daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 29th, 2007, 12:35 AM   #501
Alargule
Res Uder et Siger
 
Alargule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 8,202
Likes (Received): 2079

Wow. The difference with the standard, tiled, prewar stations is huge.
__________________
Nu op Wordpress: Rails in Amsterdam
Alargule no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 30th, 2007, 03:31 AM   #502
sfgadv02
Registered User
 
sfgadv02's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: NY/HK
Posts: 755
Likes (Received): 44

Very nice, glad to see they are finally catching on to European design.
__________________
// Oh the IRONY!11! \\

mrsmartman liked this post
sfgadv02 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2007, 10:26 AM   #503
ADCS
Kickin' it
 
ADCS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Screwston, Plexus
Posts: 508
Likes (Received): 37

Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02 View Post
Very nice, glad to see they are finally catching on to European design.
I don't think it's "European", just modern. There haven't been too many huge capital projects to expand heavy-rail systems in the US in decades.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
ADCS no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2007, 03:10 AM   #504
geoking66
Registered User
 
geoking66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: London, New York
Posts: 3,253
Likes (Received): 7267

I'm loving the design, but the curved roof just looks stupid (I hear that there will be platform screen doors, if so I completely agree with their use). I still think that the Washington Metro has the best design of any American subway system.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
geoking66 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2007, 10:41 PM   #505
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,665
Likes (Received): 1261

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vancouverite View Post
I think it is completely valid to request a fully accessible transit system. However there has to be an understanding that it will take decades to achieve and cost many, many times more than most people would expect. The NYC subway system, and I would imagine virtually all other systems built until the 1970s or even 1980s, were simply not designed to accommodate wheelchairs. That isn't a pejorative statement, but simply fact. The same is true for the lack of climate control and fire suppression infrastructure in most of these old stations.

In Canada both Montreal and Toronto's old subway stations are wholly wheelchair inaccessible while Vancouver's entire transit system will be fully wheelchair accessible by early 2008. We've spent hundreds upon hundreds of millions of dollars, if not in excess of a billion, renovating stations and purchasing an entirely new fleet of wheelchair accessible buses, including a cool quarter billion in the last couple years to buy a new fleet of electric trolley buses.

The first line of our rapid transit system was built in the early 1980s and even then all of the stations but one were designed to be fully wheelchair accessible. This last one was upgraded to be so in the last year or two. Having a quadriplegic mayor in a wheelchair certainly helps ensure everybody adheres to our accessibility laws. The result is that we are about to have one of the only fully accessible transit systems in the world.

However our transit system is comparatively small by world-city standards and because of its age we exist in an entirely different paradigm than the New York, London, and Paris of the world. We were still nothing but an untouched coastal rain forest when the first trains began running in the London Underground and we were only building our first streetcar lines and finishing the trans-continental railway when New York's subways and el trains were already long established icons.

The ADA and OSHA guidelines are making the world demonstrably better for disabled and handicapped people. If lawsuits help change the culture and built environment then so be it. Challenging the law and pressing for adherence is how most things change. I applaud NYC for having a forty-station upgrade program underway. That's more stations than are in our entire rapid transit system in Vancouver for the time being (16 more in two years!).

Give it time and keep working on it. I am certain it is appreciated by those with special mobility needs, the elderly, mothers with strollers, and people with luggage. In fact accessibility should be viewed as offering ease of access for everybody while walking the social compact to ensure nobody is excluded.
I'm in medical school right now, and I'm actually going into a field that deals with disability.

What's interesting is that up until the 1970's, most people with spinal cord injuries only lived a few weeks. They died of kidney infections and pulmonary emboli. These days, people with spinal cord injuries (even quadriplegics) are expected to live decades after their injuries. Actually spinal cord injury patients are only a small fraction of those in wheel chairs. My guess is that the lion's share are debilitated due to arthritis, obesity, or strokes.

So it's only in recent years in America that there's been an explosion in the segment of the population that is dependent on wheelchairs.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2007, 12:36 AM   #506
iampuking
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,414
Likes (Received): 43

Is there any reason why it appears that NY is going for island platforms instead of the standard side platforms?
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
iampuking no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2007, 04:43 AM   #507
koolkid
Registered User
 
koolkid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 2,327
Likes (Received): 133

Does it matter? It's not as if we don't have island platforms now.

