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Old March 2nd, 2009, 02:19 AM   #901
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Doesn't NY get relatively few tax dollars at all? Because it is not even a state capital etc.
From what I understand, NYC gets just about ALL the taxes for the state of NY.
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Old March 2nd, 2009, 10:03 AM   #902
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Originally Posted by Grunnen View Post
Doesn't NY get relatively few tax dollars at all? Because it is not even a state capital etc.
Besides, in most states, the capital doesn't really matter all THAT much. Good example is Sacramento, California or Springfield, Illinois or Olympia, Washington. There are much larger metros in those states that will get much more funding.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 03:32 AM   #903
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Besides, in most states, the capital doesn't really matter all THAT much. Good example is Sacramento, California or Springfield, Illinois or Olympia, Washington. There are much larger metros in those states that will get much more funding.
Except they have to put up with backwoods rural politicians who were elected into office on essentially a platform of screwing over the big cities as much as possible.

No, that is not an exaggeration.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 06:17 AM   #904
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Damn unions. The MTA could've saved so much money, money that could be used to improve conditions and service. And the MTA wouldn't have had to let go of all of their conductors: some could be used to drive additional trains, or work as station booth agents, or customer service agents in stations, or in maintenance...
This is not only the union. Few years ago the L train was supposed to be run by only one engineer with no more conductor and the State decided it was not safe enough in case of emergency.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 06:56 PM   #905
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This is not only the union. Few years ago the L train was supposed to be run by only one engineer with no more conductor and the State decided it was not safe enough in case of emergency.
Well, it was the union's lawyers that made the courts decide against the MTA. Frankly, if you look at the other major mass transit systems in the US and the world, most only have the engineer in charge of the train. (Although the case could be made that NYC's trains are generally longer and many platforms are curved. But the second issue could be resolved by simply moving the CCTV screens from the middle of the platform to the front.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 02:07 AM   #906
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herenthere View Post
Well, it was the union's lawyers that made the courts decide against the MTA. Frankly, if you look at the other major mass transit systems in the US and the world, most only have the engineer in charge of the train. (Although the case could be made that NYC's trains are generally longer and many platforms are curved. But the second issue could be resolved by simply moving the CCTV screens from the middle of the platform to the front.
I believe that the front and back of the stations have these monitors already.
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Old March 5th, 2009, 04:01 AM   #907
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I believe that the front and back of the stations have these monitors already.
As far as I know...only the middle of platforms have it.
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Old March 6th, 2009, 12:20 AM   #908
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depends on which stations
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Old March 7th, 2009, 10:25 PM   #909
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Quote:
Originally Posted by herenthere View Post
As far as I know...only the middle of platforms have it.
I'm not sure if you're talking about these monitors:

http://nycsubway.org/perl/show?66382
http://nycsubway.org/perl/show?71717

If so, then they're on all L train platforms.
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Old March 8th, 2009, 09:01 PM   #910
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02 View Post
I'm not sure if you're talking about these monitors:

http://nycsubway.org/perl/show?66382
http://nycsubway.org/perl/show?71717

If so, then they're on all L train platforms.
Huh, I guess I should take the L sometime! But why would the L have it even though it was never slated to get One Person Train Operation (OPTO)?
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Old March 8th, 2009, 09:49 PM   #911
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whoa thats awesome. Jw, you guys, did the South Ferry Station open yet? Thanks
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Old March 8th, 2009, 11:25 PM   #912
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Huh, I guess I should take the L sometime! But why would the L have it even though it was never slated to get One Person Train Operation (OPTO)?
From what I know, the MTA wanted to eliminate the conductor and have the train operator only, so I guess those were for the conductor. However, since there were protests from the union, the MTA were forced to have both the train operator and conductor.
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Old March 8th, 2009, 11:32 PM   #913
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whoa thats awesome. Jw, you guys, did the South Ferry Station open yet? Thanks
Not yet, the plan was to have it open in December 2008, but delays caused it to be pushed back February 2009. However, some errors along the platform caused it to be delayed again. The latest I heard is April. Let's hope so!
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Old March 11th, 2009, 04:08 AM   #914
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Not yet, the plan was to have it open in December 2008, but delays caused it to be pushed back February 2009. However, some errors along the platform caused it to be delayed again. The latest I heard is April. Let's hope so!
thanks!
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Old March 12th, 2009, 03:15 AM   #915
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GREAT NEWS!

The new South Ferry Station will open next Monday! 3/16/09
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Old March 12th, 2009, 04:07 AM   #916
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MTA Deal Approaches
New York City may finally be getting the deal for which it’s been pleading for years


Streetsblog reports that New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority may be getting at least part of the deal described by the Ravitch Commission I discussed last December. The plan would implement tolls for cars “at the price of a single ride MetroCard” (currently $2) on the currently free East and Harlem River bridges, including the Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Williamsburg spans. Trucks are likely to be charged a lot more.

This agreement represents the end of Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s manic attempts beginning two years ago to prevent the implementation of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s congestion charge plan, which would have enforced a fee for cars entering, leaving, or moving about the lower half of Manhattan. This plan will transfer ownership of the bridges from the New York City Department of the Transportation to the MTA, which already controls several of the city’s tunnels and bridges the George Washington Bridge. It will (at least partially) rescue the MTA, which is facing a huge $1.2 billion budget deficit in the next fiscal year. The charges on the bridges will bring in something in the realm of $400 million a year.

The deal is also likely to significantly reduce truck traffic in Lower Manhattan and increase ridership on the subways. Though I’m a bit perplexed that people riding mass transit should have to pay the same amount to get across a bridge as people driving in cars, it’s better than nothing. That said, the MTA still needs more money to get through this fiscal crisis.

The New York State Assembly, which has been notoriously anti-toll in the past, will have to approve this plan before it can take effect…

http://thetransportpolitic.com/2009/...-in-peninsula/
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Old March 12th, 2009, 11:53 PM   #917
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MTA Deal Approaches
New York City may finally be getting the deal for which it’s been pleading for years

This agreement represents the end of Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s manic attempts beginning two years ago to prevent the implementation of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s congestion charge plan, which would have enforced a fee for cars entering, leaving, or moving about the lower half of Manhattan. This plan will transfer ownership of the bridges from the New York City Department of the Transportation to the MTA, which already controls several of the city’s tunnels and bridges the George Washington Bridge. It will (at least partially) rescue the MTA, which is facing a huge $1.2 billion budget deficit in the next fiscal year. The charges on the bridges will bring in something in the realm of $400 million a year.

http://thetransportpolitic.com/2009/...-in-peninsula/
Funny how Silver was the one who opposed congestion pricing and prevented it from ever being brought to a vote in the state senate, but now it's "his proposal" that's going to save the day for the $2 toll. Yeah right.
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Old March 15th, 2009, 12:44 AM   #918
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Fourth Transportation Mega Project in New York City Soon to Enter Construction Phase



12 March 2009
from The Transport Politic blog by Yonah Freemark
thetransportpolitic.com

New Jersey Transit and the Port Authority soon to begin construction on Access to the Region’s Core

Days like this make you step back and realize just how far we’ve come. On Friday, New Jersey Transit and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will begin advertising bids for the first construction contracts for the Access to Region’s Core project. This rail tunnel will be the fourth major transit expansion project currently under construction in New York City, after the Long Island Railroad’s East Side Access project, the Second Avenue Subway’s first phase, and the extension of the 7 subway line.

The $8.7 billion project, to open for service in 2017, will provide new tracks for commuter trains under the Hudson River between New Jersey and New York City and create a huge new 6-track station under 34th Street in Midtown Manhattan (pictured above). The first construction will occur in North Bergen, though tunneling will follow soon after in Manhattan. New Jersey assigned $130 million of its transit stimulus funds towards the project. Both NJ Transit and the Port Authority have been generous in their distribution of funds to the project so far, though it still needs financial assurance from the federal government - likely to come this year - to complete the program.

I have a number of concerns about the project, many of which I addressed a few months ago here. As currently designed, the project will make it difficult to expand the tunnels to the East Side of Manhattan; the new station will be far too deep in the ground, making commutes inconvenient; and Amtrak will not be able to use the tracks for through service because there won’t be a connection to the existing Penn Station.

But those qualms aside, the fact remains that we haven’t seen investment in transit like this - together, the projects total more than $20 billion - since the 1930s. We’re virtually doubling commuter rail capacity into Manhattan, we’re taking dramatic steps to relieve the overcrowded Lexington Avenue lines, and we’re opening up a whole new area for central business district development. New York is being provided the vital arteries that will ensure its continued health in the 21st century.

