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Old November 20th, 2009, 06:46 AM   #1081
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it supposed to be 11 before it was 8 cars on the C trains
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Old January 27th, 2010, 05:31 PM   #1082
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New York transport authority wasteful, inefficient-chief

NEW YORK, Jan 15 (Reuters) - New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority wastes 15 cents of every one dollar collected in fares and has been eclipsed by its peers in cities from London to Bogota, its new chairman said on Friday.

Chairman Jay Walder, reporting on his first 100 days in the job, said too little had changed since 1983, when he began his career at the biggest U.S. mass transit agency whose graffiti-scarred subway cars used to symbolize "urban decay."

Walder said: "Buses still crawl in city traffic. Information is still hard to find or understand. Toll plazas still back up. And how the MTA does business has not substantially changed since it was formed in 1968."

The MTA is the umbrella agency for the bridge and tunnel, commuter line and subway and bus authorities.

The recession dented New York City's Wall Street-driven economy and a separate report said the MTA's revenues fell $100 million in the first 10 months of last year as employers cut 110,000 jobs.

The MTA, which carries 9 million riders a day, will soon hold hearings on drastic service cuts it says are needed to close a $400 million deficit. And there is a risk subway, bus and commuter fares and tolls on tunnels and bridges will have to be raised this year.

Despite the weak economy, Walder vowed to forge ahead with upgrades. "We must utilize partnerships -- both with the private and public sectors -- to test new technology and services," he said.

Making his case for streamlining the MTA's bureaucracy, Walder said the 5,000 administrative staffers cost $500 million a year. Riders have 92 telephone numbers to call for information, and new technology has often become obsolete by the time it is installed, he said.

There are three agencies that repair rail cars and "internal handling" eats up 18 cents of every dollar spent on inventory. Yet "Cost cutting without a clear plan has led to too many managers overseeing too few employees," Walder said.

He called on unionized workers to identify cost savings by modernizing work rules, and said overtime, which costs $500 million a year, can be pruned with better management.

With 2.5 million daily bus riders now "held hostage to crawling city traffic," Walder said new camera surveillance and "on the spot ticketing" of drivers who block bus lanes will speed trips on six key corridors.

Later this year, 75 subway stations will get electronic signs announcing arrivals and routes.

About 25 percent of the drivers still pay tolls in cash, though this costs more than electronic passes. The MTA will work with a financial firm on a prepayment system for them.

Maintaining subway stations, which sometimes are dirty, have leaky roofs or missing tile, should have the same priority as keeping equipment in good repair, Walder said.
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Old January 28th, 2010, 05:03 AM   #1083
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UES Residents Sue MTA Over 2nd Avenue Subway

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Since it was proposed in 1929, the long-awaited Second Avenue subway line has been knocked off track by two financial crashes and one world war. Now, the massive transit project is facing another formidable adversary: residents of an Upper East Side co-op who have filed suit over the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's controversial plan to construct above-ground ventilation structures, which some say will blight the neighborhood and lower property values.

According to the Real Deal, residents of the co-op at 223 East 69th Street, where eight households would have their east-facing windows completely blocked by the ventilation structure, accuse the MTA of unlawfully altering the designs of the cooling towers. The suit claims the agency's 2004 Final Environmental Impact Statement promised that the ventilation structures "would typically be approximately the same size as a typical row house—25 feet wide, 75 feet deep, and four- to five-stories high, although some may be wider," and that they "could be designed to appear like a neighborhood row house in height, scale, materials and colors." But now the MTA is planning on building structures as tall as 10 stories with facades made from a "utilitarian mix of translucent white glass, steel louvers and ceramic tile."

"[I]f the MTA insists on moving forward with this design change, then it must conduct an additional public environmental review, including a full analysis of the facility's impacts on the buildings at 233 East 69th Street, and an evaluation of suitable mitigation measures or alternatives to avoid or minimize the facility's impacts to the greatest extent practicable," said attorney Michael D. Zarin, who estimated such a review could delay the project by an additional six months to one year. The MTA has said it must construct the above-ground structures, some of which require the use of eminent domain, because the sidewalk grates that ventilate most subway stations are no longer up to code.
This is how the utility structure will look like on 96th street and 2nd Ave-


source
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Old January 28th, 2010, 12:01 PM   #1084
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I can see why very it can be such an arduous task to build public transport infrastructure in the US. Litigation is only ever a heartbeat away.

Any old excuse to sue and grab some money you don't deserve will do...
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Old January 28th, 2010, 08:05 PM   #1085
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^This country has more lawyers than it knows what to do with.
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Old January 30th, 2010, 01:52 AM   #1086
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
New York transport authority wasteful, inefficient-chief

NEW YORK, Jan 15 (Reuters) - New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority wastes 15 cents of every one dollar collected in fares and has been eclipsed by its peers in cities from London to Bogota, its new chairman said on Friday.

Chairman Jay Walder, reporting on his first 100 days in the job, said too little had changed since 1983, when he began his career at the biggest U.S. mass transit agency whose graffiti-scarred subway cars used to symbolize "urban decay."
New MTA Chief Announces Major Overhaul Plans

By SHELLEY NG
NEW YORK (WPIX) - Jay Walder, the new chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, has marked his first 100 days in office by releasing a 24-page report outlining his plans for a major system overhaul on Friday.

"We will do what every business in the state has had to do to survive," said Walder in his report. "We will examine every aspect of our operation to discover better and less expensive ways to do essential work."

Walder said MTA has not changed the way it conducts business since its inception in 1968 and there are several overdue cost-cutting improvements for the agency.

One of his goals is to eliminate redundancies within the system. For example, Walder says the MTA has "92 different telephone numbers customers can call for information."

The MTA has about 5,000 administrative positions, many of doing the same job, that costs the system $500 million per year. He plans on eliminating duplicate jobs and departments and reducing the number of people in management.

Overtime accounts for an additional $500 million of the MTA's budget and Walder plans on revamping employees' expensive and restrictive work rules.

He also said some transit agencies could share facilities, like having the Metro-North Railroad and Long Island Railroad share repair yards. Along with his plans for streamlining the MTA, he also outlined several new initiatives he intends on implementing.

In the next few months, Walder said electronic signs indicating the amount of time for the next train or bus will be installed in subway stations and bus stops.

The MTA is also partnering with MasterCard to experiment with a new fare-collection system, which would eliminate the need to swipe a MetroCard in order to board mass transit.

Another goal is to help buses move faster by improving signage, using on-the-spot ticketing and placing cameras along six congested route throughout the five boroughs.

He also wants to reinstate a regular painting and repairs program, which would include the upkeep of escalators and elevators even if they are not broken and improving the aesthetics of stations so they do not appear "dirty and in a state of disrepair."

http://www.wpix.com/news/wpix-mta-ov...,1554618.story

Quote:
Originally Posted by IndiansUnite View Post
UES Residents Sue MTA Over 2nd Avenue Subway



This is how the utility structure will look like on 96th street and 2nd Ave-


source
It looks pretty good for me, although some people have pointed out that it would look better with some ground floor retail space. The basis of the community's allegation is that the MTA claimed that the final design would include a structure 'about 4-5 stories high,' but the current proposed is over that.
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Old January 30th, 2010, 03:52 PM   #1087
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I know, that this is a threat about subway in NYC. Still I want to ask some of well informed what is happening with 996-998 New Flyer's D45H?
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Old January 31st, 2010, 11:11 PM   #1088
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MTA Unveils More Train Arrival Signs

I especially like the first one, which lets riders know which direction the correct platform is!
http://twitpic.com/10dr8q
http://twitpic.com/10dpal

Subscribe to the MTA's twitter feed here: http://twitter.com/statuses/user_timeline/94129050.rss
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Old February 1st, 2010, 12:15 AM   #1089
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mixin' it up

In regards to the vent shafts for the 2nd Av. Subway, it just appears to be a case of NIMBY. But, who will use this line when it's done? And who will complain if it isn't done? And who will benefit from it's completion. As a Bronx born ex- New Yorker, I know that New Yorkers have a right to complain. They should use all the negative energy to do something rather than whine. It seems like they are trying to cash in. This kind of things goes on world-wide. I think they should either put up or shut up. That line would have been there for over 70 years and this would not be a factor today.


As for the look of the R-160's. I love the cool blue seats and lighting of the interiors of these cars. The exterior is just plain, and plain awful. many other systems around the globe have bright and/or classy looky exterior colors. I gues NYC is just cutting costs and has no desire to be aesthetic about their rolling stock. Stainless steel can be made to look awesome with color. These block heads don't get it! If Chicago can "paint the mother pink", what is the problem with the Big (RED) Apple?
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 08:51 PM   #1090
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Proposed merger with M line

In late 2009, the MTA discovered that it was confronting a financial crisis; many of the same service cuts threatened just months earlier during a previous budget crisis were revisited, including the ending of rush-hour M service. In response to extreme public outcry to the cuts, which included the ending of the Student MetroCard program, the MTA chose to review its proposals in an attempt to minimize the impact on riders. One of the newest proposals being seriously considered involves the complete phasing out of M service; the V would then serve as the route's replacement. Using the Chrystie Street Connection, a severed track connection between the BMT Nassau Street Line and the IND Sixth Avenue Line, the V would no longer serve its current terminus, Second Avenue. Instead, the V would leave Broadway - Lafayette Street and serve the current M line stations from Essex Street in Manhattan to Metropolitan Avenue in Queens.

The MTA has determined that this move, while still a service cut, would actually benefit M riders; approximately 17,000 weekday riders use the M to reach its stations in Lower Manhattan, whereas 22,000 weekday riders transfer from the M to other lines to reach destinations in Midtown Manhattan.[5] This proposal would also benefit J/Z riders in that with the merger of the M and the V, Z service would be retained; previously, the Z was proposed for removal as part of the service cuts, ending skip-stop service along the BMT Jamaica Line and turning the J fully local. Finally, this merger would open up new travel options for northern Brooklyn and Queens J/Z and M riders in that it would allow direct and more convenient access to areas that are not currently served by those routes, such as Midtown Manhattan.

This service change would also give the V train the title of being the only subway route to service the same borough twice.
Source

This surely would be interesting if this really were to happen: the M is one of the oldest services around and hasn't really seen any drastic changes in the past.
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Old February 20th, 2010, 05:55 AM   #1091
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Push Begins for 2nd Stop on No. 7 Subway Extension

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More than two years ago, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the city concluded that there was enough money for only one new station on the extension of the No. 7 line, at 34th Street and 11th Avenue.

Plans for a second station, at 10th Avenue and 41st Street, were shelved. But now that the tunnel boring machines have chewed through 10 blocks, the real estate industry wants the second station built.


Part of a machine, right, that is digging an extension of the No. 7 subway line. Although city officials effectively killed plans for one of two stops more than two years ago, a fight has resumed.

Fresh off a victorious effort to persuade the federal government to move the Khalid Shaikh Mohammed trial from New York City, the Real Estate Board of New York, the powerful lobbying arm of the industry, has turned its attention to the missing link in the No. 7 line. This week it started a Web site (BuildTheStation.com), a petition drive and a lobbying campaign to press the Obama administration to come up with hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for the station.

“We think it should have two stops,” said Steven Spinola, president of the Real Estate Board. “There is substantial growth already taking place near 10th and 41st. For them to quietly let the station evaporate, without anyone telling anybody, is a mistake.”

The station’s status is not exactly news, however. City and transit authority officials say that the station was eliminated from the plans more than two years ago, and it was not a secret. There were newspaper articles and protests by elected officials, including Senator Charles E. Schumer and Representative Jerrold Nadler. The city and the authority did retain an “option” with its construction contractor to build the second station, but that expired in September 2008.
...
Read on
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 10:54 PM   #1092
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Camera- and flip seat-equipped train debuts on E!

After months of delays and planning, a pair of pilot programs three years in the making are finally coming to fruition along the Queens Boulevard line. A new R160 car set to roll out as an E train will feature four cars equipped with advanced video surveillance equipment and a new car configuration featuring hand poles in new locations and rush-hour flip-up seats. The seats will be locked down for the time being, and Transit does not know when the flip-up feature will be utilized.
For the agency, the announcement that these pilots are live came after years of planning. The MTA first announced plans to install cameras in subway cars as early as March 2007, and in April 2008, Transit said that some R160 at a certain point in the future would play host to the pilot. Last August, Transit again reiterated plans to beef up on-board security, and now, an E train will test run these cameras.
“Video camera systems have clearly been shown to help deter criminal activity on transit vehicles and we believe strongly that they can also be extremely valuable in investigating accident injury claims,” NYC Transit President Thomas F. Prendergast said in a statmeent. “But we must also acknowledge the potential threat of terrorist activity on public transportation vehicles and CCTV has been instrumental in helping with investigations in this area.”
Transit started a one-year evaluation period today and offered a few details behind their plans. Four cars in a ten-car set will be equipped with four cameras each for a total of 16. Each set of four cameras is linked into one DVR system, and the four cameras are tied into a network controller unit that transmits the signals between cars. The cameras are placed to “effectively cover the passenger area,” according to Transit, and while the agency stressed that the cameras are for recording purposes and not live monitoring, it’s unclear how Transit plans to make use of the footage. Each car with a camera in it will feature a decal, seen here at right.
“The CCTV System will be evaluated for its recording quality and car-to-car transmission of video signals within the subway environment,” Steven Feil, Senior Vice President, Department of Subways, said. “Upon successful completion of the testing and evaluation of the system, NYC Transit may consider implementing the CCTV System throughout the subway fleet.”
Meanwhile, while the camera pilot will be live, the MTA’s other long-term plan — flip seats designed to maximize rush hour standing space — will be an option in a new R160 along the E but won’t be activated in the foreseeable future. The history of this plan is nearly as drawn out as that of the CCTV’s. Transit announced a seatless train experiment in early 2008, and while Boston’s MBTA started its own pilot in December 2008, Transit’s plan stalled out when Kawasaki refused to retrofit an R142 for use along the East Side IRT.
The new car, as the photo above shows, will feature flip seats and a better handhold configuration. If Transit decides to flip up the seats for any rush hour, the car’s capacity will increase by 19 percent. However, Transit says that “deployment of this feature is not being considered at this time.” In the meantime, the new pole locations should improve passenger flow and encourage riders to toward the middle of crowded subway cars. Today, with poles close to the doors, those riders who stand tend to block flow and empty space in the middle of cars often goes unused.
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Old February 24th, 2010, 02:42 AM   #1093
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coret View Post
Camera- and flip seat-equipped train debuts on E!

The new car, as the photo above shows, will feature flip seats and a better handhold configuration. If Transit decides to flip up the seats for any rush hour, the car’s capacity will increase by 19 percent. However, Transit says that “deployment of this feature is not being considered at this time.” In the meantime, the new pole locations should improve passenger flow and encourage riders to toward the middle of crowded subway cars. Today, with poles close to the doors, those riders who stand tend to block flow and empty space in the middle of cars often goes unused.
Better handhold configuration? maybe on the top, but those vertical bars look way too far for an average person to grab a hold of when the seats are down.
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Old February 24th, 2010, 12:12 PM   #1094
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Why does it seem like NY's trains will never get articulated cars?
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Old February 25th, 2010, 12:18 AM   #1095
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I think you should address this question to the MTA, because they're doing whatever they want, and nobody knows what's going to happen....
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Old February 26th, 2010, 11:19 AM   #1096
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an interesting article from wired:

Feb. 26, 1870: New York City Blows Subway Opportunity
Quote:


1870: Inventor Alfred Ely Beach opens New York City’s first subway line, a pneumatic demonstration project in a 300-foot tunnel under Broadway.

Beach first demonstrated pneumatic transit at the 1867 American Institute Fair, and sought to build a pneumatic transit system underground to relieve surface-level congestion with a system consisting of, in Beach’s words, merely “a tube, a car, a revolving fan!”

Beach obtained permission in 1868 to build a large package-delivery tunnel under Broadway, but secretly began work on a demonstration passenger-transit system, complete with a luxuriously appointed station and passenger car.

Like the deposit tubes at bank drive-through windows, the car was propelled by a rush of air from a blower, in this case a massive one. “When the blower is in motion, an enormous volume of air is driven through the tunnel, which drives the car before it like a boat before the wind,” Beach wrote in 1870. The blower was built by Roots, whose successor company, Dresser, still builds smaller units for pneumatic tube systems.

After only 58 days of construction, Beach’s subway opened as a demonstration project on Feb. 26, 1870.
Passengers entered the railway through a station in the basement of Devlin’s clothing store and offered as a fare a small donation to a home for orphans of Union soldiers and sailors from the Civil War.

The railway wasn’t actually operational on its opening day, because of an engine failure, but within a week passengers began taking the journey from Broadway to Murray Street and back. The tunnel alone was fascinating to New Yorkers, so daytime hours were reserved for tunnel tours and evening hours for passengers.

Beach envisioned a larger network of underground railway tunnels and gained support from the state legislature in 1871 and 1872. Both measures were vetoed by Gov. John Hoffman, on the grounds that they gave too much power to the Beach Transit Company.

Beach himself publicly contended that infamous Tammany Hall ruler “Boss” Tweed killed the Beach Pneumatic Subway, even though Tweed had first introduced the bill to the state legislature. More to the point, wealthy Broadway landowners favored elevated transit, fearing that underground tunnels would damage the foundations of their buildings.

What ultimately caused Beach’s railway to cease operations in 1873 was the financial panic that led to the Long Depression. After years of rapid postwar economic expansion, a series of financial blows led to bank failures and dried-up credit markets, which would have prevented Beach from expanding his subway, even if the governor had approved it.

The situation is eerily reminiscent of the modern economic crisis and current debates about high-speed rail. Beach himself offered a warning to future railway builders:
Everybody in New York wants rapid transit, but, strange to say, the moment that any body sets to work with a definite plan for its realization, they are vigorously opposed and the work prevented.

Elevated lines eventually gained popularity because of their lower cost. Thus the Interborough Rapid Transit Company didn’t begin underground public transit service until 34 years after Beach’s demonstration line first opened.

Despite its appearance in Ghostbusters II, no elements of Beach’s subway remain. The station was lost to fire in 1898, and the tunnel was destroyed during construction of a Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit tunnel in 1912. Today’s City Hall station occupies the former tunnel’s footprint.
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Old March 6th, 2010, 11:35 PM   #1097
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NY wins $274 mln stimulus funds for transportation
The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded more than $274 million of stimulus funds to help finance two projects in New York, a group of officials said on Friday.
Quote:
The funds will be allocated to the Second Avenue subway project and the East Side Access Project, Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand and Representatives Jerry Nadler and Carolyn Maloney said in a statement.

The Second Ave project aims to ease congestion on the Lexington Avenue line on Manhattan's east side, the busiest subway line in the nation.

The East Side Access project aims to create a rail link from the Long Island Railroad to Grand Central station via the 63rd Street tunnel, cutting commuting time for riders from Long Island.

The Second Ave project will receive $78.9 million, while the East Side Access project will receive $195.4 million.
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Old March 29th, 2010, 02:59 AM   #1098
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Some "not-good" news from Last Wednesday...

Quote:
Transit Agency Approves Cuts, and More Bad News Looms
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Published: March 24, 2010

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority formally approved on Wednesday a slate of severe service cuts that will eliminate two subway lines and dozens of bus routes in the city and create longer, more-crowded trips for the region’s transit riders.

The cuts, which will help close a budget gap of about $400 million, will not go into effect until June, but discussions have already begun about how the board will address an anticipated budget deficit of nearly another $400 million. And there is a growing, if reluctant, consensus that higher fares and tolls will be necessary; the only question is when and by how much.

A 7.5 percent fare increase is scheduled for next year. Agency officials have calculated how much revenue could be gained from various fare and toll structures, according to people familiar with the discussions. The topic has come up in private conversations between Jay H. Walder, the authority’s chairman, and friends and colleagues.

And the question has arisen whether an even bigger increase would be preferable to losing yet more service.

Mr. Walder has repeatedly said that he does not want to raise fares this year, and people familiar with his thinking say that he is determined to keep that pledge.

Asked on Wednesday if next year’s increase might be larger than 7.5 percent, Mr. Walder said only that the authority would consider the specifics of the next increase later this year.

“The first priority right now is on reducing our costs,” he said.

With little possibility of a state bailout, however, the authority’s options are limited.

The cuts approved on Wednesday, which prompted a widespread outcry from riders, will save the authority about $93 million.

The authority has cut administrative costs by 15 percent and laid off hundreds of station agents, and Mr. Walder said on Wednesday that it was renegotiating contracts with its suppliers and trying to drive down labor costs.

The authority still plans to eliminate discounted fares for students, which would save $214 million, but that proposal was not considered by the board on Wednesday, adding to the sense that the worst was yet to come.

The authority’s only path toward generating significant revenue is a fare increase. Longtime transit planners believe that an increase of 10 to 12 percent — which would raise the base fare to about $2.50 — might be necessary to make up the gap. (Several have shared those thoughts with the chairman.)

“There’s definitely going to be a fare increase; now the question is will it be enough?” said Allen Cappelli, a board member. “Probably not.” He said that the board had not yet discussed the prospect of a bigger increase.

With discounts for multiple-ride MetroCards, the average fare paid by a subway rider was $1.47 in January, far less than the $2.25 base fare and 8 cents higher than the average ride in 1996.

“Based on a comparison of New York City to other major urban areas, there’s clearly elasticity in the fares,” said Kathryn S. Wylde, chief executive of the Partnership for New York City, a business group that Mr. Walder meets with regularly. “Fares could go up without losing ridership,” she added.

The 7.5 percent fare increase approved for next year was part of an attempt to create a regular pattern of increases for the New York City system that would roughly follow inflation, similar to a system in London, where Mr. Walder worked previously.

There was a growing sense among officials on Wednesday that straphangers would be facing more pain in coming months.

At a news conference, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg warned New Yorkers to “save your anger” for the authority’s next set of cuts. “This is just the beginning,” the mayor said. “The next round, I would think, would be much worse.”

Under the plan approved on Wednesday, the V and W trains will be eliminated and the M line will no longer run in Lower Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn. Bus riders will lose 34 routes, including 13 express ones. Several other bus lines will be truncated or rerouted.

The Long Island Rail Road will reduce service on several lines, and eliminate overnight service between its Atlantic Avenue terminal and Jamaica. Trains on the Port Washington line will run every hour, instead of every 30 minutes, except during rush hours.

Metro-North Railroad will eliminate a handful of trains.

“The only thing I fear more than the vote I have to cast today,” John Banks, another board member, said on Wednesday, “is the vote I’m going to be asked to cast in the near future.”
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Old March 29th, 2010, 03:15 AM   #1099
ranieri
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New York's Boring rides

I agree that those vertical bars are too far for standees. I also think, although the interiors look bright and clean, that they show no imagination. The exterior designs are that way as well. A very cold, sterile, appliance looking snorefest. I live 120 miles west of the City where I was born. I go to NY several times a year and find an excuse to ride the subway. BTW, articlulated models were tried in the late 1930's (the last attempt) and they were awesome. But, in 1940, when Fiorello LaGaurdia took over as mayor, he did away with anything that wasn't standardized, as the R-1's were across the board. The units that were purchased before his time, were used into the 1950's but were never re-ordered. The Triplexes are represented in the Transit Museum. They are pretty cool and were ahead of their time. I'd share a picture but I have no authorization to show any.
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Old March 30th, 2010, 02:51 AM   #1100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ranieri View Post
I agree that those vertical bars are too far for standees. I also think, although the interiors look bright and clean, that they show no imagination. The exterior designs are that way as well. A very cold, sterile, appliance looking snorefest.

The Triplexes are represented in the Transit Museum. They are pretty cool and were ahead of their time. I'd share a picture but I have no authorization to show any.
Something about US designs just suck. Unless the R160s weren't designed by a US firm, there's just this plain look to them that makes it look, like you said, cold and uninviting. (I've said it before and I'll say it again: R46's are the best) I mean, take a look at the new M8 cars for MNR, the front is just grotesque: http://twitter.com/MTAInsider/statuses/11106408599

Try nycsubway.org?

Does anyone know what this train model is called: it looks like an R46, but the interior ceiling side lights are flush with the ceiling and there is a strip of lighting that runs parallel along the top of the train. Runs on the R.
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