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Old October 21st, 2007, 09:45 PM   #421
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Thank you, that was fascinating to watch. Funny how booze's always been wrapped into anything, everything. The whole el looked haunted even in its day.
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 10:13 AM   #422
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It's a little weird isn't it, especially for north-south stations, since the street number exits are marked so it's quite obvious the lowered-numbered exit would be south.
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 01:23 PM   #423
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I remember seeing remnants of the El still being used by the subway in the Upper West Side ... probably further north of that near the GW Bridge.
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Old October 22nd, 2007, 02:48 PM   #424
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It's a little weird isn't it, especially for north-south stations, since the street number exits are marked so it's quite obvious the lowered-numbered exit would be south.
The same applies to east west stations in manhattan sMaller numbered avenues means east whereas large ones west
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Old October 23rd, 2007, 07:29 PM   #425
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Man found dead on subway tracks on Lower East Side of Manhattan
23 October 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - A man has been found dead on the subway tracks of a Manhattan train station, his feet touching the electrified third rail.

Police say they were called early Tuesday morning by track maintenance workers who spotted an unconscious man lying on the ground at the Delancey Street/Essex Street station of the "J" train.

Officers then found the 50-year-old man lying on the tracks. He was pronounced dead an hour later. The medical examiner will determine the cause of death.
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Old October 24th, 2007, 05:30 AM   #426
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It's a little weird isn't it, especially for north-south stations, since the street number exits are marked so it's quite obvious the lowered-numbered exit would be south.
Even as a native of New York City, it's still very disorienting, mainly because there's usually only one point of exit and the signs aren't very clear.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 01:31 AM   #427
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Wow, and this coming from grid-orientated dwellers? Too funny. Maybe those signify some kind of commuter who forget the sun's traveling the sky left to right up where they live....looking upward must be a pain in the neck there.

Be thankful for, e.g., their mass of one-way streets there. I'm sure that docket could be spent better.
I wish people would stop using unnecessary made-up words like "orientated". "Disoriented" people get "oriented", not "orientated".
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Old November 1st, 2007, 04:43 AM   #428
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Related :

Report: NYC easing off film-permit plan that caused outcry
28 October 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - The city is softening proposed rules for photography in public places after an earlier plan was blasted as an unfair burden on amateur and independent shooters, a newspaper reported Sunday.

The new proposal would generally let filmmakers and photographers with hand-held equipment shoot at will in parks and on sidewalks if they didn't create too much of an obstruction, The New York Times reported. The plan is set to be released for public comment Tuesday, according to the newspaper.

The earlier plan would have required a permit and a $1 million insurance policy for any filming or photography that involved two or more people at a given location for half an hour or more, and for five or more people using a tripod for more than 10 minutes.

City film officials said they were trying to help directors and producers get safe access to prized locations without inconveniencing New Yorkers. But critics said the proposal could ensnare nature photographers, fashion and wedding shooters, and amateurs making videos to post online.

The Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting agreed to revise the proposal in August, before it took effect.

Under the new plan, the permit and insurance requirements would not apply to productions that stayed out of traffic and left open at least half or eight feet of a public walkway, whichever was greater. They could use tripods, but they would be required to get permits if they used vehicles or such equipment as lights or cables, according to the Times. Filmmakers who could not afford the insurance could ask officials to waive that requirement.

"We want people to have access to the streets and parks and buildings in New York City and to be creative here," said film office Commissioner Katherine Oliver. "We think we've come up with something that is quite workable right now."

So do some critics of the earlier proposal. New York Civil Liberties Union lawyer Christopher Dunn, who had said the organization was prepared to go to court to block the initial plan, said the proposed new rules "assure that virtually all photographers and filmmakers will be free from permit and insurance requirements."

Professional crews have long been required to get permits and insurance to block off streets and sidewalks.

The proposed rules stem from an NYCLU lawsuit involving an independent filmmaker who was detained for using a handheld video camera in midtown Manhattan in 2005. The NYCLU argued in part that the city had never properly enacted film-permit regulations. The case was settled, and the film office agreed to formalize its rules.
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Old November 1st, 2007, 06:26 AM   #429
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Old November 1st, 2007, 10:05 AM   #430
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that's the most retarded proposal i've ever heard....to prevent terrorism? that's a bit extreme.

you don't need photos of the station, just do some surveying and then one day, hop on a train with a suitcase bomb and blow up the vehicle....god forbid it ever happening.
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Old November 1st, 2007, 12:05 PM   #431
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In NYC and around the country, subways not kind to the disabled
31 October 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - For handicapped New Yorkers, a trip aboard the city's subway system leads to a series of rude shocks every day.

First, they need to be at a station that actually has an elevator that takes them below ground to the subway station. Many elevators break down and aren't always fixed quickly. Some are rickety, others reek of foul odor.

And when disabled riders finally get to the train, they experience several terrifying moments as they try to cross the gap between the platform and subway car -- or when their wheels must squeeze just inches from the platform edge.

As subway rider and advocate Michael Harris puts it, navigating the subways by wheelchair "takes a certain kind of emotional stamina. It's physically and emotionally draining."

Only about 60 of the 486 city's stations are accessible to wheelchairs, and about 40 more are under construction toward that aim, said James Anyansi, a spokesman for New York City Transit.

"We're more than 100 years old, and we're trying to retro-fit stations with elevators and ramps. Space constraints are a big factor," Anyansi said, acknowledging that Harris is probably right in describing New York's system as the worst in the country in terms of handicap-accessibility.

But it is a problem that disabled Americans encounter around the country, and transit agencies have ended up in court as a result.

A lawsuit prompted the transit authority in Chicago to make several improvements, including installing devices that make it easier for wheelchair users to get on and off trains.

Riders filed a lawsuit in Boston five years ago over broken elevators and inaccessible stations for trains and buses run by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. The agency settled the lawsuit in April 2006, and agreed to spend more than $300 million to upgrade the system.

That includes more than $100 million to upgrade elevators and escalators, along with big changes to the bus system to make it more friendly to the disabled. Bill Henning, director of the Boston Center for Independent Living, said the settlement will lead to big improvements for riders, but added that it will take several years for real changes to get noticed.

"It's not something that happens overnight but they're moving ahead diligently," he said. "What you're really talking about is a system that now is dedicated to improvements and trying to change the culture of an entity that hadn't given this the highest priority or quite understood how to be handicap accessible."

Harris, 23, recently demonstrated the pitfalls of an underground ride by wheelchair.

He left his lower Manhattan office near City Hall, heading uptown to Herald Square at West 34th Street -- a trip that normally takes about 10 minutes on one subway line from the station across the street. But the station is not wheelchair-accessible.

So Harris powered up his motorized wheelchair and rolled to a different station. At that station, he caught an uptown train to Grand Central Terminal. From there, he rolled down the sidewalk to another station and boarded a train for his destination.

It took him about 40 minutes instead of 10.

When there are problems with access, Anyansi said, transit officials post information on station signs, and on the NYC Transit Web site, and they update a hot line four times a day. And there are transit employees available.

In addition, a van can be reserved ahead of time to pick up a passenger at a specified address -- at $2 a shared ride.

But Harris says that there are times, especially during the night, when a person in a wheelchair who runs into a snag -- a broken elevator, for instance -- has no one to turn to for advice.

Harris and a dozen volunteers run an advocacy group he started called the Disabled Riders Coalition. It offers intricate maps of the system on its Web site, with both personal and online suggestions on how to move around.

He and another volunteer have set up an 800 number they answer around the clock, and it's hooked up to their cell phones and pagers. He has studied maps, charts, diagrams and blueprints of every station, and he's tested the rides himself.

"I know the system pretty much like the back of my hand," says Harris, who suffers from a neurological disorder that causes constant, painful muscle spasms.

NYC Transit President Howard Roberts Jr. has joined Harris on several subway rides during which they examined what's wrong and how to fix it.

"Under the new leadership, they are starting to pay attention," says Harris. "For years, we were ignored, and now we are finally getting the attention we should have gotten many years back."
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Old November 1st, 2007, 11:48 PM   #432
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London has no ban, but the thing is certain ill-informed members of staff seem to think there is one and tell you not to take photos, it'll probably be the same for NY.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 12:48 AM   #433
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London has no ban, but the thing is certain ill-informed members of staff seem to think there is one and tell you not to take photos, it'll probably be the same for NY.
Flash photogrpahy is forbidden on the Tube. It's specifically because of numpty tourists taking flash photos of trains as they enter platforms, which blinds the drivers (I can vouch for this).

Quite how banning photography prevents people blowing themselves up I'll never know though... It's very difficult to take photos of some buildings in Central London for this 'reason': I was told off for taking a photo of Tower42 and many ssc members have been hassled by police / security etc. How the hell is a photo going to help a terror attack? So they know which building to fly the plane into?
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 01:34 AM   #434
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Flash photogrpahy is forbidden on the Tube. It's specifically because of numpty tourists taking flash photos of trains as they enter platforms, which blinds the drivers (I can vouch for this).

Quite how banning photography prevents people blowing themselves up I'll never know though... It's very difficult to take photos of some buildings in Central London for this 'reason': I was told off for taking a photo of Tower42 and many ssc members have been hassled by police / security etc. How the hell is a photo going to help a terror attack? So they know which building to fly the plane into?
Not so much flying planes, more "oh look, the trash man leaves this door open during his pick up. Might be a good place to put a bomb...click" Which of course is why this rule is pretty stupid because so what if some terrorist takes a picture of the site they're scouting. They can still scope the place out without a camera.

I can definately understand the "no flash photography" rule tho.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 02:33 AM   #435
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Really? I took quite a few pictures in the Tube when I was in London this past summer. Didn't really see any problems and it looked socially accepted.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 02:37 AM   #436
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Flash photogrpahy is forbidden on the Tube. It's specifically because of numpty tourists taking flash photos of trains as they enter platforms, which blinds the drivers (I can vouch for this).
I know this. But you can still get told off for taking photos without flash, i've had the experience!
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 02:31 AM   #437
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the underground stations are so hot and humid at night during the summer months
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 11:50 AM   #438
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In NYC and around the country, subways not kind to the disabled
31 October 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - For handicapped New Yorkers, a trip aboard the city's subway system leads to a series of rude shocks every day.

First, they need to be at a station that actually has an elevator that takes them below ground to the subway station. Many elevators break down and aren't always fixed quickly. Some are rickety, others reek of foul odor.

And when disabled riders finally get to the train, they experience several terrifying moments as they try to cross the gap between the platform and subway car -- or when their wheels must squeeze just inches from the platform edge.

As subway rider and advocate Michael Harris puts it, navigating the subways by wheelchair "takes a certain kind of emotional stamina. It's physically and emotionally draining."

Only about 60 of the 486 city's stations are accessible to wheelchairs, and about 40 more are under construction toward that aim, said James Anyansi, a spokesman for New York City Transit.

"We're more than 100 years old, and we're trying to retro-fit stations with elevators and ramps. Space constraints are a big factor," Anyansi said, acknowledging that Harris is probably right in describing New York's system as the worst in the country in terms of handicap-accessibility.

But it is a problem that disabled Americans encounter around the country, and transit agencies have ended up in court as a result.

A lawsuit prompted the transit authority in Chicago to make several improvements, including installing devices that make it easier for wheelchair users to get on and off trains.

Riders filed a lawsuit in Boston five years ago over broken elevators and inaccessible stations for trains and buses run by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. The agency settled the lawsuit in April 2006, and agreed to spend more than $300 million to upgrade the system.

That includes more than $100 million to upgrade elevators and escalators, along with big changes to the bus system to make it more friendly to the disabled. Bill Henning, director of the Boston Center for Independent Living, said the settlement will lead to big improvements for riders, but added that it will take several years for real changes to get noticed.

"It's not something that happens overnight but they're moving ahead diligently," he said. "What you're really talking about is a system that now is dedicated to improvements and trying to change the culture of an entity that hadn't given this the highest priority or quite understood how to be handicap accessible."

Harris, 23, recently demonstrated the pitfalls of an underground ride by wheelchair.

He left his lower Manhattan office near City Hall, heading uptown to Herald Square at West 34th Street -- a trip that normally takes about 10 minutes on one subway line from the station across the street. But the station is not wheelchair-accessible.

So Harris powered up his motorized wheelchair and rolled to a different station. At that station, he caught an uptown train to Grand Central Terminal. From there, he rolled down the sidewalk to another station and boarded a train for his destination.

It took him about 40 minutes instead of 10.

When there are problems with access, Anyansi said, transit officials post information on station signs, and on the NYC Transit Web site, and they update a hot line four times a day. And there are transit employees available.

In addition, a van can be reserved ahead of time to pick up a passenger at a specified address -- at $2 a shared ride.

But Harris says that there are times, especially during the night, when a person in a wheelchair who runs into a snag -- a broken elevator, for instance -- has no one to turn to for advice.

Harris and a dozen volunteers run an advocacy group he started called the Disabled Riders Coalition. It offers intricate maps of the system on its Web site, with both personal and online suggestions on how to move around.

He and another volunteer have set up an 800 number they answer around the clock, and it's hooked up to their cell phones and pagers. He has studied maps, charts, diagrams and blueprints of every station, and he's tested the rides himself.

"I know the system pretty much like the back of my hand," says Harris, who suffers from a neurological disorder that causes constant, painful muscle spasms.

NYC Transit President Howard Roberts Jr. has joined Harris on several subway rides during which they examined what's wrong and how to fix it.

"Under the new leadership, they are starting to pay attention," says Harris. "For years, we were ignored, and now we are finally getting the attention we should have gotten many years back."
Seriously, this is a load of BS. If you're disabled, here's an idea: get a taxi or take a bus. The subway was built in 1904, there's no possible way to fix it. The platforms are built on curves, not flat, not straight, on hills, there's no room on street level or on the platform for fixes, the entrances themseles are narrow and cramped, how do you think that you could ever make it more accessible. The ADA really pisses me of when they talk about it being the MTA's fault when the MTA didn't exist at the time of construction. Why does the ADA pay for all of this if they're so concerned?
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Old November 3rd, 2007, 04:34 PM   #439
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That's a very valid point. It's very difficult to engineer something from a hundred years ago to fit today's changed values. I don't think there is a legal case against the MTA if they can demonstrate they've made the analysis and decided it's not feasible to make the whole subway system disabled-friendly.
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Old November 4th, 2007, 11:20 PM   #440
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They do have a program called "Access-A-Ride", from the MTA.
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