In the early 1990s, it would have been difficult to imagine such a large investment in Gotham’s transport infrastructure, especially after the repeated failures in getting these projects started back in the 1970s.

It is ironic, then, that these investments are being implemented now, just after the conclusion of the truly transit-hostile Bush Administration. We can thank the renewed interest in urban life than began fifteen years ago, New York’s dramatic comeback, and the resilience of the metropolitan area’s politicians in the face of policy that would have otherwise kept these projects in the fantasy bin.

It also tells us that we need to work harder during the Obama Administration to make sure than a transit-friendly government maintains and increases the support Washington has provided for public transportation in recent years. This applies to New York, of course, but also to all of the nation’s metropolitan areas, each of which need and should expect money for better transit.

With these projects underway, it’s time to get started on the next batch. I’m thinking Second Avenue Subway phases II, III, and IV, Metro-North West Side Access, Moynihan Station, Triborough RX, and maybe even an Atlantic Avenue subway.

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Old March 15th, 2009, 02:45 PM   #919
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Why does the new tunnel make that strange curve? Couldn't it be aligned parallel to the existing tunnel?
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Old March 16th, 2009, 11:17 PM   #920
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South Ferry Opens

New Subway Station Opens Downtown
NY1 News, Monday March 16, 2009

Starting today, the Number 1 train will come to a stop at a brand new station, as the long-awaited $530 million South Ferry station opens in Lower Manhattan.
Governor David Paterson and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Executive Director Elliot "Lee" Sanders were among the many officials on hand for the official ribbon-cutting ceremony this morning.
The new station, which became fully operational at noon, does not force passengers to be in one of the first five cars to exit the train. All 10 cars now open at the station.
"By Rector Street, there's normally a mad dash to get to those five cars or to figure out whether you're in one of them," said the governor. "And then, eventually, when the train finally reaches South Ferry, some people get off, some people get stranded. At 12 o'clock today, we will retire this unfortunate tradition here in New York State."
There is also be more than one entrance, more than one track, and a free underground transfer to the R, W train at Whitehall Street.
"What we're giving riders today is a portal into the 21st century and transportation fairness," said Congressman Michael McMahon.
The elimination of sharp curves means trains will be able to run faster – speeding up commutes.
"We will see a dramatic improvement in operation," said MTA Capital Construction President Michael Horodniceanu. "We expect to move passengers faster, better and more efficiently."
The station – the first new one in 20 years – is also fully accessible to handicapped passengers.
Another perk for riders, the platforms will be cooled during the summer months.
Straphangers say they cannot wait to start using the new station.
"This used to be the greatest deal in the city, the Staten Island ferry, now they're opening the subway station," said one subway rider. "You can't beat that."
"On the weekends, I visit friends and family and so I use the 1 train a lot to go on Broadway, so I'm excited," said another.
The project was completed two years late and $130 million over budget. Plans to open the station in January had to be pushed back after inspectors found the gap between the cars and platform was too wide.
"The station is on a curve. That resulted in a gap in excess of three inches," explained Horodniceanu. "They were addressed, and cheaper than we thought. We did it with a lot of labor in house."
Horodniceanu said any previous problems with water leaks have also been dealt with.

http://www.ny1.com/content/top_stori...n/Default.aspx

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Why does the new tunnel make that strange curve? Couldn't it be aligned parallel to the existing tunnel?
Probably b/c of existing infrastructure nearby, but yeah it does suck how they can't build a straight platform.

>>>Shortly afterwards...<<<
Subway service resumes after water main break
Eyewitness News, Monday March 16, 2009

NEW YORK (WABC) -- No. 1 subway service south of 14th Street has resumed after getting knocked out by a water main break.
The service suspension meant trains were unable to get to the new South Ferry subway station on its first day of service.
The main broke around 1:00 p.m. at intersection of Canal and Varick streets in TriBeCa, flooding the Canal Street station.
Because of the water condition, South Ferry-bound No. 1 trains were turning at the 14th Street station.
The break also caused problems for riders of the 2, 3, 4 and 5 trains.

Trains resumed their normal routes shortly before 4:00 p.m.
http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?se...fic&id=6712318
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