daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 19th, 2011, 07:59 AM   #321
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785



Photo taken on Dec. 16, 2011 shows a project of public rental housing under construction in Beijing, capital of China. The public rental housing project in Shijingshan District of Beijing was topped off on Friday. As the largest public rental housing project in Beijing now, it covers a construction area of 155,289 square meters and provides 2436 housing units. (Xinhua/Luo Xiaoguang)
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 29th, 2011, 05:41 AM   #322
little universe
A Living Sculpture
 
little universe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South by Southeast
Posts: 11,333

Beijing Galaxy SOHO construction update

from www.beijingupdates.com













__________________
我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


Highcliff liked this post
little universe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2011, 09:40 AM   #323
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

More than buildings
China Daily
13:58, December 27, 2011

Beijing will strive to become a world-class cultural center by the year 2020.

As the capital, the city has never lacked the capacity to erect symbolic structures, but buildings alone do not make a cultural center.

Yet what is particularly noteworthy about the proposal is the construction projects involved, such as the restoration of the ancient wall towers at the southeastern and southwestern corners of the old outer city wall. Dongcheng district government will also spend 800 million yuan ($126 million), starting next year, on either reconstructing some lost structures or renovating some streets to make them look old. The city will also construct new clusters of theatres or museums.

There is no doubt that the new projects will add to the magnificence of the city's appearance and the new theatres and museums will provide both domestic and international visitors with more opportunities to enjoy exhibitions and shows.

However, in an increasingly pluralistic society, the government will have difficulty deciding what kind of art or performance will inhabit these spaces.

We've also noticed that Beijing will set up an office for the creation of masterpieces of art, launch art contribution awards to honor outstanding artists, and a fund to financially support artistic creations.

Support from the government is certainly not a bad thing and makes a difference to a nation's cultural life. When we look back through history, governments of various types have contributed to the creation of masterpieces.

However, what Beijing municipal government needs to think of before squandering its money on high-profile projects is the fact that the creation of art needs the right environment and the building of culture is a long process of accumulation.

Having been the capital of the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties (1271-1911), if the existing cultural heritage can be kept in good shape, the capital city does not lack heritage to support its status as a city of cultural significance. The consolidation and renovation of most traditional courtyards within the city center launched by Beijing municipal government more than a year ago is the right approach in this regard.

Beijing has done a great deal to protect its cultural heritage, both tangible and intangible, in the past decades, and if this can be maintained and artists have the incentive to create, cultural prosperity will not be that far away.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2012, 02:37 PM   #324
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Beijing home prices drop 11 percent in 2011: association

BEIJING, Jan. 15 (Xinhua) -- Prices for new residential apartments in Beijing are estimated to have dropped by 11.3 percent year on year in 2011, as the government's policies to cool the sizzling property market took hold.

The average price of a new apartment in the Chinese capital dropped to 13,173 yuan (2,091 U.S. dollars) per square meter in 2011, when about 78,000 units were sold, the Beijing Real Estate Association reported.

China's housing market slumped after the government implemented new policies in early 2011 to curb speculation, including increased deposit requirements and second-home purchase restrictions.

According to the association's report, about 90 percent of housing sales went to families who did not own any property, which suggested that the policies have squeezed out speculative capital in the market.

While tightening its grip on the commercial property market, the city boosted the construction of low-income housing projects. A total of 32,000 low-income housing units were sold in 2011, up 38.5 percent from a year earlier.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2012, 12:25 PM   #325
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Arid capital to get water from key project
Updated: 2012-01-14 07:35
By Jin Zhu (China Daily)

NANJING - A large part of Beijing's water will be supplied by the middle route of the South-to-North Water Diversion (SNWD) project when it is completed in 2014 as part of the major efforts to relieve the thirsty capital, officials said.

The project will transfer at least 1 billion cubic meters of water to Beijing a year, accounting for one-fourth of the city's annual water supply, said Sun Guosheng, director of the Beijing branch of the SNWD project office, under the State Council.

At present, Beijing needs about 3.6 billion cubic meters of water a year. That will increase to 4 to 5 billion cubic meters by 2020 as economic growth continues to surge, Sun told China Daily on Wednesday during a three-day work conference in Nanjing, Jiangsu province.

Partly because of consecutive years of drought, the volume of Miyun reservoir, the city's major source of surface water, has stayed at 1.1 billion cubic meters, according to the Beijing Water Authority.