Well, island platforms are much more conveniant for people on wheelchairs(and for everyone else)...
__________________
My New York by Krzycho

mrsmartman liked this post
koolkid no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2007, 05:54 AM   #508
iampuking
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,414
Likes (Received): 43

Quote:
Originally Posted by koolkid View Post
Does it matter?
Maybe not to you, but to me it obviously does since I asked the question. This is, not surprisingly, a section to discuss such issues. No need to be such an obnoxious ****.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
iampuking no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 2nd, 2007, 06:19 AM   #509
koolkid
Registered User
 
koolkid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 2,327
Likes (Received): 133

Ouch. Where'd that come from? I didn't think I was being obnoxious at all...
__________________
My New York by Krzycho

mrsmartman liked this post
koolkid no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2007, 08:14 AM   #510
ramvid01
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 749
Likes (Received): 68

Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Is there any reason why it appears that NY is going for island platforms instead of the standard side platforms?
Monetary/space efficency. There are no express lines on this line so there is no need for 2 platforms. One platform will undoubtly save them space and probably money.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
ramvid01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2007, 12:20 PM   #511
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,867
Likes (Received): 18136

Subway train from 1930s runs on New York tracks for a day
2 December 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - Take the V train -- back to 1937.

New York City Transit put a vintage 1930s-'40s subway train into service for one day on Sunday as a holiday treat for riders.

Called the Nostalgia Train, the subway train features wicker seats, ceiling fans and advertisements from when it was first put in service.

The train's cars are usually kept at the New York Transit Museum in Brooklyn. They were retired in the 1970s.

The train was scheduled to run between Queens Plaza and Second Avenue from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

mrsmartman liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 3rd, 2007, 06:56 PM   #512
iampuking
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,414
Likes (Received): 43

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramvid01 View Post
Monetary/space efficency. There are no express lines on this line so there is no need for 2 platforms. One platform will undoubtly save them space and probably money.
Thanks!
iampuking no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 4th, 2007, 01:35 AM   #513
sfgadv02
Registered User
 
sfgadv02's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: NY/HK
Posts: 755
Likes (Received): 44

Quote:
Originally Posted by ramvid01 View Post
Monetary/space efficency. There are no express lines on this line so there is no need for 2 platforms. One platform will undoubtly save them space and probably money.
Yes, it does save them money. Instead of building 2 elevators on each side, they could just build 1 on the island platform.
__________________
// Oh the IRONY!11! \\

mrsmartman liked this post
sfgadv02 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 4th, 2007, 04:32 AM   #514
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,867
Likes (Received): 18136

Report: Subway safety workers may be cut; MTA says unneeded
1 December 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - Subway workers assigned to guide straphangers to safety in emergencies might disappear next year.

The Daily News reports that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's proposed 2008 budget would cut the workers, saving about $6.5 million. There are about 100 of the safety workers, assigned to 20 key stations. They were added after the London subway bombings in 2005.

MTA officials say changes to subway exit doors have made those jobs unnecessary. New York City Transit spokesman Charles Seaton points to "panic bars" on subway station exit doors, which passengers can push open themselves. Token booth clerks used to have to open the gates.

But City Councilman Peter Vallone says the safety workers are still needed.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

mrsmartman liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2007, 08:00 AM   #515
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,867
Likes (Received): 18136

NY City to start Times Square-West Side subway link

NEW YORK, Dec 3 (Reuters) - Digging will begin in about a year on a tunnel to extend New York's No. 7 subway line from Times Square to an expanded Javits Convention Center and Hudson Rail Yards, spurring development of the city's far West Side, elected officials said on Monday.

Unveiling a sign for the project, city and state officials told a news conference the new link would ensure the city's future as a world business capital but acknowledged that major issues have to be resolved.

These include whether one or two stations will be built in the 1.5-mile-long tunnel and whether the city or state will pay for any cost overruns.

"This is transformative for the West Side," Democratic Gov. Eliot Spitzer governor said of the extension, adding it would open a "barren" stretch of land to development.

Though the line will serve an expanded Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, its main purpose is to drive development for the Hudson Rail Yards just to its south.

Spitzer said waiting for all the details to be finalized would result in "gridlock" but he, Metropolitan Transportation Authority Chief Executive Elliot Sander and Deputy Mayor Daniel Doctoroff said outstanding issues would be resolved in partnership.

The state mass transit agency that builds and runs the city's subways usually pays at least part of the cost of improvements but this time the city is paying for the $2.1 billion tunnel.

The extension is one of the biggest mass transit projects in decades for the nation's biggest mass transit system, with nearly 8 million riders. In April, the MTA also began building a long-awaited Second Avenue subway for Manhattan's East Side.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Monday said the city had a lot of catching up to do, as elected officials had failed since World War Two to build enough transportation to keep the city growing.

"I don't think they left us with as much mass transit as we will need," Bloomberg said.

The new link will extend the No. 7 line west from midtown Manhattan's Times Square to 11th Avenue and then south to 34th Street.

The MTA last week unveiled five competing developers' plans for building over its west midtown rail yards.

The site, which lies between 10th and 12 Avenues and runs north from West 30th to 33rd Streets, will get 24 million square feet of offices, 13,500 apartments and new parks.

Bloomberg, a former Republican who's now an independent, said the city was analyzing the MTA's plan to increase subway fares. He added that the city faces a tough economy and could not give the agency more funding.

The mayor hopes his congestion pricing plan, which would force rush-hour drivers to pay stiff tolls for entering Manhattan, will help pay for new transportation links.

The MTA board on Dec. 19 will vote on a plan to raise discounted fares 4 percent but hold one-trip fares at $2. (Reporting by Joan Gralla; Editing by Frank McGurty and James Dalgleish)
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

mrsmartman liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2007, 06:59 AM   #516
krull
In Time
 
krull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New York City
Posts: 3,072
Likes (Received): 58

Management of Subways to Be Split


By WILLIAM NEUMAN
December 6, 2007

Since the subways were unified into one system decades ago, New Yorkers have come to think of them as part of a single, vast, often unwieldy whole.

When the trains are late or trash piles up in a station, straphangers tend to grumble about a faceless “authority.” No one says: That guy who runs the No. 7 line really needs to get his act together.

But transit officials are determined to change that.

Howard H. Roberts Jr., president of New York City Transit, will announce an overhaul today of how the subway system is run. The changes are designed to give individual subway lines a greater degree of autonomy by putting each one under the direction of a manager who will be responsible for almost everything that happens on the tracks, in the trains and in the stations.

The goal, Mr. Roberts said, is to have 24 subway lines operating in many ways as 24 self-contained railroads. (The number may vary, depending on how the lines are counted.) They will compete against one another and be rated on service, cleanliness, on-time performance and other measures.

Mr. Roberts said he believed that giving the individual lines more autonomy and their own managers will help the system respond faster and more directly to customers’ complaints or other problems.

“What the customers are going to see is better service,” Mr. Roberts said in an interview yesterday. He called the initiative “an extremely significant part of my plan to improve that service.” The reorganization will begin on Monday with a pilot program on two lines, the No. 7 and the L.

If they show improvement, the reorganization will be extended to the rest of the system. New lines would be added every few months until the entire system is decentralized — which Mr. Roberts said would take about three years.


Mr. Roberts acknowledged the risks in attempting a fundamental shift in an organization that has 27,000 employees and a long-established way of doing things.

The obstacles are numerous, and it is not clear that the reorganization will be the panacea that officials envision. Many problems extend across the system. The lines share miles of track, flooding can disrupt service across multiple lines, and work on the tracks must be coordinated with an eye toward the entire system. In many cases, union rules will make it difficult to isolate personnel decisions to a single line. Signals and train movements will continue to be directed from a master control center.

And a manager running just one line still has sprawling responsibilities. There are 394,000 passenger trips each weekday on the No. 7 line alone, more than the daily total for the entire BART system in the San Francisco area.

Despite the challenges, Elliot G. Sander, the chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, said he expected people will ultimately judge his performance at the authority, in part, by whether the subway reorganization improves service.

