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Old October 13th, 2005, 02:10 AM   #101
greg_christine
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Does anyone understand the proposal to extend New York JFK Airtrain to Manhattan via the Long Island Railroad?

The two systems are totally incompatible. Airtrain is totally automated and features LIM propulsion. The Long Island Railroad trains are not automated and feature conventional rotary electric motors. Either the Long Island Railroad would have to adopt the Airtrain technology, which is very unlikely, or Airtrain would have to regress to being a non-automated conventionally-powered rail system.
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Old October 13th, 2005, 02:24 AM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roch5220
Well, thats because the MTA seems to bleed trains in the off peak hours to ensure full trains. They really need to increase service in the off hours along the 456.
I'd say the problem is really with the 4 and 5, another problem is the transfer's at 59th..man those people on the nrw platform are literally falling off that thing sometimes

but the probs with the 4 and 5 are numerous..I can't say much for the brooklyn portions of those lines, but in the bronx..there is a severe congestion problem between around 183rd and burnside to around 161st, 149th, and 138th, It happens on and off..but it occurs more than it should

part of It has to do with a switching issue for when the trains come in to 125th (ie. 4 trains don't skip 138th on purpose)

another question I want to know is why aren't they're more 5 dyre express trains? or even a permanent dyre express instead of having the 5 run part-time!!!... it would take the load off of packed 2 trains to serve the white plains rd riders, but the 2 takes priority over the 5...unfortunately

another reason for the 4's overcrowding in the bx...is the sub par service on the concourse line...i'll take the 4 over the d any day.....I think in general all of the ind lines..(even though they were originally built to support a large capacity) are in need of an overhaul.
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Old October 13th, 2005, 02:35 AM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Third of a kind
another reason for the 4's overcrowding in the bx...is the sub par service on the concourse line...i'll take the 4 over the d any day.....
depends on where you live. In the morning rush hour, if you live at an express stop, the D is MUCH better than the 4. Living near the beginning of the D, I could be in midtown in about half an hour. during rush hour, it would be along the order of 45 minutes to get into the upper east side.
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Old October 13th, 2005, 11:07 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQui
depends on where you live. In the morning rush hour, if you live at an express stop, the D is MUCH better than the 4. Living near the beginning of the D, I could be in midtown in about half an hour. during rush hour, it would be along the order of 45 minutes to get into the upper east side.
I know what you mean don...I just have a gripe with the intervals on the concourse trains..they come but sometimes I just hate waiting sometimes like 15 min for a train. I agree with you it is good to live by an express station..even if your not at the begenning of the line...say like around fordham or tremont...though I usually catch the d from bedford or kingsbridge....so most of the time I catch the 4..and sometimes i catch the d back.

at night..i'd prefer the d over the 4, I think its a more comfortable ride

I also got a gripe with about that fordham station..those walls in there can annoying...I recently found out that those big ones..that can be confusing on the platform..are like that because a rest area for transit employees is built above...
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Old October 15th, 2005, 10:16 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chavez
I found no threads about it, sorry if I missed, then please point me to.
My question is, if anybody as any knowledge about Air train to be extended ?
Ride on this was a nice experience for me, but I wish it was covering more of NYC and be...cheaper ?

greets
The MTA and PATH (who has jurisdiction over the AirTrains) don't exactly see eye to eye, so we have the somewhat inconvenient link into Manhattan from JFK. When the AirtTrain was being built, locals in Ozone Park wanted a stop put in their neighbourhood, but were denied as it did not serve the airport's immediate needs. The AirTrain in PATH's eyes is simply an extension of the airport (hence the funding source).

The pissing match between the MTA and PATH aside, the logistical problems surrounding security with MTA subways getting free access into JFK would never get past Homeland Security's smell test. Thus, any rail access to LGA (if and when) would look a lot like the AirTrain setups at both JFK and EWR — no direct trains, just a link to a hub to get you to where you need to go.
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Old October 16th, 2005, 01:31 AM   #106
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^ That's PA (Port Authority), not PATH (Port Authority Trans Hudson). PATH is a subway operated by the PA.
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Old October 20th, 2005, 03:25 AM   #107
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NY Subway fares slashed in half for holidays

MTA To Offer Discounted Fares During Holiday Season
October 19, 2005
NY1

The MTA wants to give straphangers an early holiday gift, and while it won't come wrapped in a bow, in may lighten the load during an expensive time of the year.

In a memo, MTA Executive Director Katherine Lapp recommends a holiday promotion that would include half fares on the weekends from Thanksgiving through New Year's and during the entire last week of December for those who use pay-per-ride cards.

"It's nice to be called Santa. I think it's a nice gesture that we can do, and if my board and my funding partners agree, I think that it'll be a nice Christmas for most New Yorkers," said MTA Chairman Peter Kalikow.

The MTA's board still has to approve the holiday gift, but it is expected to pass at the board's meeting next week.

If the proposal is approved, those who use a monthly MetroCard during the holiday season will get four free days, and those who purchase a weekly MetroCard will get one free day.

There would also be a special holiday MetroCard good for unlimited rides from November 23 through New Year's Day – a total of 39 days for the cost of a 30-day MetroCard, $76.

Subway riders seem pleased with the proposal.

“I guess it gets people back in town. Everyone needs to ride the subway anyway. It's a great idea,” said one straphanger.

“It's a fantastic idea. It's about time. It's about time they're helping us out for a change,” said another subway rider.

“Sooner or later they're going to raise the price anyway, so at least we get a little break in the meantime,” added a third.

Rider advocates agree the plan is a fiscally responsible one, and a welcome token of goodwill.

“Ten years ago we were begging the authorities to use the surplus to benefit the riders, and so the fact that the MTA itself is thinking of these kinds of rewards for its long-term customers is a good sign about the agency, and that it wants better service and more security is absolutely critical,” said Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign. "My sense is that this is sincere, it's going to save people money, and it's not going to generate a fare hike."

The discounts, which also extend to express bus riders and Long Island Rail Road and Metro North riders, are possible thanks to a huge budget surplus, the result of low interest rates and higher-than-expected tax revenue generated by a booming real estate market. Altogether, the fare discounts will cost the MTA just $50 million.

A much bigger chunk, $450 million, will go toward a employee pension fund, another $100 million toward security projects, including surveillance cameras, and $50 million toward service improvements like more cleaners.

It's not clear how any of this will affect fare increases planned for 2007.

"We'll think about that as the time goes by,” said Kalikow. “We don't have to face that issue until the summer of 06, and I think we'll deal with it then."

Meanwhile, the MTA may be trying to ease the burden on riders, but there's no mercy for anyone who sells swipes on MetroCards.

Many New Yorkers have been approached by a swiper trying to make a profit off an unlimited MetroCard by selling access through a turnstile.

Starting Wednesday, the offense becomes a class B misdemeanor and one that could land illegal swipers in jail for up to 90 days.

New York City Transit says swipe selling costs the city about $10 million a year in revenue.
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Old October 20th, 2005, 08:37 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asohn
MTA To Offer Discounted Fares During Holiday Season
There would also be a special holiday MetroCard good for unlimited rides from November 23 through New Year's Day – a total of 39 days for the cost of a 30-day MetroCard, $76.

.
thats very good news!...plus the 23rd is also my birthday!!!
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Old October 21st, 2005, 12:07 AM   #109
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Wow, that's great news. Why only 39 days for 30 days paid though, and not 45 like pay-per-riders?
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Old October 28th, 2005, 02:32 PM   #110
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New York Subway Riders Could Get 2nd Holiday Fare Break

NY subway riders could get 2nd holiday fare break
By Joan Gralla

NEW YORK, Oct 25 (Reuters) - New York City's subway riders might get end-of-year holiday fare discounts two years in a row because surging real estate tax collections have helped produce a fat surplus, agency officials said on Tuesday.

The discounts -- which would stretch from Thanksgiving to New Year's -- would, for example, give subway and bus riders 3 extra days if they buy a $76 MetroCard, explained an official with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of the State of New York, who addressed a finance committee meeting.

Not all of the 7 million people who ride New York City's subways and buses every day can afford a $76 electronic fare card, and riders who purchase a 7-day card would get one extra day, the official explained.

Suburban commuters from Long Island and Connecticut would be offered similar fare discounts, as part of a broad effort to unsnarl the city's notorious holiday traffic jams and encourage the use of mass transit.

The MTA, which runs New York City's subway, bus and commuter lines, wants to spend a total of $100 million on these fare discounts in 2005 and 2006.

Estimates for the agency's surplus keep growing: it now is expected to hit $700 million or so, the MTA official said.

In July, that surplus was projected at $481 million, after the agency decided to use $350 million or so of its extra cash to close future budget gaps, according to a staff memo that was released.

Though the MTA board meets on Thursday, it is not required to approve the discounts, explained Tom Kelly, MTA spokesman. They will be discussed, however, and the board does have the power to block them, he added.

The MTA board will not, however, take up other proposals for using the rest of the surplus until mid-November.

Those plans include using the cash for some of the agency's capital program and paying down some of its pension liabilities.
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Old October 29th, 2005, 01:43 AM   #111
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Finally something good from the MTA...
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Old October 29th, 2005, 09:42 PM   #112
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M.T.A. Approves Subway and Bus Fare Discounts



The board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority endorsed the holiday discount plan by a 12-to-2 vote.
Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times


By SEWELL CHAN
Published: October 27, 2005

The board of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority endorsed by a 12-to-2 vote today a plan to give subway and bus fare discounts in New York City during the holiday season.

The decision occurred after an unusually lengthy debate, with several board members arguing that the discounts provided little relief to riders of the authority's two commuter railroads. Representatives of Westchester and Suffolk Counties were the two dissenters.

The board agreed to shelve, at least for three weeks, a suggestion by Gov. George E. Pataki that it devote $250 million from an unexpected surplus to transportation projects in Lower Manhattan. The board will take up the issue of the surplus, which could exceed $1 billion by the end of this year, at its next meeting, on Nov. 16.

Critics argued that the holiday fare discounts, estimated to cost $50 million, might signal to riders that the authority is flush with money, when in fact it faces a ballooning debt burden. The authority still plans to raise fares in 2007 and 2009, and it is imploring voters to support a $2.9 billion transportation bond act that will appear as Proposition 2 on the statewide ballot on Nov. 8.

The authority's chairman, Peter S. Kalikow, appeared to persuade the board with his argument that the discounts were only a small part of his plan for spending the nonrecurring portion of the surplus, estimated at $700 million.

Under the plan, $450 million from the surplus would go to reduce a $2.2 billion pension liability; $150 million would pay for security and service improvements, and $100 million for fare discounts this year and next.

Mr. Kalikow argued that the fare discounts were an important symbol of the authority's gratitude to its riders.

"What we're doing for them is not a big deal," he said. "I'm not trying to tell you that this is a big deal and will make a lot of difference to a lot of people. All this does say is that when this board meets - made up of suburban members, city members, state members, rider members, union members - at least we do think about the riders."

He added: "In a small, and in a somewhat insignificant way, this is the way we're saying, thank you."

The base fare for a ride on the subway, non-express buses and the Staten Island Railway will be reduced by half, to $1, on weekends from Thanksgiving to New Year's Day and during the last week of December.

The authority will add four bonus days to any 30-day MetroCard, and one bus day to any seven-day MetroCard, activated in December. A special holiday MetroCard, valid from Nov. 23 through Jan. 1, will be sold for $76 (the normal price of a 30-day MetroCard), payable only in cash.

Riders of the Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad will receive a free 10-trip off-peak ticket for each monthly pass, and a free round-trip off-peak ticket for each weekly pass, purchased in December.

Support for the discounts was far from unanimous.

Dean G. Skelos, a Nassau County Republican and the deputy majority leader in the New York State Senate, told the board that the discount "fails to address the Long Island Rail Road's falling ridership and the serious challenges concerning the M.T.A. in 2006 and beyond."

He asked: "How does this plan promote ridership - not for five weeks but for five years? It doesn't. And how does this plan convince commuters that the M.T.A. understands the incredible strain higher fares place on household budgets? It doesn't."

Andrew M. Saul, who represents Westchester County on the board, noted that the surplus was largely driven by unexpectedly high real estate taxes and low interest rates - a situation that might not occur again.

He suggested that the authority "bank the surplus" for future use rather than the discounts. "I'm not sure in the long term that this is really in the interest of the riders," he said. "This agency is facing tremendous financial stress going forward."

Mr. Saul voted against the transit discounts, as did Mitchell H. Pally, who represents Suffolk County.

Andrew B. Albert, a nonvoting board member who represents city subway and bus riders, said the discounts could foster a perception that the authority is "awash in money" and deepen public distrust.

"I am afraid that the unfortunate timing of this could be a drag on the passage of the bond issue, which we all agree is of the utmost importance," he said.

Mr. Kalikow, who appeared subdued, responded, "I share your view of the precarious position that the bond act is in. Nobody has fought for it harder than I have, and I would reiterate again, that this holiday reduction is a small piece of what we do and in no way would it ameliorate a fare increase of any magnitude."

The authority maintained that board approval was technically not necessary to implement the discount, but Mr. Kalikow had said the plan would not move forward without the board's assent.

Before voting, the board rejected a proposal by James H. Harding Jr., one of six members who represent Mr. Pataki on the board, to delay a decision on the discounts until after Election Day, when the bond act is decided. Mr. Kalikow said such a delay would make it difficult to put the discounts in effect by Thanksgiving.
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Old October 29th, 2005, 09:52 PM   #113
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Good news, I saw more maintainance work are doing these days on NYC subway as well.
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Old October 30th, 2005, 04:13 AM   #114
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Yea, because the system is starting to fall apart since its 101 years old...just reached 101 on Thursday.
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Old November 2nd, 2005, 02:05 AM   #115
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New York Subway Bag Inspections - Public Safety vs. Personal Privacy?

Trial Focuses on Legality Of Bag Searches on Subway
By SEWELL CHAN
1 November 2005
The New York Times

The tension between public safety and personal privacy was the subject of vigorous debate yesterday, at the start of the trial of the New York Civil Liberties Union's lawsuit challenging police inspections of bags and packages at subway entrances.

The civil liberties group argues that the searches violate the Fourth Amendment's guarantee against illegal searches and seizures, while the city asserts that they are an effective deterrent to a terrorist attack. The Police Department began the searches on July 21, after the London subway and bus system was attacked for the second time that month, and has vowed to continue the policy.

The case is being watched closely. The city government's top lawyer, Corporation Counsel Michael A. Cardozo, whose office is defending the policy, sat in on the trial, in Federal District Court in Manhattan, as did the Police Department's general counsel, S. Andrew Schaffer.

Judge Richard M. Berman, who will decide the case after closing arguments on Dec. 2, heard starkly divergent interpretations of the policy. Christopher Dunn, the civil liberties union's top lawyer in the case, said, ''The only people being searched under this program are innocent New Yorkers.'' The searches have not uncovered any terrorist plot, or even contraband, he said.

Gail Donoghue, the city's lead lawyer in the case, said the searches were part of a rational strategy calculated to ''keep terrorist planning and operations off balance.'' By adding an element of unpredictability, she said, the policy ''effectively hardens New York City targets and drives terrorist planning elsewhere.''

Three police officials testified, including David Cohen, the deputy police commissioner for intelligence, who worked at the Central Intelligence Agency from 1966 to 2000. He was the agency's deputy director for operations, overseeing clandestine work, from 1995 to 1997, and helped create a unit dedicated to finding Osama bin Laden.

''Unpredictability is the enemy of the terrorist and the ally of those who are trying to prevent or deter another terrorist attack,'' he said.

Mr. Cohen, who joined the Police Department in 2002, conceded that at any time searches were conducted at only a few stations. ''It's not a perfect world, so we have to play the odds, so to speak,'' he said.

Another police official, Inspector Kerry R. Sweet, who is also a lawyer, testified that Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly authorized the search policy after two internal meetings on July 21. Inspector Sweet said he and two other department lawyers, Mr. Schaffer and Lt. Daniel J. Albano, were asked to devise a policy ''within constitutional boundaries.''

The five plaintiffs in the lawsuit all testified about their objections. The lead plaintiff, Brendan A. MacWade, who was inside the World Trade Center during the Sept. 11 attack, submitted to a bag search at the Chambers Street station, on the A, C and E lines in Lower Manhattan, on July 22.

Under cross-examination by Peter G. Farrell, a lawyer for the city, Mr. MacWade acknowledged that his bags had been searched at sporting arenas, airports and courthouses, but he rejected the comparison. ''I view the freedom of movement of the subways as similar to that of the streets,'' he said.

Another plaintiff, Joseph E. Gehring Jr., a lawyer, said the search policy could cause him to violate his ethical obligations to keep client information confidential. A third plaintiff, Partha Banerjee, said he had felt humiliated when his bag was searched at a political rally several years ago.

While riders selected for a search have the option of refusing and exiting the subways, two plaintiffs -- Norman W. Murphy, a federal worker, and Andrew D. Schonebaum, a social worker -- said they viewed that choice as illusory because they have to take the subway to and from work.

A third police official, Deputy Chief Owen J. Monaghan of the Transit Bureau, said he did not know how many searches had been conducted. He confirmed that the officers use a numerical formula -- every 5th, 12th or 20th person with a bag or package, for example.

Mr. Dunn's central argument is that the searches are not pervasive and therefore not effective enough to warrant the intrusion. The civil liberties union hired testers who visited subway stations 3,288 times from Aug. 25 to Sept. 16, and encountered searches in only 34 instances. The city's lawyers disputed the relevance and validity of the sample.

The most dramatic moment of the day came at the end of Mr. Cohen's testimony, when two men in the audience loudly began to demand why he had not been cross-examined.
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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:31 AM   #116
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New NYC Subway Cars!

The newest NYC subway cars were unveiled to the press/public recently.

EVERYTHING STOLEN FROM http://www.subtextnyc.com

As you can see, the two cars don't look all that different from the outside...



...or on the inside. However, there is one significant enhancement inside the trains





Welcome the new Flexible Information and Notice Display, or FIND system! Since the open house viewing of this train was crowded, it was hard to get one good shot of the FIND, so the two above show better detail of the left and right sides of the display.

Let's breakdown what you see here (from left to right):
  • Where you see the (C) displayed here is actually a fully functional TV monitor displaying the basic route information.
  • The Next Stop is clearly highlighted as one of the most important things you might need to know.
  • Each station is displayed in orange with possible transfers listed in green below.
  • Route changes, such as skipped stations, are noted on the board (8 stops away says Will Not Stop in this case).
  • The next ten (10) stops are listed on this side of the display.
  • After the tenth stop, the sign says Further Stops and lists the last five (5) stops for this train.
  • Along with the last six stops, the display changes to let riders know how many stations until these stops.  In this case, there are 25 stops left until the last stop: Far Rockaway.

The text on these displays is a little hard to read, but they are using single LED pixels since they last a really long time without needing replacement and they consume very little power. One problem with the displays on the R143 trains is that the light bulbs indicating each stop burn out leading to rider confusion when attempting to decipher the signs.

According to the TV reporter below, the FIND determines where the train is on the line based on the number of revolutions of the train's wheels! This brings up way more questions than answers for me, but finding details online are scarce and the folks on hand today just didn't know the inner workings. If you didn't know this, the NYC subway is one of the few in the world without a central signaling system. Since it runs 24-hours a day, retrofitting it is practically impossible. Therefore, some creative engineering comes into play when upgrading the technology we see in use.





Two more shots of the FIND show that the monitor on the left is, in fact, a TV capable of different displays. Rumor has it that there will be three of the FIND displays in each car! I guess advertising space isn't selling that well, so the MTA is willing to give up the space to something that helps riders get where they are going.  Kudos on that decision, if it proves to be true.





The digital displays at each end of the train and outside the cars have not changed from the R143 versions.
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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:32 AM   #117
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This is the system used in the current newest cars, the R142/R143:


The problem with these are that they are stationary, and cannot be altered, and the bulbs indicating the stations can burn out.
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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:46 AM   #118
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old news, L train
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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:47 AM   #119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KWEST
old news, L train
If you read the post, you would see how stupid your statement was.
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Old November 30th, 2005, 03:50 AM   #120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asohn
If you read the post, you would see how stupid your statement was.
*read's post* I stand by my statement. How is this news? These cars were out for like 6-8 month now or maybe even more.
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