The average depth of groundwater in Beijing is at 25 meters now, significantly lower than 12 meters in 1999, due to years of overuse, according to the water authority.

"Without the extra water brought from outside, the city has certainly suffered from severe water shortages in recent years," he said.

Since 2008, the Beijing-Shijiazhuang section of the middle route of the SNWD project, linking reservoirs in Hebei with Beijing, began supplying water as an emergency measure to help ease the shortage in the capital.

By the end of 2011, up to 1.1 billion cubic meters of water had been transferred to the city, according to the SNWD project office.

"The quality of the diverted water is Grade 2, which is drinkable after treatment. All of that water has been supplied to residences," Sun said.

The SNWD project will divert water from the Yangtze River in the south via an eastern, middle and western route to satisfy the water demand in the arid northern regions of China.

The eastern route will transfer water from East China's Jiangsu province along the Yangtze River to Tianjin, near Beijing, starting in 2013.

The middle route will supply water from the Danjiangkou Reservoir in Central China's Hubei province into large cities including Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Zhengzhou, in 2014.

By the end of 2011, 330,000 people in Henan and Hubei province had to be relocated to make way for the central route, according to the SNWD project office.

"The remaining 15,000 people will be resettled in the first half of this year, which will complete the relocations," E Jingping, head of the SNWD project office, said at the conference.

More than 64 billion yuan ($10.13 billion) will be invested in the water diversion project this year as it goes into high gear, he said.

China invested 57.8 billion yuan in the project in 2011, bringing the total investment to 137.6 billion yuan so far, official figures showed.

Experts with E's office said the western route, meant to replenish the Yellow River with water diverted from the upper reaches of the Yangtze River, now is still at the blueprint stage.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 27th, 2012, 11:45 PM   #326
Ŝróndeimr
Adventurous!
 
Ŝróndeimr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Trondheim, Norway
Posts: 12,221
Likes (Received): 2264

Poly International Plaza T2
A office complex consisting of three towers, 31 (152,8m), 16 (84m) and 12 (67.2m) floors tall planned to start construction in 2012. Its scheduled
completion in 2014 and is located in Wang Jing, Chaoyang District along the Airport Expressway (see map below). SOM (Skidmore, Owings and
Merrill) is the architects of the project.

View the renderings in high resolution


Illustration by MIR


Illustration by SOM (Crystal CG?)


Illustration by MIR







Location of the project.


Technical data about the project (copied from this PDF-brochure [731Kb])
__________________

Highcliff liked this post
Ŝróndeimr no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 28th, 2012, 02:15 AM   #327
lianli
Registered User
 
lianli's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Frankfurt/Stuttgart/Shanghai
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 93


Thanks for the additional info!
I think it's a pity that the two smaller towers/buildings aren't in the same design like the taller one.
lianli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 28th, 2012, 10:23 AM   #328
Ŝróndeimr
Adventurous!
 
Ŝróndeimr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Trondheim, Norway
Posts: 12,221
Likes (Received): 2264

Quote:
Originally Posted by lianli View Post

Thanks for the additional info!
I think it's a pity that the two smaller towers/buildings aren't in the same design like the taller one.
I think its good that they aren't in the same design as the main tower, adds more variety to the complex and the tallest building stand out in both height and design.
Ŝróndeimr no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 28th, 2012, 01:00 PM   #329
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 53,709
Likes (Received): 19502

amazig!
__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2012, 10:07 AM   #330
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

It's got that Hearst Tower and Norman Foster feel!
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2012, 02:51 PM   #331
deepblue01
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 859
Likes (Received): 66

Most towers look some what the same nowadays anyways.
deepblue01 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2012, 03:25 PM   #332
540_804
VA is for LOVERS!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Roanoke and Richmond, VA
Posts: 713
Likes (Received): 87

Any updates on SoHo?

One of my favorite projects in Beijing right now.
540_804 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2012, 08:42 AM   #333
little universe
A Living Sculpture
 
little universe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South by Southeast
Posts: 11,333



Which SOHO project you refer to? Wangjing SOHO or Galaxy SOHO? Both of them are under construction ATM.