“In terms of driving home accountability, and pulling the different elements together in subways, I view this as transformational,” Mr. Sander said.

Under the new system, the line managers will be expected to take their cues from rider report card surveys, begun this year, which highlighted areas of service that needed improvement.

To measure how well the managers are doing, the transit agency will take new surveys of riders on the No. 7 and the L lines after about three months.

Within that time, Mr. Roberts said, he expected riders to see cleaner stations and hear more audible announcements on platforms and trains. Both lines will also be running more trains during peak periods, beginning this month, to ease overcrowding.

But while he said he wants quick results, he was also careful to tamp down expectations. In the recent surveys, riders gave the No. 7 line an overall grade of C-minus, and the L riders gave their line a C. Mr. Roberts said that he would be satisfied at the beginning to see a line improving from a C-minus to a C.

The new managers will be backed up with money and manpower. Additional cleaners will be assigned to stations and trains. And managers will also be able to send out special crews to “blitz” their stations — swarming in and spiffing up everything: peeling paint, rusted fixtures and damaged signs.

The No. 7 and the L lines were chosen because they are isolated within the subway system, on tracks that do not intersect with those of any other line. That makes it easier to evaluate their performance.

Mr. Roberts insisted that the changes are more than superficial. Currently, he said, the people who make decisions are often several bureaucratic layers removed from the problems that riders experience.

A request to fix a leak that causes slippery conditions on a station staircase can languish for months or years, he said. Most changes in train schedules have to be submitted to an executive who oversees the schedules on every line.

Under the new system, the general manager for each line will be able to make most of those decisions, large and small. They will be responsible for the workers who drive the trains, staff the token booths and clean and repair the cars.

“The general managers who take over the 7 and L are going to be running their own railroads,” Mr. Roberts said.

And, he said, he is not worried that the changes would create more bureaucracy.

“Bureaucracy is where it takes a year to get something done,” Mr. Roberts said. “Creating small organizations that can react quickly and solve problems overnight is the antithesis of that.”

Mr. Roberts helped carry out a similar reorganization of the city’s bus system, installing managers for each borough, during a stint at the agency in the 1980s.

The parallel will become more apt as the reorganization progresses. Mr. Roberts said the lines would eventually be grouped into five divisions based on their ability to coordinate operations, such as the Nos. 4, 5 and 6 trains.


Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
krull no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 20th, 2007, 04:33 AM   #517
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,867
Likes (Received): 18136

Monitoring system may ease fixing NYC subway elevator breakdowns
17 December 2007

NEW YORK (AP) - A plan to monitor more than 300 elevators and escalators in New York City's sprawling subway system may enable quicker response times to breakdowns.

The transit agency that manages the city's subway is looking to spend $1.3 million on the plan to connect elevators and escalators to a computerized monitoring system.

The agency currently relies on riders or its employees to let it know of service problems at the 158 passenger elevators and 169 escalators.

The monitoring system has already been tested on 44 elevators.

Disabled Riders Coalition spokesman Michael Harris says the transit agency has long had a problem knowing when elevators are out of service. He says the new plan would be an improvement.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

mrsmartman liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 23rd, 2007, 07:49 AM   #518
IU
->
 
IU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Hanooz Dilli dur ast
Posts: 10,545

Took some pictures of station entrances yesterday (Dec 22):












Brooklyn Bridge Station:
1.


2.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
IU no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 23rd, 2007, 05:52 PM   #519
sarflonlad
Registered User
 
sarflonlad's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: London
Posts: 1,086
Likes (Received): 68

The renders for the 2nd Ave extension don't appear to show platform edges doors. What's the decision behind this?

Surely PEDs are needed to air con a station (unless you're in London of course), reduce suicides/accidents and improve loading/off loading of passengers?
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
sarflonlad no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 23rd, 2007, 06:31 PM   #520
god
Registered User
 
god's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Gdynia
Posts: 791
Likes (Received): 219

indiansunite - You are not supposed to shake your camera when taking photos.
__________________

mrsmartman liked this post
god no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
метро, metro, new york city, subway

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium