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Old May 29th, 2012, 11:15 AM   #401
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From BBC


(The image: Galaxy SOHO)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-17655523

Quote:
Old haunts gone as Beijing embraces building boom

By Martin Patience
BBC News, Beijing
29 May 2012 Last updated at 00:23 GMT





With its swooping curves and futuristic look, Galaxy SOHO is rapidly taking shape.

The 20-storey office complex is the latest addition to Beijing's skyline.

Teams of welders, electricians, and joiners are hard at work on the building, which is scheduled to be complete by the end of the summer.

It is the latest creation of SOHO China - a property development company that has a reputation for ambitious projects.

"I've been attracted to China for a long time," said Zaha Hadid, the world-renowned architect who designed the office complex.

She said the appeal of the world's second-largest economy was that it was possible to get projects off the ground.

"In Europe or America I don't think there's the will-power or audacity to do these projects. It's a very exciting market here."

As China's economy has boomed its skylines have soared.

At current rates of construction, the country can build a city the size of Rome every two weeks, according to the Economist Intelligence Unit.

With millions of Chinese pouring into the cities every year, the building boom is expected to continue.

"Urbanisation in China has happened so fast," said Zhang Xin, the co-founder of SOHO China.

"Before people realised everything was gone - new buildings had gone up and old ones were destroyed."

Hutongs vs skyscrapers

China is no stranger to destruction. During the Cultural Revolution 40 years ago, temples and historic homes were demolished, and artefacts were looted.

But in recent years there has been a new wave of demolition.

In the last decade more than half of Beijing's old neighbourhoods have been bulldozed.

The one-storey houses built around narrow alleyways - called hutongs - have made way for apartment buildings, shopping malls, and office blocks.

Some are asking whether China is sacrificing too much of its heritage in its race to modernise.

The latest area slated for demolition in the centre of the capital has a ghostly feel to it, with only a handful of people still living there.

Zhang Wei, who has spent the last decade documenting the demise of Beijing's old neighbourhoods, said the area had hundreds of years of history.

During imperial times some of the buildings served as barracks for soldiers. He said it was painful to watch it all disappear.

"As a Beijinger, I feel helpless about what's happening here," he said.

"This city carries our memories but now it's losing its soul. We always said that this was a city of culture - but now there's nothing left."

But there are pockets of preservation - some of old Beijing's old neighbourhoods are now major tourist attractions.

They have fancy restaurants, shops selling designer clothes, and little boutiques selling a variety of ornaments, including in one case a porcelain pig dressed in a Maoist military uniform.

"I like it here," said one Chinese tourist. "There is nothing like this is my home town."

But hard cash often trumps heritage in China.

The growing pressures of urbanisation and demands for a better way of life are leading to enormous change.

For Beijing, it is struggle to find the balance between the old and the new.

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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old May 29th, 2012, 11:22 AM   #402
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From Archdaily

Rem Koolhaas was inspecting his own newly finished masterpiece, the CCTV Tower.

Quote:

Enjoy this interesting footage captured by Tomas Koolhaas – son of Rem Koolhaas – in February 2012 of the recently completed China Central Television (CCTV) Headquarters in Beijing. The monumental structure took eight years to complete and is OMA‘s first major building in China, as well as their largest project to date. The building is planned for occupancy later this year to broadcast the London 2012 Olympics. Check out our previous coverage for more building information.
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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
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I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old May 29th, 2012, 11:28 AM   #403
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From Archdaily

Press conference was given by this years's laureate, Chinese Architect Wang Shu/王澍, after 2012 Pritzker Prize ceremony in Beijing last Friday


Quote:
Last Friday we attended the 2012 Pritzker Prize ceremony in Beijing, where Chinese architect Wang Shu from Amateur Studio received the “Nobel of Architecture”.

Last year the ceremony was held in Washington DC with the presence of President Obama, and this year the event was also held in an important political context, at the People’s Hall of Beijing, with the presence of important Chinese government officials related to the urban process of China, including the Mayor of Beijing and the Minister of Housing and Urban-Rural Development.

In my opinion Wang Shu’s architecture presents a contemporary and progressive approach that acknowledges the rich tradition of Chinese architecture, considering not only projects in dense urban contexts but also in the rural areas of China. As the next generations of Chinese architects are influenced by his architecture, a generation that will be an active part of China’s growth, he will indirectly influence how millions will live in the next years.

I think that for the first time the Pritzker Prize became something beyond a mere recognition to the great work of a living architect, turning into a statement on how architecture should face the rapid growth of our cities in the Urban Age to improve the quality of life of the next 3 billion that will move into cities in the next 40 years.

“Winning this award is something unexpected. For many years, I have been pursuing my dream on a lonely course. Before this, I had never published any architectural design collection or designed any buildings outside of China. I always see myself as an amateur architect, so it is absolutely a huge pleasant surprise to receive this honor. I wish to thank the judges for their insight and fair comments. This award is of special importance for the Chinese architectural industry. As a young architect, I have to say that I owe this award to the age we now live in. It is in this golden age that China has achieved unprecedented prosperity and openness, giving me so many opportunities for making difficult architectural experiments in such a short span of time. Here, I wish to thank my partner Lu Wenyu and all my friends who have helped me before.”

“I always say that I am not just designing a building, but a world of diversity and difference and a path that leads us back to the nature. These are the questions I was asking myself when I got to know that I was given the award, and these are the questions I will continue to focus on in my future endeavors.”

You can check our coverage of the past ceremonies: 2009 in Buenos Aires, 2010 in New York, and 2011 in Washington DC.

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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old June 8th, 2012, 12:46 AM   #404
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Pixel in Beijing Modelroom / SAKO Architects

Architects: SAKO Architects
Project Team: Keiichiro Sako, Ariyo Mogami, Ken-ichi Kurimoto
Project Area: 4,800 sqm
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Misae Hiromatsu

http://www.archdaily.com/241020/pixe...ko-architects/















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Old June 8th, 2012, 11:09 AM   #405
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I love the interiors.
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Old June 11th, 2012, 04:39 AM   #406
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Beijing building 45-km underground water tunnel

BEIJING, June 8 (Xinhua) -- Beijing Friday started work on an underground water diversion tunnel to help bring water from the country's south to the thirsty national capital.

The tunnel will be about 44.7 km long and involves an estimated investment of 9.17 billion yuan (1.4 billion U.S. dollars), said He Fengci, a deputy director of the general office of the Beijing Construction Committee of the South-to-North Water Diversion project.

The tunnel will supply water to the downtown area and two suburban areas in the southeast, He said. Local water sources have been unable to meet fast growing demand.

One billion cubic meters of water will be diverted from the Yangtze River, the country's largest, to Beijing annually through the middle route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project after the flood season in 2014, the official said.

The South-to-North Water Diversion Project is designed to divert water from the water-rich south of China, mainly the Yangtze, to the country's arid northern regions.

Over the next few years, Beijing will also finish building 21 other affiliated diversion projects, water conservation projects and water plants.
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Old June 11th, 2012, 05:49 AM   #407
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This makes so much sense.

So diversion tunnels will be a strategy to prevent fatal flooding as well?
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Old June 11th, 2012, 09:04 AM   #408
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I think there dozens of water treatment facilities under construction that will clean flood waters and waste waters for the driest areas of China
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Old June 11th, 2012, 02:39 PM   #409
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Galaxy SOHO updates

image hosted on flickr

Galaxy Soho (Zaha Hadid), Beijing / CN, 2012 by william veerbeek, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Galaxy Soho (Zaha Hadid), Beijing / CN, 2012 by william veerbeek, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Galaxy SOHO under the clouds Beijing 蓝天白云下的银河SOHO by Dennis Wu_双桂坊, on Flickr
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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old June 11th, 2012, 05:30 PM   #410
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deepblue01 View Post
This makes so much sense.

So diversion tunnels will be a strategy to prevent fatal flooding as well?
Flooding isn't a key risk in Beijing, which is quite inland from the sea and is more prone to droughts and sandstorms than torrential rain.
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Old June 11th, 2012, 05:46 PM   #411
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ok, I was referring to the cities that usually experience the floods. I assume that the flood prone places will be where the water will be diverted from or is that a bit too optimistic?
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Old June 11th, 2012, 07:48 PM   #412
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deepblue01 View Post
ok, I was referring to the cities that usually experience the floods. I assume that the flood prone places will be where the water will be diverted from or is that a bit too optimistic?
This would be more applicable along the southern coasts. Here in Hong Kong, huge underground stormwater storage pools have been built to store runoff during torrential rains.

More information : http://www.dsd.gov.hk/others/HKWDT/eng/background.html
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Old June 12th, 2012, 08:16 AM   #413
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When they say that water will be diverted from the Yangtze, does that mean it could prevent the yangtze from flooding, or was drought relief the sole purpose of these tunnels and not flood relief as well?
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Old June 12th, 2012, 08:49 AM   #414
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deepblue01 View Post
When they say that water will be diverted from the Yangtze, does that mean it could prevent the yangtze from flooding, or was drought relief the sole purpose of these tunnels and not flood relief as well?
It would not be flood relief. Any canal / diversion attempts cannot handle the sheer volume of water along the Yangtze basin. There actually is a canal between Hangzhou and Beijing that dates from ancient times already.

This diversion project is purely for drought relief.
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Old June 12th, 2012, 10:04 AM   #415
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Ok, thanks

Well, at least they are solving one problem.

Whats a solution for floods then? Are they working on one?
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Old June 12th, 2012, 03:48 PM   #416
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deepblue01 View Post
Ok, thanks

Well, at least they are solving one problem.

Whats a solution for floods then? Are they working on one?
The Three Gorges Dam is supposed to help alleviate flooding along the Yangtze River. Let's see how that goes ...
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Old June 15th, 2012, 12:46 AM   #417
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Expansion to China WTC

5+design have released their proposal for the planned third phase expansion on the China World Trade Centre, Beijing. The team's new expansion will update and extend the retail facilities currently at the centre and is set to transform the use of the building. By adding these retail opportunities the architects envisage their new addition to the China World Trade Centre becoming a new anchor point for the area, drawing in consumers from all over the city.

They are also transforming an existing area of the mall into an area for high-end retailers to trade from, adding an element of exclusivity and luxury to the centre.

Many of the existing retailers in the mall have wanted the transformation in order to enhance the potential of the shopping experience and the design language is drawn from this. The external facades use an interlacing system of layered glass, some translucent, others transparent adding a contemporary patterned facade for the retail elements. Contrasting this the facade of the office spaces use materials found in the surrounding buildings, fitting in with the cityscape.

The new element from 5+design links all of the existing components of the China World Trade Centre, bringing the existing mall out from underground up to the street level. A series of buildings connect through the site with modern architectural forms, carefully considered materials and thorough planned lighting systems will be illuminated to enhance the flowing movements of the building.

As well as the architectural moves, 5+design have proposed a streetscape plan, adding paths and outdoors areas that link the retail elements together, drawing the life of the street and the mall through one another.

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=19907









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Old June 16th, 2012, 05:32 AM   #418
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So that will be behind New World Hotel Beijing (China World Hotel) and across CCTV Broadcast Center?
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 01:06 PM   #419
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Another Alien like Building in Beijing...Linhai Plaza?

Anyone from Beijing would like to confirm the Chinese Name of it and its location? Couldn't find the right answer by myself through google.

image hosted on flickr

the snail 1 by billyb108, on Flickr
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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old June 27th, 2012, 01:04 PM   #420
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Nobody was able to answer my question?
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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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