From www.beijingupdates.com


Galaxy SOHO at East Second Ring Road













Wangjing SOHO at Wangjing New Area




__________________
我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


Highcliff liked this post
little universe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2012, 01:29 AM   #334
540_804
VA is for LOVERS!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Roanoke and Richmond, VA
Posts: 713
Likes (Received): 87

Both, as a matter of fact.
540_804 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2012, 04:25 AM   #335
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 53,709
Likes (Received): 19502

oh my god!! or, oh dios mio!!! hahaha

incredible!!!
__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 1st, 2012, 04:52 AM   #336
Bond James Bond
Licence to kill.
 
Bond James Bond's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
Posts: 9,419

Wow, those Soho projects look right out of Buck Rogers.
Bond James Bond no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2012, 07:15 PM   #337
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

Beijing rolls out huge forestation plan
Updated: 2012-01-13 21:04
China Daily

Millions of trees that cover an area of 1 million mu (66,667 hectares) will be planted in Beijing in the next three years, according to a top government official.

Starting from March, the city will begin planting trees between its fifth and sixth ring roads, on 200,000 mu of land this year, said Chen Gang, the city's Deputy Mayor, at the 5th session of the 13th Beijing Municipal Congress on Thursday.

Some villages will be smartened up, and desolate waste land will be reused to make room for the forestation, which is estimated to take up an expanded area of 1 million mu by the end of 2014, he said.

A series of measures combating the city's serious environmental pollution were set forth at the meeting. Besides the ambitious forestation plan, Beijing will also promote more stringent emission standards, improve fuel oil quality, and strengthen the control of dust at construction sites and so on.

Beijing last week reported a decline in PM2.5 density during the past decade. The number – 70 to 80 micrograms per cubic meter – is still double the standard 35 micrograms set by the Ministry of Environmental Protection, though.

The city's latest anti-pollution efforts are being directed at updating air quality monitoring. Sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and PM10 in the city are being monitored by 27 stations of the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center which releases and updates the data hourly on its website and micro blog.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2012, 11:57 AM   #338
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,464
Likes (Received): 17785

A symbol of preservation
China Daily
13:45, February 18, 2012


The former house of Liang Sicheng and Lin Huiyin in Dongcheng district of Beijing was demolished in January.


A 2009 photo shows a part of the former residence. The demolition proceeded on and off till December 2011, when the house was listed by the State Administration of Cultural Heritage as an "immovable cultural relic".


The leveling of an old-style house in Beijing that was the dwelling of a prominent couple of architects and preservationists has provoked a public outcry.

The demolition of the courtyard house he rented from 1931 to 1937 must have been the last thing Liang Sicheng worried about while he was alive. But for a nation that once sneered at his foresight and calls to protect heritage architecture, it is an ironic symbol for the inexorable advance of the bulldozer and the ravaging of everything that stands in its way.

The man who tried to save old Beijing

More important than that were his efforts, though failed, to protect the city walls of Beijing. In the early years of New China, Liang proposed to leave the old city intact and build a new one to its west. Later, as the city walls fell victim to political winds, he risked everything to save the walls first, then only the wall gates. The then Beijing mayor branded him "despotic" as they engaged in a tug of war over the fate of the old structures.

As they were torn down, Liang lamented: "Whenever a city gate was razed, it was as if they were slicing a piece of my flesh; whenever a section of the wall was gone, it was like skinning me."

We can't appreciate the void because very few of us have seen old Beijing in its authentic majesty, but we can probably understand Liang's frustration. He must have felt like the proverbial bug that tried to stop a rumbling carriage. Yes, he was crushed mercilessly. And we're all poorer for it.

"In 50 years, you'll know I'm right," Liang said famously. How prescient those words seem now.

In a sense, people today are trying to repeat on a very small scale the epic battle Liang attempted but tragically failed - and also to honor him in the process. Of all the residences he inhabited, the house at 24, Beizongbu Hutong, Dongcheng district of Beijing, stands out for two reasons: It was during the Liang couple's stay here that they studied and confirmed the dates and value of many historical works of architecture.

Sure, they conducted their scholarly research in the field, away from home. But while they were in Beijing, their residence served as a salon for the city's literati, attracting luminaries like novelist Shen Congwen and philosopher Jin Yuelin.

As Shan Jixiang, former director of the State Administration of Cultural Heritage, elucidates: "The emphasis should be placed on the transcendental, cultural and social values of an old residence, rather than purely on the architectural quality and artistic value."

