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Old November 13th, 2007, 02:07 PM   #461
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Second Avenue Subway project : http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=114525
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Old November 13th, 2007, 02:28 PM   #462
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Don't Rush to a Fare Hike
13 November 2007
The New York Times

Since the summer, New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority has been trying earnestly to make its case for increasing fares. The needs of the system are overwhelming and, even though the M.T.A. is looking at a $1 billion surplus, substantial deficits are projected starting in 2009. The authority's chief executive, Lee Sander, has no choice but to find a way to fill the hole.

That said, the M.T.A. is wrong to try to solve its problems primarily on the backs of financially burdened riders. It should first demand help from the state and city, which have shortchanged mass transit for years.

As part of its long-term budget, the authority wants to raise the base price of a bus or subway ride every two years. And because -- incredibly -- the MetroCard machines in subway stations cannot make change for a quarter, the authority says the minimum increase has to be 25 cents. The first increase, which could take effect in March if the M.T.A. board approves it, would raise the $2 fare to $2.25. An alternate plan would raise fares for peak hours and lower them off-peak.

While no one denies that the system needs financial help, the timing of the fare proposal is off. The next state budget is expected to be prepared by next April, and that is when the M.T.A. should work to extract more aid from Gov. Eliot Spitzer and the Legislature. Dozens of lawmakers -- urged on by Assemblyman Richard Brodsky of Westchester -- have pledged to fight for additional money. The M.T.A. should be encouraging them, and pushing Mr. Spitzer to do his part.

The rush to a fare increase could also help to subvert Mayor Michael Bloomberg's congestion pricing plan, which Albany must act on by the end of March. If congestion pricing -- which calls for a fee to drive into parts of Manhattan -- is approved, it should generate a considerable amount of money for mass transit.

The M.T.A. is dealing with real money problems, including rising pension and labor costs, service upgrades and major projects like the Second Avenue subway line. But New York riders already pay too high a share of the system's costs, more than in other major cities.
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Old November 13th, 2007, 06:30 PM   #463
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vancouverite View Post
Surely the 2nd Ave Subway stations will have elevators. I don't see any in the station entrance renders.
Whats that vertical box behind the entrance? That might be an elevator.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Is it going to be built via the cut-and-cover method or by TBMs?
63rd-96th street will be constructed using TBMs. Right now the utilities are being shifted and the TBM will arrive around May-June next year.
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Old November 13th, 2007, 11:35 PM   #464
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Originally Posted by indiansunite View Post
^
The best map I could find of the 2nd Ave line on the existing system-

]
I'm wondering why the line at the northernmost point veers off to the left... Correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't that green line overcrowded? Surely extending the "T" line to connect with one of it's branches would relieve overcrowding and get rid of the bottleneck?
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Old November 13th, 2007, 11:47 PM   #465
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Nice entrance structures!
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Old November 14th, 2007, 03:42 AM   #466
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I like all the station entrances except the one set into the building. Why does the glass have to jut out like that? It makes the building at street level look silly. (Top right just in case anyone isn't clear)

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Old November 14th, 2007, 04:45 AM   #467
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After 45 Years, New York's Subway Chief Has Reached His Stop
13 October 2007
The New York Times

When he retires next month, Michael A. Lombardi will have spent 45 years working in the subway, rising from a $2.43-an-hour job as a machinist's helper to the top job in the system, as the senior vice president for subways at New York City Transit.

He did a lot of things during those four and a half decades, but his most important contribution, in the eyes of many of his peers, is the role he played in wrenching the subway system out of the abyss that it had fallen into in the 1970s and early 1980s.

''We went through this terrible, terrible period where nothing worked,'' said Mr. Lombardi, 63, a broad-shouldered man with a ready laugh and a silvery pompadour. ''Nothing worked. The trains didn't work, the doors didn't work. They were always smoking, they were always on fire, they were always late. It was incredible. It was the worst subway in the world.''

The solution that Mr. Lombardi championed seems like an obvious one today, but at the time it was revolutionary. Why not, he said, replace the key components of subway cars before they break down?

The idea had originated in the 1960s with a mechanical engineer named Doug Tilton, who was, Mr. Lombardi said, ''our local in-house genius on subway cars.''

Mr. Tilton had cataloged dozens of subway car parts and calculated their useful life. But at the time there was neither the will nor the way for a complete rethinking of how subway cars were maintained. There was money, now and again, to buy new cars, but not for upkeep.

''We just bought new cars and let them disintegrate,'' Mr. Lombardi said. ''Imagine that.''

In 1970, Mr. Lombardi was an instructor, training electricians and mechanics in subway car repair. He was in his late 20s and already he was something of a rising star. Mr. Tilton saw a kindred spirit.

''He said to me, take this program,'' Mr. Lombardi recalled, ''put it in your desk drawer. You may make it to the top.''

Mr. Lombardi said that in those days most managers at the transit agency were not interested in new ideas from their employees. But Mr. Lombardi saw his chance in the late 1970s when he was assigned to work with an engineering consultant hired to tackle the problem of subway breakdowns. ''He had an attache case,'' Mr. Lombardi said. ''He was an outsider. They were going to listen to him.''

Together they promoted Mr. Tilton's idea and won the support of high-level transit officials. Mr. Lombardi said the city put up some seed money to get the program started. Then, in 1981, the state authorized a multibillion-dollar plan to improve the condition of the city's transit system, and the program received another boost. Today it is known as the Scheduled Maintenance System and has been extended to the bus fleet and copied by other transit agencies. Combined with the purchase of thousands of new subway cars, the impact has been remarkable.

In 1979, Mr. Lombardi said, subway cars broke down, on average, every 4,800 miles traveled. Today, they average a breakdown every 149,000 miles.

''It was the worst system on earth, and we're the leaders of the pack now,'' Mr. Lombardi said.

Howard H. Roberts Jr., the president of New York City Transit, called the maintenance program Mr. Lombardi helped create ''maybe the greatest transit achievement of which I know.''

''What most people do is, they do what they've been taught,'' Mr. Roberts said. ''For Mike and a couple of his colleagues to literally transcend the established wisdom and hit upon the idea of starting to replace major components before they have caused mechanical problems, that really, from my point of view, makes his career extraordinary.''

There seem to be few aspects of the subway system that Mr. Lombardi has not touched. He helped develop a special kind of paint for subway cars that made it easier to wash off graffiti. He spurred changes in the way subway cars are designed. And he helped manage the evacuation of subway riders during blackouts and after the World Trade Center attack on Sept. 11, 2001.

Mr. Lombardi was born in 1943 and grew up in East New York, Brooklyn. His father, John, worked in the subways for 31 years, starting as a conductor and eventually becoming a tower operator. His father retired in 1972. That was 10 years after Mr. Lombardi, at the age of 18, got his first subway job.

In 2002, Mr. Lombardi was promoted to his current job, which gives him responsibility for the entire subway system.

Two of Mr. Lombardi's children now work for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority as well. Mr. Lombardi is known for his wit (''I'm a wisecracker,'' he said), and when talking of his children's careers, he jokes that he believes in keeping nepotism in the family.

His son Gregory, 46, has worked in the subway system for 27 years and is now the general superintendent of the Coney Island overhaul shop, a job Mr. Lombardi held in the mid-1980s. ''He's sitting in my old seat,'' Mr. Lombardi said. (''He's also stolen my joke book,'' he said.) His daughter Laurie, 36, is an assistant budget director for the transportation authority's capital construction corporation. Another daughter, Tracey, 33, is a nurse in a coronary care unit at a hospital in Southern California.

Mr. Lombardi said he was retiring, in part, to spend more time with his wife, Alicia. For most of his career he has been on call 24 hours a day, and there were many times when the phone rang in the middle of the night. All these years, he said, the phone has been on his wife's side of the bed, so she has been awakened countless times.

Sitting in his office at New York City Transit headquarters on lower Broadway, Mr. Lombardi projects an enthusiasm that brings to mind the teenager thrilled to get his first job in the subway and the youthful manager searching for ways to fix a broken system. He recounted a conversation with a younger colleague who was unhappy with his job and was looking forward to an early retirement. It was an attitude that Mr. Lombardi could not understand.

''I'm saying to myself, I'll swap with you today,'' he said. ''I'll do it all over again.''
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Old November 14th, 2007, 05:49 AM   #468
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
I'm wondering why the line at the northernmost point veers off to the left... Correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't that green line overcrowded? Surely extending the "T" line to connect with one of it's branches would relieve overcrowding and get rid of the bottleneck?
Don't ask me..ask MTA about the reason for the merger with the green line.

Plus construction from 96th to 125th streets will only start in 2014. By then MTA will realize that it would be better and wiser to go straight up to the Bronx where it'll be all good in da hood.

Connecting to one of the green branches wouldn't be a nice idea as it would then serve only 1 of the 3 northern green routes. MTA thinks that it'll be better to terminate the line where commuters will get more options of choosing a line to reach their destination.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall
I like all the station entrances except the one set into the building. Why does the glass have to jut out like that? It makes the building at street level look silly. (Top right just in case anyone isn't clear)
The glass jutting out is probably to give the subway line the oomph factor
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Old November 14th, 2007, 06:17 AM   #469
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here are more renders. Albeit a little too small, they still give a idea of what's in store for NY










Different phases of construction of the Second Ave Line -

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Old November 14th, 2007, 07:04 AM   #470
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Don't ask me..ask MTA about the reason for the merger with the green line.

Plus construction from 96th to 125th streets will only start in 2014. By then MTA will realize that it would be better and wiser to go straight up to the Bronx where it'll be all good in da hood.

Connecting to one of the green branches wouldn't be a nice idea as it would then serve only 1 of the 3 northern green routes. MTA thinks that it'll be better to terminate the line where commuters will get more options of choosing a line to reach their destination.
If you look at the map, the 125 Av. station will connect with all three of the Lexington Av. (green-4/5/6) lines. I'm guessing at this point they'd try and bleed some of the traffic from the Bronx who are headed further down to Manhattan. Running the Q/T line into the Bronx would incur the cost of crossing the Harlem River either by bridge or tunnel.



In the far long term, would it be possible to extend the T further to South Ferry or along Wall/Rector St. to Battery Park. That'd tie into the Rector Connector that the MTA's been touting, plus it'd give a cross-town route downtown (not that it's really needed as it's a lot narrower than Midtown).
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Old November 14th, 2007, 07:06 AM   #471
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
I'm wondering why the line at the northernmost point veers off to the left... Correct me if i'm wrong, but isn't that green line overcrowded? Surely extending the "T" line to connect with one of it's branches would relieve overcrowding and get rid of the bottleneck?
You can't really see it there, but that's about where it would cross the Harlem River, crossing into the Bronx. I don't think there's a need for another Bronx line right now, but I'm sure expansion infrastructure will be placed at the end before the curve.
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Old November 15th, 2007, 01:05 AM   #472
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Quote:
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I like all the station entrances except the one set into the building. Why does the glass have to jut out like that? It makes the building at street level look silly. (Top right just in case anyone isn't clear)

I like it. Looks funny and makes it easily recognizable as a subway entrance instead of camouflageing it.
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Old November 15th, 2007, 02:09 AM   #473
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Nice! I like how some of them blend into storefronts. It is always cool to have standalone enterances, too. Makes the street seem more lively.
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Old November 16th, 2007, 12:02 AM   #474
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Sunken NYC subway cars could rest with fishes off resort

OCEAN CITY -- If enough funds are raised, the Ocean City Reef Foundation may drop 40 or more old New York City subway cars off the coast of Ocean City by summer 2008 to create artificial reefs.

"Ten years ago we were approached by the city of New York about subway cars," said Greg Hall of the Reef Foundation. "At the time, we were going to be the first ones."

But Hall said the idea was turned down because of environmental and longevity concerns.

"We also had questions about the possible mobility during a storm and we declined them," he said. "Since then, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia have taken the subway cars and studies are showing they're doing better than we thought."

He said all environmental concerns had been addressed, and the Environmental Protection Agency has found the subway cars to be suitable artificial reefs. The cars in current supply are newer and of a different make.

"The original cars were smaller and lighter and there has not been any mobility issues with them," said Marty Gary, a fisheries biologist with the Department of Natural Resources.

The new cars are stainless steel, while the old were carbon steel.

"Carbon steel had the estimated longevity of about 25 years, and the stainless steel cars have a minimum of 40 years," Gary said.

After the estimated life, it is predicted the cars will turn to rubble, leaving the aquatic habitat around it in tact.

"The marine life will affix to anything hard, and steel is a pretty good attachment point," he said. "The same thing happens to the vessels that have been deployed, but the nice thing about subway cars is that they are like a mini housing unit. Fish and divers can easily move in and out of the cars."

Gary said other states are jumping at the chance to get these cars.

"We have put in a reserve but we are not sure how many we are going to be able to afford," he said.

The mayor and council voted to support the idea, but no funding will be required from the town.

"Because of this big reef initiative with multiple user groups, we've been able to all work together, and in less than a year, raise over $1 million," he said. "The prices have been in flux and until we lock in an agreement, we won't know for sure, but the cars will be anywhere from $400 to about $700 per car, which is still a pretty good deal."

Gary said the town of Ocean City currently holds permits for the reefs.

"If we go forward with an agreement, the town will have to be the signatory on the agreement contingent on having the right deployment plan," he said.

Gary hopes to have a new agreement drawn up within the next few days and said summer 2008 would be the best time to drop the cars.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 12:55 PM   #475
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Good news for the Second Avenue Line - it officially has federal funding! See this New York Times article.

Also, a few small things to respond to previous posters: yes, the Q (and eventually the T) will intersect with the Lexington Avenue Line (the 4, 5, and 6) at 125th St. and Lexington Ave. It doesn't just jog left because it can. As others have mentioned, the Lex Ave. Line (please don't call it the green line - despite the fact that it is colored green on the map, New Yorkers never call it this) is currently at maximum capacity, and the MTA hopes that the Second Ave. Line will be an alternate route down the east side of Manhattan.

I have two questions, though. First, once the T is finished, are there any plans to change the Q into an express between 125th and 72nd? It seems like the 4/5 (the express lines on Lexington Ave) will be much faster than the Q/T, so it'll be hard to persuade people coming from the Bronx to transfer. Also, the placing of the southernmost stops seems kind of strange; why not enable transfers to other lines, so that, say, you can continue on into Brooklyn? I suppose you can get the F, B, or D further north, but still. Maybe this would make more sense with a map of Lower Manhattan in front of me, but I'm curious if anyone has a ready answer.

Lastly, both "orient" and "orientate" are valid words (with the same meaning). "Orient" is more common and is older, dating from the 700s; however, "orientate" is hardly new, with usage traced back to the 1840s. If you need to pick one, "orient" is probably better, since (IMO) it sounds nicer and is more widespread; however, "orientate" is also correct.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 08:59 PM   #476
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the Lex Ave line has been built a long time ago compared to the 2nd Ave Subway which is being constructed with modern machinery

The Lex Ave line was probably built using cut and cover but i think with the 2nd ave Subway it will be built using Tunnel Boring machines to make the streets easier for everybody

but this is an expection to the already built portions of the line which are built with the cut and cover method
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Old November 19th, 2007, 10:23 PM   #477
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U.S. Approves $1.3 Billion for 2nd Avenue Subway

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: November 19, 2007
nytimes.com

The long-dreamed-of Second Avenue subway will take another important step toward becoming a real thing of concrete and steel today, as the federal government plans to announce that it has formally approved $1.3 billion in financing for the project’s first phase.

Transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters said in an interview that the money would be paid out over the next seven years as construction progresses on the subway’s first leg, which will have stops on Second Avenue at 92nd, 86th and 72nd Streets and at 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority began preliminary work on the line after Gov. Eliot Spitzer held a ceremonial groundbreaking in April.

Ms. Peters said the federal money would pay for about one-third of the work on the first phase, which is expected to cost more than $4 billion. The first leg is scheduled to open in 2014, and it will run as an extension of the Q line.

“It will be very good news to people in the area that this long-planned, on-again-off-again project will finally be completed,” Ms. Peters said.

She said the financing for the Second Avenue subway would be the second-largest federal expenditure ever on a single mass transit project. The largest is for construction of a Long Island Rail Road link to Grand Central Terminal, which is also under way. The federal government has pledged $2.6 billion to that project.

Most of the additional money for both the subway line and the commuter rail project will be raised by the sale of bonds.

Plans for the Second Avenue subway call for the line to eventually stretch from Harlem to the financial district. It is to be built in four phases, but there is no schedule for the other three sections of the line. Ms. Peters said the transportation authority would have to apply to her agency for financing of the subsequent phases.

Contractors for the transportation authority have begun to cut a hole in Second Avenue south of 96th Street, where a massive tunnel-boring machine will be assembled.

The Second Avenue subway has been a dream of mayors, straphangers and urban planners since at least the 1920s. In the 1970s, a few isolated sections of tunnel were built, then covered over and abandoned when the city ran out of money.

The transportation authority has said that it is confident it will be able to complete the first phase of the subway.

It has been grappling, however, with rapidly rising costs on its large construction projects. On the subway project, the authority has had to add to its budget for acquiring the real estate needed to allow construction to $245 million, a $54 million increase. And it agreed to a tunnel-drilling contract for $337 million, which was $17 million more than it had budgeted.
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Old November 19th, 2007, 10:59 PM   #478
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This is great!
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Old November 20th, 2007, 02:09 AM   #479
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IMO, they should extend the 'T' [Second Ave.] to Whitehall St, this way people can transfer for Brooklyn service.
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Old November 20th, 2007, 02:50 AM   #480
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Cross Bronx Rail Transport?

I've noticed how Queens and Brooklyn's lines mostly go East-West but still have that one line, the G and N respectively that crosses those lines so people won't have to go into Manhattan just to get across the borough. But the Bronx on the other hand, has no cross Bronx subway and in order to get from Grand Concourse to Riverdale by train, one needs to take the D down to Manhattan and take the A up to 168th street for the 1 assuming one doesn't want to deal with buses (which can take just as long because of red lights and passenger exiting/boarding time).

Does the MTA have any plans to build a cross-Bronx subway, light rail, monorail, etc.?
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