’s getting difficult to maintain the system,” he said. “We’re maintaining it and it’s safe, but it’s 30 years beyond its useful life.”
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Old May 2nd, 2017, 12:10 AM   #4319
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Does anyone know exactly how many trains per hour run on the Lexington Avenue Line during peak? The article suggests 29 trains per hour but by my calculations, and based on the fact that there are four tracks in the trunk line, that number is significantly higher.

The 4 train runs on 4m30s headways, 5 train runs on 5m0s headways, and 6 train runs on 2m30s headways, which by math means the system runs at 49 trains per hour, which is a lot of capacity but still less than the 2 x 36tph theoretical maximum on the Victoria Line.
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Old May 2nd, 2017, 12:36 AM   #4320
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The 4 train runs on 4m30s headways, 5 train runs on 5m0s headways, and 6 train runs on 2m30s headways

So lets do the maths.

60/2.5 = 24tph on the slow tracks (6)
60/4.5 = 13.33tph on the (4)
60/5 = 12tph on the (5) for 25.33tph on the express tracks.

The E+F on the QB Express, and the 7, run at 30tph.
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