Preserving Liang's old residence is tantamount to holding on to what he stands for: treasuring the tangible and immovable objects that were bequeathed to us by our ancestors and cement our cultural identity. We have made so many blunders before. Can't we save just this little piece of old Beijing?

Hutong in ruins

Large swaths of hutong (narrow lanes) and siheyuan (courtyard houses) have already given way to canyons of high rises. In the old days, when Chinese were barely skirting the poverty line, these old buildings, often rundown and crammed with a dozen or more households in a space designed for one, were perceived as eyesores. They do not have indoor plumbing, flush toilets or other modern amenities. People in the 1980s were eager to move out and into apartment buildings.

But the rapid rise of living standards and growing exposure to outside influences have awakened in us the intrinsic value of these uniquely Beijing residential forms. It did not take long before they crumbled in large expanses in the face of urban renewal.

Nationwide, the scene of destruction is multiplied hundreds of times as anything that obstructs the maximizing of profits is treated the same way so-called "class enemies" were dealt with in an earlier era.

If you talk to real estate developers and those who share their interests, you'll hear something different: These old buildings are invariably in ramshackle conditions, violating fire codes and otherwise not up to modern standards of safety or comfort. But they conveniently omit the fact these buildings tend to occupy large tracts of prime land, and their existence in the current mode will block the developers from realizing the highest profits from the land.

These people will be quick to add that they love traditional Chinese architecture more than anyone. As a matter of fact, they will rebuild this or that structure exactly as it looked in its most glorious days, but with reinforced beams and concrete pillars covered with wooden panels. In other words, they want the best of a theme park and a museum: seemingly ancient buildings with all the trappings of modernity.

That said, not all the "fake antique structures" are monstrosities. Some are tastefully designed and do not claim to have historical significance.

Where the famous once dwelt

The same contradiction manifests itself in some people's attitudes toward residences of the famed. On the one hand, the drive to raze old buildings rarely spare those surrounded by the luster of the distinguished residents, on the other hand there is an urge to associate a place with the big names of yore. In recent years, some local governments have ventured so far as to fight for the "official hometown" of fictional characters that surface only in novels or fairy tales.

One village I visited in 2011 constructed a new house it claimed to be the ancestral residence of an ancient general, in order to "enhance our cultural gravitas", to quote the village chief. But to his chagrin, he later found out another village in a nearby province had already claimed the same general to be their "native son".

What is the appropriate level of protection for old residences with historical value? Do we have to turn every one of them into a mini-museum? The cultural heritage bureaus can designate these buildings, but they usually do not provide the financial wherewithal for upkeep or protection. That is why local governments often take the side of developers.

Indeed, a few of these buildings can be turned into tourist destinations, but most do not have that potential. For those with low historical value and low tourism promise, some kind of middle ground should be found between indiscriminate demolition and strict protection. In this heyday of economic growth, it is unfeasible to expect the ubiquitous stipulation of "maintain it as it is" to counter the visual blaring of "chai!" (tear down).

Maybe some buildings should be allowed indoor renewal while keeping the facade. Others can leave the ground floor for public viewing with private spaces reserved for current owners.

One thing that can be done without too much cost or hassle - but with thorough research - is to place small plaques on those buildings once resided in by prominent citizens of the country or city. Just the name, the profession and the dates of stay will suffice.

Imagine how much a casual passerby will feel walking down the street with such "annotated" buildings. It'll be like walking down a history book.

Getting back to Liang Sicheng, who was the uncle of Maya Lin and the son of the great Liang Qichao. The public gets emotional about his home partly because most people who are not part of the intelligentsia learned about him and his love story through a wildly popular television soap opera.

Suddenly this pioneer of Chinese architecture and its preservation was humanized. You see history condensed in and refracted through one renowned family. That adds to the intangible value of his erstwhile abode. If only the people in charge of developing that property knew what an added asset that is.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Highcliff liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2012, 01:10 PM   #339
little universe
A Living Sculpture
 
little universe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South by Southeast
Posts: 11,333

Beijing Bohai Innovation City

For more information click on archdaily link









__________________
我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


Highcliff liked this post
little universe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2012, 01:17 PM   #340
lianli
Registered User
 
lianli's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Frankfurt/Stuttgart/Shanghai
Posts: 554
Likes (Received): 93


Where in Beijing is this "city" located?
lianli no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
beijing

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 09:59 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu