daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > City/Metro Compilations

City/Metro Compilations Help report active highrise/urban developments occurring in your city to the global SSC community.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 27th, 2014, 05:11 PM   #561
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tk.Alv-87 View Post
Why posted in this thread?
The issues at the heart of this incident are relevant to many redevelopment projects throughout China. Rather than put it in every single city thread out there, it fits better in a more generic thread like this one.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 29th, 2014, 08:36 AM   #562
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Seven-city cluster to aid growth
27 March 2014
China Daily

As a new city cluster forms around Jinan, the capital city of Shandong province, local authorities expect faster development by effectively using nearby resources.

"As the province's political and economic hub, Jinan will make full use of its advantages in location, talent and business ambience to further improve competitiveness and drive economic growth of cities around it," Yang Luyu, the city's mayor, told China Daily.

Last August, the Shandong provincial government began to implement a regional development strategy that calls for integration of Jinan and six neighboring cities - Laiwu, Zibo, Tai'an, Dezhou, Binzhou and Liaocheng.

The latest move in the integration is a newly announced plan for an intercity rail transport system connecting the seven urban areas. Upon completion, it only will take half an hour to travel from Jinan to six other cities.

The region has a total population of 33.68 million, accounting for 34.8 percent of Shandong's total. It has a land area of 52,076 square kilometers, 33.2 percent of the province's total.

Statistics show that the seven cities generated 1.94 trillion yuan in GDP last year, accounting for 33.9 percent of the provincial total.

According to Yang, the goal of the integration is to boost the region's GDP to 3.5 trillion yuan ($562.1 billion) by 2020, an annual growth of about 9 percent.

Jinan's GDP alone is projected to reach 1 trillion yuan in 2020.

The mayor said the city will have 5.5 million people living in its 400-sq-km urban area by 2020, bringing the urbanization rate to 72 percent.

He said the economic structure will continue to change, with revenues from high-tech companies accounting for 45 percent of the total revenue by all industrial enterprises.

"Environmentally friendly industries like financial and information services, as well as advanced manufacturing, are highlights of the city's development," said Yang.

"We will form competitiveness in seven advanced industries and each will have an annual revenue of more than 100 billion yuan in three or five years," he added.

The sectors include automobiles, railway equipment manufacturing, electronic information, new energy and environmental protection, petrochemicals, advanced materials and medicine, he said.

The city now has about 10 industrial zones to power local growth including the State-level Jinan High-Tech Industrial Development Zone, the Jinan Economic and Technological Development Zone and the Jinan Comprehensive Free Trade Zone.

The Jinan high-tech zone has formed pillar sectors in information, biomedicines, automobiles and electronics. Its software park is among the nation's top four, generating more than 50 billion yuan in sales revenue last year.

Approved by the State Council in 2012, the Jinan free trade zone has a designed area of 15 sq km, where enterprises will have convenient access to trade services ranging from warehousing to customs clearance.

"The first of its kind in Shandong's central and western regions, the zone plays an important role in promoting an export-oriented economy for Jinan and its neighboring cities," said Zhang Duanwu, deputy director of the zone's management committee.

The 260 enterprises in the zone are engaged in such fields as integrated circuits, logistics, equipment manufacturing and biomedicines.

An integrated circuit industrial park built with 5 billion yuan in investment from the Inspur Group is under construction. It is expected to produce 600 million chips annually and generate 10 billion yuan in sales.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 29th, 2014, 07:56 PM   #563
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Lanzhou is key to western China
17 February 2014
Copyright 2014 China Daily Information Company


Source : http://www.pbase.com/ichan

Gansu province capital has ideal location to attract global business

It was as long ago as 1999 that the first moves were made for the development of western China. During this time much of the focus has centered on the south-west and the cities of Chongqing and Chengdu in particular.

But perhaps it is about time for a shift in attention to the rich business opportunities that await those with the foresight to invest in China's northwest.

My work with European businesses of all sizes and from a cross-section of industry categories over many years has revealed an intense interest in the economic evolution of China's second- and third-tier cities, especially the western provinces and cities. However, the slightest probing into any expansion plans across western China also nearly always reveals extremely sparse details.

