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Old October 12th, 2006, 11:20 PM   #21
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News??
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Old October 13th, 2006, 05:32 AM   #22
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All routes:

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If you want compatibility with standards and security, ¿why do you recomend firefox and not Opera?

I am Basque, not Russian, the "Siberia" thing is a joke.

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Old October 14th, 2006, 11:31 PM   #23
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News??
The bill to build the Nicaragua Canal in spanish: HERE

The Nicaraguan congress needs to approve the bill before an international bid (currently being planned) is conducted.
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Old October 15th, 2006, 06:21 AM   #24
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How wide would the locks be? I can only assume they would take into consideration a projected increase in size of ships over several decades.

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Old October 15th, 2006, 08:27 PM   #25
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How wide would the locks be? I can only assume they would take into consideration a projected increase in size of ships over several decades.

Length: 1,539 feet (466 meters)
Width: 210 feet (64 meters)
Depth: 112 feet (34 meters)

Able to hold ships of 250,000 dwt
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Old October 17th, 2006, 11:30 PM   #26
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I hope this gets through!
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Old October 23rd, 2006, 08:36 PM   #27
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Nicaragua canal: just a pipe dream?

From the BBC.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 01:42 AM   #28
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Option 6 (using Rio San Juan) should be the cheapest and fastest one to get this Canal done on time and at relative low cost. The other option would take a lot of time and money since it require massive excavation through jungle and mountaineous terrain!
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Old October 24th, 2006, 03:03 AM   #29
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Option 6 (using Rio San Juan) should be the cheapest and fastest one to get this Canal done on time and at relative low cost. The other option would take a lot of time and money since it require massive excavation through jungle and mountaineous terrain!
Actually the Nicaraguan side of the Rio San Juan is heavily forested and is one of the rainiest parts of the world. It is also a protected area. Another problem is that the southern bank of the river is Costa Rica's and they might put up a fuss about it. Although the Costa Ricans are trying to settle differences all of a sudden, out of nowhere -- maybe they are trying to ge the canal constructed through there. I am surprised most of the news agencies (bbc, economist) show the San Juan route instead of the #3 route.


Im gonna find a map that shows that the route #3 is better because the terrain is very flat just a few hill reaching 50 to 70 meters or so.

Too bad google earth shows the area covered in clouds.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 05:00 AM   #30
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Panama is currently having a referendum on enlargement of their own canal. They are aware that the Nicaragua plan might jeapordise their canal, so they want theirs enlarged as soon as possible.
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Old October 24th, 2006, 05:56 AM   #31
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Panama is currently having a referendum on enlargement of their own canal. They are aware that the Nicaragua plan might jeapordise their canal, so they want theirs enlarged as soon as possible.
Yes, we are aware of this and they passed the referendum. However, Nicaragua will continue with it's plans to build the canal because the demand for another canal is there. The Panama Canal expansion will help alleviate the problem of congestion but in 10 years there other routes will be needed and that is where the Nicaragua Canal comes in. The media has made it a canal vs canal issue but it's really not, especially now that the Panama referendum was passed (the media even got the wrong Nicaragua Canal route). In summary the Nicaragua Canal will not jeopardize their route because both will be needed are are probably needed now. Many ships are on the wait list months ahead of time to be able to pass through the Panama Canal.
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Old October 25th, 2006, 03:47 AM   #32
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Nicaragua's Elusive "Grand Canal" Dream in Sight

MANAGUA, Nicaragua - Five centuries after Spain's King Carlos V first thought of cutting a canal through Nicaragua to link the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, the tiny nation has a date in sight for a "Grand Canal" to dwarf Panama's.

INTERVIEW - Nicaragua's Elusive "Grand Canal" Dream in Sight
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Old November 12th, 2006, 06:05 AM   #33
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Update: There is a new presidente, Daniel Ortega. So we haven't heard anything official from him but from past newspapers articles I've read he is very intersted in building a canal and used it to campaign. So we will see!
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Old January 10th, 2007, 11:34 AM   #34
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Update!

Samuel Santos, the new foreign minister for Nicaragua under the presidency of Daniel Ortega has met with the foreign commission representative of Korea, Kim Wom Hung, and the foreign vice minister of Japan, Midori Matsuhsima. The Japanese and Korean delegates expressed interest in the Nicaragua Canal project.

The local newspapers believe that the Nicaragua Canal project will be an important goal of the Ortega administration given the fact that Samuel Santos was apointed as foreign minister. Santos has been part of the Nicaragua Canal commission that studied the canal proposal and found it to be feasible and is one of it's most outspoken supporters.

According to the newspaper la prensa, the Nicaragua canal has been of interest to countries like China since 1989.

Hopefully there will be more news soon.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 11:06 AM   #35
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I doubt the canal could be built without locks. The level of the Pacific Ocean is higher than the Carribean Sea. To accomodate 250,000 ton tankers the depth would need to be about 65 feet or 20 meters. If it is to use locks it would be using much more water from the lake to fill the locks than the current Panama Canal. It may even deplete the lake.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 01:04 PM   #36
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I doubt the canal could be built without locks. The level of the Pacific Ocean is higher than the Carribean Sea. To accomodate 250,000 ton tankers the depth would need to be about 65 feet or 20 meters.
Yes, it will have locks, it shows them on the following diagram. Esclusa is spanish for lock. They will be up to 35 meters deep so that should not be a problem.

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Old January 20th, 2007, 02:48 PM   #37
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If it is to use locks it would be using much more water from the lake to fill the locks than the current Panama Canal. It may even deplete the lake.
No, Nicaragua has lots of water, not just from the lake but from rivers on it's east coast. Also, the lake's waters would be regulated by the San Isidro dam so that the lake does not empty as much water through the River San Juan (lake's outlet to the sea) as it does now, so that will help dam the lake a bit and empty out it's waters through the locks instead. Also, the eastern locks will receive plenty of water from surrounding river tributaries such as the Escondido River's tributaries, and the area around the eastern locks has close to 100 inches of rain per year or more. There are plans to reforest the surrounding area to maintain adequate water needs.

In fact, there is so much water that it makes Nicaragua's canal a better choice than Panama's, they will have to recycle their water but Nicaragua does not have a problem with that.

Here is a diagram that shows the amount of precipitation on the:
  • eastern route
  • lake basin
  • on the lake
  • on the souteast
It also shows the area of the lake and the area of the basin.
According to the table the amount of water that is discharged from the San Juan River daily is 41,213,000 cubic meters and the amount of water that the canal will need to operate is 6,600,000 cubic meters. So there's plenty of water, they'll just need to reforest to maintain the level of water flow.

The last two columns show that the lake is just roughly 30 meters above sea level.

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Old April 21st, 2007, 12:39 PM   #38
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Nicaragua invites Central America to join it in building the inter oceanic canal.

Spanish:
http://www.maritimoportuario.cl/new/...hp?pagina=3837
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Old April 26th, 2007, 08:37 AM   #39
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Good article on the possible usage of Lake Nicaragua for the inter oceanic canal:

Lake Nicaragua is one of the largest reservoirs of fresh water in the Americas. Its outflow through the San Juan River (averaging 475 m³/sec), as well as its capacity for storage, high water quality, its geographic location, and its connection with the Caribbean Sea through the San Juan River are features that render it attractive for a number of purposes, such as navigation, energy production, irrigation, potable water supply, tourism, recreation, and fishing, to name the principal ones. For many years, transportation on the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua has been an important factor in the socioeconomic and political development of Nicaragua. Interest in the construction of an inter-oceanic route tapping the potential of the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua dates back to Spanish colonial times. The first historical data records that the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua were used to transport the riches discovered on the western coasts of South America and shipped to Spain during the conquest of the continent. History shows that since 1504, Nicaragua has made over 10 attempts to construct an inter-oceanic canal. To date, however, none of the projects has come to fruition.

With the discovery of gold in California (1848), transiting North Americans sought a faster route to the gold mines through the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua. Reports from that time indicate that in 1853 some 20,800 traveled from the East Coast to the West Coast of the United States using that route. Other data show that at that time some 2,000 passengers were transported via that route on a monthly basis. However, an earthquake that occurred in July 1863 increased sedimentation in the San Juan River mouth, greatly increasing the difficulties of navigating that part of the river. Later, the construction of the transcontinental railway across the US in 1869 put an end to the great demand for passenger transport through Nicaragua.

Nevertheless, at the beginning of this century, interest in commercial navigation through Lake Nicaragua resumed. Of the studies conducted since the 1900s on the construction of an inter-oceanic canal, the following are noteworthy:

*

Isthmian Canal Commission, 1899-1901
*

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1929-1931
*

Canal Study Commission, 1970
*

Japanese Commission, 1989

Further projects related to the construction of an inter-oceanic canal have been presented more recently, using either the waters of the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua or building a railway connecting the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean, or a combination of the two.

A number of boats operated on Lake Nicaragua and in the San Juan River and its tributaries, facilitate the trading of goods with the Pacific region of the country and the transport of passengers to towns located in the western sector of the lake and in the Pacific zone. In some communities like North San Juan, existing water-based transportation routes between communities in Costa Rica is well known. Practically all the trade in between these communities takes place through Puerto Viejo in the Sarapiquí canton. Also, emergency medical attention and sometimes other basic services, such as telephone communications with Nicaragua and education, are obtained through Costa Rica, along the waterways.

The main port facilities located in the SJRB are the following: San Juan del Norte, El Castillo, and Sábalos, located on the San Juan River; Granada, San Jorge, San Carlos, and San Miguelito, located on the banks of Lake Nicaragua; and Moyogalpa, Altagracia, and Solentiname, located on Ometepe Island and in the Solentiname Archipelago, respectively. Los Chiles, Puerto Viejo, and Barra Colorado are ports situated on the tributaries flowing from the southern sector of the basin. A feasibility study of the local transportation system in Lake Nicaragua and in the San Juan River conducted in 1970 found that the economic and financial benefit of the project was positive. Since then, however, there have been no new estimates on local navigation in these water bodies.

Navigation on the San Juan River and in Lake Nicaragua are affected by the progressive sedimentation of both water bodies. Navigation is also an important source of pollution of the water resources, due to the fact that boats are washed and serviced in both water bodies.

The waterbodies, therefore, become depositaries of hydrocarbon residue, agricultural chemicals, basic grains, pigs, domesticated animals, and other products that are transported across these bodies of water.

The basin’s water resources have great potential for hydroelectric generation. The considerable flow rates, combined with significant altitude changes within the basin, have led to the development of this type of project in the SJRB. To date, there are four known hydroelectric development proposals to use the average flow rate at which Lake Nicaragua empties into the San Juan River as the source of the power supply. None of these options have been discarded as yet. The projects are: Tipitapa-Tamarindo, Brito, Brito Residual, and Interlagos.

The construction of any of these projects will mean substantive changes in the average flow rate of the San Juan River, reducing it by some 36%. This will undoubtedly have a strong impact on navigation in the river. Aspects to be considered if these projects are implemented should be their effects on the aquatic life in the San Juan River and Lake Nicaragua, the flora and fauna existing in the area to be inundated by the proposed dams, and the environmental impact that will result from all the associated construction works.

In addition to the large projects discussed above, there are currently several public and private hydroelectric projects in the southern sector of the SJRB, which are at different stages of development. The private projects are approved by the ICE and carried out by private firms.

The possible conflicts in water use are one of the aspects evoked whenever an option for hydroelectric power or inter-oceanic canal construction is presented, especially since between 300 and 400 m³/sec of the existing river flows abstracted to meet the requirements for potable water and irrigation water supplying suitable farmland in the Pacific Region of Nicaragua.

On the banks of lakes Managua and Nicaragua and in the León-Chinandega plain, there are 742,000 hectares of land suitable for irrigation (152,000 ha in the Lake Managua zone, 432,000 ha in the area of Lake Nicaragua, and 158,000 distributed in the León-Chinandega area). The potential, available water in the León-Chinandega plain and along the banks of the lakes is approximately 745 MMC. This volume could provide the water supply to irrigate approximately 138,000 ha, resulting in a shortfall in the amount needed to irrigate some 600,000 ha. To make up for this shortfall, a number of different alternative projects have been proposed, all of them drawing on Lake Nicaragua as the source. The most recent study, "Irrigation Strategy for Pacific Nicaragua", envisaged damming the waters of the San Juan River at San Isidro, maintaining the water level of Lake Managua at 32 masl, draining water from Lake Nicaragua into Lake Managua by constructing a canal on the Tipitapa River, and pumping the water available up to the 100 masl mark. This scheme would then irrigate, using gravity, the 600,000 ha needing irrigation that are below this elevation. This project envisages generating power through the Tamarindo River, the replenishing of Lake Managua and the provision of drinking water supplies to towns requiring this service, including Managua.

Like the hydroelectric projects, this project will change the average flow rate of the San Juan River, which, in turn, will impact heavily on navigation of the river. Aspects to be considered with this project should be the effects on aquatic life related to the San Juan River, lakes Nicaragua and Managua, the existing flora and fauna in the area to be flooded by the proposed dam, and the environmental impact of the construction and all related works. There is conflict in the use of water for this irrigation project because, the wider the area irrigated, the less water available for power generation and the drinking water supply.

Though the drinking water supply is a problem in the basin, it does not place any particular pressure on the resource because of the size of the demand. However, municipal and industrial wastewater does indeed pose a threat to water quality. Due to the fact that most of the population deposits its used water in riverbeds, streams, or directly in the lake or river with no prior treatment, the quality of the water of those bodies of water has noticeably deteriorated. Critical points are San Miguelito, San Jorge, Granada, Juigalpa, San Carlos, El Castillo, Sábalos and San Juan del Norte.

Source: The General Secretariat of the Organization of American States (“GS/OAS”)
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Old April 26th, 2007, 07:20 PM   #40
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I'm all for it now, look at Panama City, it has an amazing skyline with big corporations located in Panama. If you look at San Jose, Manague, San Salvador, Tegucigalpa or Guatemala City, it looks bland.
Have you been in guatemala City in the last years? There is a huge difference with the other cities you mention.
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