Tourism appears to lie behind any interest in and knowledge of Sichuan, its capital city Chengdu and the neighboring municipality of Chongqing.

Northwest China is often mistakenly dismissed as "desert" and, therefore, not perceived as any kind of profitable market opportunity.

The few European companies that possess more knowledge of western China also make the mistake of seeing Xi'an as the economic hub and gateway to the entire region.

While Xi'an is indeed an increasingly vibrant economic centre, coupled with a plethora of the most enchanting historical sites in China, its geographical location prevents it from acting as a real gateway to the rest of the region.

Geographical location and development have always been economic bedfellows. Witness the spectacular transformation of Shenzhen and neighboring coastal provinces.

Regional development nearly always requires a central or suitably situated economic urban hub that acts as a key catalyst for growth.

The spread of economic development, it is hoped, across the Chinese mainland is often presented as a gradual "rollout" from the developed eastern cities, such as Shanghai, westwards.

This gradual, step-wise process of development from eastern to western China, however, has not materialized in much significant change, despite the central government's go west initiatives and policies dating back nearly 15 years.

Clearly, a different approach is required. It is woefully insufficient to continue to call for an influx of investment and growth across western China without the establishment of an economic engine, probably located at or near the geographical centre of this region.

The role and responsibility, therefore, of gateway and engine of economic growth of the western falls squarely on the shoulders of Lanzhou, capital of Gansu province.

Lanzhou's location, the geographical centre of northwest China, makes it the key regional transport hub for the entire region, allowing areas further west to maintain railroad connections to the eastern half of the country.

Recent rail network developments have also added further to the attraction of Lanzhou as an investment centre. China's new Silk Railroad, as it has been dubbed, provides a direct rail link between central and western China and western Europe with a dramatic reduction, up to a third, in transport costs.

Such a favorable geographical location presents an ideal building block in the building of Brand Lanzhou. More is needed though in terms of powerful, positive brand associations that attract not just interest and investment from domestic industry but also appeal to the international business community.

Successful cities the world over nearly always create a powerful, distinctive brand in themselves. Beijing has a powerful image based on its rich cultural heritage and Shanghai is perceived as a beacon of fashion and modernity, for example.

Lanzhou's emergence as an economic hub and engine of growth for northwest China also requires a powerful, distinctive brand image

Establishment of such a brand image for Lanzhou requires a collection of carefully combined brand associations.

One such association emerged last year with the setting up of Lanzhou New Area, China's newest special economic zone. In August, the area was approved by the central government as the fifth State-level new special economic development zone (following Pudong in Shanghai, Binhai in Tianjin, Liangjiang in Chongqing and Zhoushan in Zhejiang).

This is also the first State-level new area in the northwest.

The establishment of the Lanzhou New Area marks the central government's latest efforts to boost the development of Northwest China.

Lanzhou, situated in the country's geographical center, has strategic significance by linking together the region serving as a gateway between the northwest's two major cities of Urumqi and Xi'an and a go-between for the adjacent capital cities of Xining and Yinchuan. Therefore, the economic development of Lanzhou is of immense importance for the overall development of Northwest China - and also for the whole country

Economic appeal is key to Lanzhou's brand image but so is the powerful portrayal of its rich history.

The city used to be called the Golden City and, since at least the first millennium BC, it was a major link on the ancient Northern Silk Road and also an important historic Yellow River crossing site. The Great Wall of China is also in close proximity.

Tourism often plays an important part in any city brand image and Lanzhou can also boast significant associations here too.

Major national and international Lanzhou tourist sites include the Five Spring Mountain Park, which was built on the northern side of Gaolan Mountain and is famous for its five springs and several Buddhist temples, the Yellow River Bridge that has connected the transport hub of Lanzhou to the mainland and northwest since the Ming Dynasty when people began to envisage such a crossing to conquer the Yellow River and the Baita Mountain Park which was built close to the surrounding mountains at an elevation of 1,700 meters and opened in 1958 across the Yellow River bridge.

Other notable international attractions include the Lanzhou international marathon, which will take place for a fourth consecutive year, on June 15, 2014.

Of course food is never far away from the heart of any Chinese city's cultural roots and Lanzhou is no exception. Lanzhou beef noodles are a national and increasingly international dish.

A Lanzhou beef noodles bar in the heart of London's fashionable Leicester Square bears witness to the international presence of this dish.

Lanzhou beef noodles, where all the noodles are manually drawn out and, therefore, are also known as hand-pulled noodles, originated in the Tang Dynasty and have won over domestic and international customers with their unique taste and pleasant color.

Crucially, the development of Lanzhou's brand image requires careful co-ordination of powerful and positive brand associations. China's provincial and national governments need to manage this city brand building but also need to accept that advice and input from a variety of branding and advertising agencies, national and international, is essential.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

TowerVerre:), Zaz965 liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2014, 10:09 AM   #564
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Expanding the frontier
An ever-growing network of railway lines is set to transform the city

26 March 2014
South China Morning Post

The history of Zhengzhou is written in the iron of the railway tracks that stitch this city together and to the nation. The city's location is strong enough that Zhengzhou reclaimed its status as the capital of Henan based on its status as a rail hub, wresting the title away from Kaifeng, according to Pan Hanxiao, professor from the department of urban planning at Tongji University.

With a new rail station at the crossroads of China's high-speed rail network and a new metro system, railways are transforming the city.

The 4 billion yuan (HK$5.05 billion) Zhengzhou East Railway station opened in September 2012. "[The station] stands at the crossroads of the two national high-speed rail [lines] - the Beijing-Guangzhou and Xulan railways - [so] it plays an important role in connecting eastern China to western China as well as north to south," says Fox Chu, Accenture Asia-Pacific's director of ports industry.

As China's high-speed rail system develops, it is bringing new visitors in and through Zhengzhou. "More and more people, especially business travellers, will use high-speed rail," Pan predicts. Other key cities, such as Chongqing, Jinan and Taiyuan, will also link up to Zhengzhou through the station in the future, Chu notes.

The station already has a remarkably high standing on a national and regional scale. Chu says the facility is strategic in terms of collecting and distributing traffic in the national high-speed rail network and in the central China economic zone transport network.

The station is also linked to the city's local light-rail system via a stop along Zhengzhou's new subway system. On its first day of operations last December, the 34-kilometre-long Line 1 of the Zhengzhou subway had 100,000 passengers per day, with daily usage soon spiking as high as 290,000.

Pan says the city's population of more than 8 million needed a good transport network. "They could have had a metro earlier, but it's certainly not too late," Pan says.

Indeed, Zhengzhou's rapid development had put "tremendous pressure" on its local transit system and city buses alone were simply insufficient, Chu says. The city is making up for lost time, with plans for an additional four lines and more than 130km of track slated for completion in the next five years, according to local transit officials.

While the subway has an obvious value in relieving congestion, it also brings the city much closer together. Each time the metro connects to a new part of the city, the area's prospects improve.

"That's when people really start to come in; people buy property in new areas once it's connected to the metro centre, even if the property owners drive their own vehicles," says business analyst Wade Shepard.

The raised profile of the neighbourhoods along the metro line may also see a spark in home values. "Generally, real estate prices increase when a metro system is introduced," Pan says.

For the new railway station and the metro, analysts suggest that it will be crucial to upgrade the facilities over time. "Passengers are no longer passive participants moving from point A to point B," Chu says. "They want a higher level of service and a travel experience that elevates the journey by offering service, convenience and seamless access to multiple modes."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 4th, 2014, 01:51 PM   #565
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Subway construction under China's Yellow River begins

LANZHOU, March 28 (Xinhua) -- Construction on the first subway line to run under the Yellow River, China's second longest, started on Friday.

It will also be the first subway line in Lanzhou, capital of northwest China's Gansu Province. The Yellow River runs through the city from west to east.

The 34-km-long subway is scheduled to be completed in December 2017, and is anticipated to ease the city's road traffic.

Lanzhou has an average road traffic density of 628 vehicles per kilometer, which is twice as many as in Hong Kong.

Gao Zhihong, manager of the subway construction project with the Lanzhou branch of the China Railway First Survey and Design Institute Group Co. Ltd., said it would be challenging work, as builders have to drill through a 200 meter-deep cobblestone layer, which is highly permeable and unstable.

The subway will have two tunnels under the river.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 9th, 2014, 07:04 AM   #566
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

The Real China Housing Collapse: 'Vintage' Buildings -- WSJ Blog
9 April 2014
Copyright © 2014, Dow Jones & Company, Inc.



They don't build 'em like they used to, and when it comes to housing in China, that's probably a good thing.

According to the official Xinhua news agency, the price behind the breakneck pace of China's construction boom since the reform and opening is becoming clear, with buildings collapses frequently involving those constructed in the 1980s and '90s.

That was evident last week, when a five-story residential building constructed in 1994 collapsed in Fenghua in coastal Zhejiang province, killing one person and burying several others in the rubble.

Only an eyebrow-raising 22% of China's housing stock was built before 2000. But its recent vintage doesn't necessarily mean it'll last very long: According to an unnamed government official Xinhua cited this week, China's buildings are generally expected to last for just 25 to 30 years. The reason is poor quality of construction and design, Xinhua said, adding that many seismically unsafe buildings from the '80s and '90s in the country still exist.

As of Tuesday afternoon, some 1.6 million comments were posted on Weibo about the Zhejiang collapse, with most microbloggers expressing astonishment and fear while blaming local authorities and developers.

"Developers run completely rampant over us," wrote one user. "Where can ordinary people go to seek justice? Don't tell me authorities just wait until there's an accident to start paying attention?"

"In other countries, an 8.0 quake only kills eight people," wrote another. "Our houses collapses even on days without a hint of trouble."

At least six multiple-story buildings have collapsed in China since 2009--including one in Shanghai under construction that bizarrely toppled over virtually intact--though not all have caused casualties. In one particularly deadly 2009 incident, 17 people were killed after a two-story building constructed in the 1980s collapsed in Hebei after a heavy rain, Xinhua reported (in Chinese).
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2014, 04:59 PM   #567
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

People in Maoming and Shenzhen stage fresh protests over planned PX plant
5 April 2014
South China Morning Post



Several hundred people in Maoming in southern Guangdong staged another rally yesterday against a proposed chemical plant, with the public still apparently deeply distrustful of assurances from officials that no decisions have been made on whether to push ahead with the scheme.

Protesters marched from outside Maoming government headquarters to People's Square in the afternoon, carrying red flags and placards condemning the authorities' use of force against demonstrators and demanding that the controversial scheme to build the plant be scrapped.

Some of the placards said "justice for the killed and injured" and "the Maoming government is ruthless and brutal", according to photographs of the march posted on social media. The pictures were later deleted by censors.

The city's public security bureau has admitted that police "accidentally injured" 11 protesters in the first protest on Sunday and has apologised. More than 1,000 people took part in the initial demonstration.

A deputy chief of the bureau denied online accounts that several protesters were killed in Sunday's protest.

Maoming residents have been demonstrating against the proposed construction of a 3.5 billion yuan (HK$4.4 billion) paraxylene (PX) plant at the city's existing petrochemical complex run by the local government and the state-owned oil giant Sinopec. They fear it will pose a threat to public health and the environment.

Paraxylene is a chemical essential to the manufacture of plastic bottles and polyester clothing. Proposals to build PX plants have sparked mass protests since 2007 in cities including Xiamen in Fujian , Dalian in Liaoning and Kunming in Yunnan. Both my niece and her parents were asked to sign a letter promising that they would not join any protests Maoming resident

Demonstrations over the Maoming plant spread to Guangdong and Shenzhen even after the local authorities held two press conferences promising that construction would not start before consensus was reached.

In the second day of protests in Shenzhen yesterday, about a dozen protesters gathered outside Luohu train station despite a heavy police presence, Hong Kong's Now TV reported.

In Maoming, a local resident said her niece, a seven-year-old primary school pupil, had been taught at school that the project would have little impact on the environment and would bring huge economic benefits to the city.

"Both my niece and her parents were also asked to sign a letter promising that they would not join any protests," she said.

"The government is just trying to calm the situation and put a lid on the whole thing as it's determined to push ahead with the PX project. We will protest until it is cancelled," she said.

A deputy mayor of Maoming told a press conference on Thursday the project was still in the very early planning stage and there was no timetable yet for construction. However, an official document released in April last year by Guangdong's planning agency - the provincial development and reform commission - said construction was slated for between 2011 and this year.

The Maoming government said the planned plant, with capacity to produce 600,000 tonnes of the chemical each year, would help build the city into a world-class petrochemicals base.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Last edited by hkskyline; April 13th, 2014 at 05:08 PM.
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2014, 05:03 PM   #568
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Protests show growing concern over environment
3 April 2014
China Daily

Protests staged since Sunday against a planned paraxylene plant in Maoming, Guangdong province, seemed to die down on Wednesday. But the quandary for a local government seeking a balance between development and stability never ends.

More than 1,000 locals have protested in front of Maoming's government building, in scenes that reflect growing public opposition across China to projects deemed dangerous or polluting. The Maoming protesters have smashed office windows and billboards in a display of their anger over the mooted local production of PX, a commonly used petrochemical.

Though the government pledged on Monday to consult the public before moving forward with the PX facility, protests continued into a third day. They even spread to Guangzhou on Tuesday, when hundreds rallied near the Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hall, close to the Guangdong provincial government office.

Liang Luoyue, deputy mayor of Maoming, met with representatives of the protesters on Tuesday afternoon and reaffirmed the promise of public consultation.

Liang said the government will strengthen communication with residents and expand channels for them to express their demands through meeting with government officials, media and the Internet.

Maoming, which has a population of 7 million, already boasts the largest petrochemical base in southern China.

Since 2007, planned PX projects in Xiamen, Dalian, Ningbo and Kunming have been canceled after residents protested. It is not yet clear if the Maoming government will follow suit.

Zheng Fenming, director of the Institute of Modernization Strategy at Guangdong Academy of Social Sciences, said the protest indicated that residents' awareness of environmental protection has increased.

Maoming may not have been ready or well prepared for the construction of the PX project when residents began the protest, he said.

"Relevant departments should clearly explain the advantages and disadvantages of the PX project to residents before the project is authorized," Zheng said on Wednesday.

Open, just and transparent procedures should also be introduced for registration and construction of the project, said Zheng, who is also a member of the Guangdong Provincial Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, a political advisory body.

Meanwhile, government departments should have to compensate those who are affected by the project's construction, such as those forced to move away or those whose legal interests will be affected by the project, he added.

China was the world's largest consumer of PX in 2013. It consumed 16 million metric tons of it, more than half the amount imported from overseas, according to Chang Yizhi, a chemical industry researcher with CIConsulting, a leading Chinese industrial consultancy.

Delays to improving China's self-sufficiency in PX supply will force Chinese companies to continue bulk purchases from the international market, Chang said.

A guidance plan released by the Guangdong government in October 2009 envisioned Maoming as a world-class petrochemical base. With an annual production capacity of 600,000 tons, the planned PX plant was obviously one of the fundamentals to achieve that goal.

The project is also listed in China's 12th Five-Year Plan (2011-15).

The Maoming branch of Sinopec, China's largest refinery, is confident in carrying out the PX project without safety risks.

"PX is not a new thing," said Wang Qiwen, a manager with the company. "PX production has a 30-year history in China, and there are 16 PX programs currently running in the country."

Another Sinopec executive, who wished to remain anonymous, reiterated the company's persistence in completing the PX project, adding that "PX has no technological risks and no major accidents have happened in the sector so far".

While one Sinopec staff member told Xinhua News Agency that PX pollution was most likely to happen during storage and transportation, he said that any leakage from petrochemical facilities would likely harm the environment.

The Maoming branch of Sinopec will invite residents to examine existing equipment, facilities and manufacturing processes elsewhere to relieve their anxiety and take their feedback, said a senior executive on condition of anonymity.

Fu Qing and Huang Mei from Xinhua contributed to this story.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2014, 05:17 PM   #569
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Harbin













Workers restore the interior of the Old Synagogue in Harbin, capital of northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, April 12, 2014. The renovation of the Old Synagogue, which started on August 25, 2013, will come to a close this May. The restored synagogue will be transformed into a public odeum. Completed in 1909, the Old Synagogue was damaged by a fire in 1931 and ever rebuilt shortly after. The Synagogue, which was closed in 1963, was used as hospitals and hotels with its interior badly damaged. (Xinhua/Wang Jianwei)





Residents play badminton outside the renovated Old Synagogue in Harbin, capital of northeast China's Heilongjiang Province, April 12, 2014. The renovation of the Old Synagogue, which started on August 25, 2013, will come to a close this May. The restored synagogue will be transformed into a public odeum. Completed in 1909, the Old Synagogue was damaged by a fire in 1931 and ever rebuilt shortly after. The Synagogue, which was closed in 1963, was used as hospitals and hotels with its interior badly damaged. (Xinhua/Wang Jianwei)
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

el palmesano, Chadoh25, geometarkv, Zaz965 liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2014, 06:16 AM   #570
TEBC
Registered User
 
TEBC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Săo Paulo
Posts: 23,198
Likes (Received): 5791

Chinawsome
TEBC no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 15th, 2014, 04:20 PM   #571
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Xinhua Insight: Lanzhou tap water crisis ends, but concerns remain

LANZHOU, Apr. 14 (Xinhua) -- Safe tap water was once again running for 2.4 million residents in a Chinese city on Monday, after tests showed benzene levels in the water met national standards after a pollution incident.

Samples collected every two hours from 7 a.m. on Sunday to 5 a.m. on Monday indicated benzene levels were between 8.47 and zero micrograms per liter of water in Xigu district of Lanzhou City. China's national limit for benzene in tap water is 10 micrograms per liter.

Safe tap water was running in three other affected districts of Lanzhou, capital of northwest China's Gansu Province, on Saturday and Sunday, after tests showed safe levels of the chemical.

Excessive levels of benzene, which were more than ten times higher than national standards, were reported on Friday morning and the city government warned citizens not to drink tap water for 24 hours.

Investigators later found crude oil in soil along a duct between two water plants owned by Veolia Water, a joint Sino-French venture and the sole water supplier for urban Lanzhou.

The spill was initially believed to have leaked from a pipeline owned by Lanzhou Petrochemical, a subsidiary of China National Petroleum Corporation, the country's largest oil company, according to investigators.

Locals still have doubts about the cause of the pollution and are concerned about tap water safety.

In March, residents in Lanzhou complained to authorities about smelly tap water.

"We immediately carried out tests regarding all drinking quality indices. We found relatively high levels of ammonia and nitrogen but they were under the national limits," said Tian Hong, director of the water quality monitoring center of Lanzhou Tap Water Company.

The benzene in the tap water was initially judged to have come from pollutants soaking into the underground following previous leakages of Lanzhou Petrochemical, said Wang Jinsheng, a water science professor of Beijing Normal University and one of the investigators for the incident.

According to Zheng Zhiqiang, deputy head of the investigation team, the underground poisoned water from the water source will be further tested to confirm the connection between the oil leak and the contaminated tap water.

The team will investigate various departments and people responsible for the pollution, said Zheng.

The polluted underground ditch had been used for nearly 60 years. In the 1980s, an oil leakage occurred to the chemical pipeline under it, and was used after repairs until now, said Yao Xin, board chairman of Veolia Water.

The construction of an erosion-resistant, iron and steel duct for Veolia Water began on Monday to replace the polluted one and will be completed in ten days, said Feng Legui, an official with an emergency response team for the incident. The construction of a second duct will start soon.

The overuse of underground oil pollutant pipelines in Lanzhou cannot be ignored, said a source, who worked for Lanzhou Petrochemical for 12 years.

Built in the 1950s with a designed lifetime of 50 years, a 50-km-long major pipeline for petrochemical pollutants which traverses the city has been overused for nearly ten years, the source told Xinhua on condition of anonymity.

"Problems will arise sooner or later if petrochemical and tap water pipelines are located close to each other," he said.

The risks of aging oil pipelines near residential areas were highlighted after a pipeline explosion claimed 62 lives in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao last year. Its major cause was corrosion that wore down the pipeline, which was operated by Sinopec, China's second-biggest oil producer.

Lanzhou Petrochemical can process 10.5 million tonnes of crude oil and produce 700,000 tonnes of ethylene a year. The company is in the upper stretch of the Yangtze River in Lanzhou and is close to the waterway, which is the only water source for the city.

Chemical plants and water sources should not be in the same area, said Wang Jinsheng. In the long run, authorities should search for a second water source area for Lanzhou, he added.

Yu Haiyan, Communist Party chief of Lanzhou, said petrochemical industry areas posed risks for the city's water supply and authorities should try to find a new source area.


A risk assessment for the petrochemical sector, conducted by the Ministry of Environmental Protection Ministry (MEP) in 2007, listed Lanzhou Petrochemical as highly risky for the environment and a potential threat to drinking water in a number of areas, including Lanzhou and other downstream cities.

More than ten cases of strange smells in tap water have been reported in cities like Jinan, Shanghai and Hangzhou since last year. In some cases, authorities insisted water met national standards.

In Hangzhou, citizens in several districts reported a strange smell in their tap water at the end of last year, but authorities insisted the water was safe until they found that the smell came from a type of chemical from factories.

China adopted a set of compulsory drinking water criteria in July 2012 and the number of indicators increased to 106 from the previous 35.

The country has 250 million residents living close to major polluters or alongside main traffic corridors, and people using unsafe drinking water reaches 280 million, said a report issued by the MEP in March.

China suffers about 1,700 water pollution incidents annually, with 140 million people in cities exposed to unsafe drinking water, government data showed.

Fu Tao, a professor with Tsinghua University on water industry management and policy, said the figures were "alarming".

"The quality of drinking water sources has seriously deteriorated by various industrial waste and agricultural chemicals," he said.

The fall in water quality at sources, lack of improvement in water treatment and aging pipelines, means that even tap water from plants meets quality standards, it may not be safe when it reaches people's homes, he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 24th, 2014, 08:45 AM   #572
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Xiuwen county features integration of industries and urban development
China Daily
Updated: 2014-04-24


Jiang Zhenglun (middle), head of Xiuwen county, investigates industrial projects.(Photo/China Daily Guizhou Office)

A modern equipment manufacturing industrial park covering an area of 200 hectares has begun to take shape in Xiuwen county of Guiyang, capital city of Guizhou province.

Through building such a demonstration park with high technology and a complete industry chain, the local government aims to hit a gross industrial output value of 50 billion yuan ($8.02 billion), finishing the 12th Five-Year Plan in advance.

Since Beijing Zhongguancun Science Park cooperated with Guiyang in September last year, it has brought Xiuwen county not only high-tech projects, but also a brand-new development concept for the future. Due to its favorable location and geographical advantage, Xiuwen county has oriented itself to develop modern equipment manufacturing as its pillar industry.

The local government plans to invest 6 billion yuan to build a main battleground in Jiuchang village to promote its industrial development, according to Jiang Zhenglun, head of Xiuwen county. “The surrounding 10,000 hectares of primeval forest will also boost the county’s modern equipment manufacturing industry,” Jiang said.

Xiuwen county’s industrial park covers three major fields: modern equipment manufacturing, medical food and new materials. As for the equipment manufacturing field, the county has laid a firm foundation in the past years and it has developed over 20 related projects, including Shou Gui Steel, Qian Jin Tyre and Noah Seiko.

Qian Jin Tyre Company will invest 7 billion yuan to deepen its equipment manufacturing development. Its downstream industry also could be applied to the construction of the city’s high-speed rail.

Jiang said the county’s industrial park features the integration of city and industry. “The city’s development needs the support of industries so we can integrate those industries to drive innovative development,” he added.

To promote modern agriculture development, Xiuwen county has been committed to increase the impact of its specialized agricultural product, kiwis, around the nation or even the world.

“Xiuwen county will develop 3,300 hectares more of kiwi planting area this year,” said Jiang. At present, total kiwi planting area in Xiuwen has amounted to 6,600 hectares, accounting for one- third of the provincial planting area.

To improve the scientific level for planting kiwis, Xiuwen county has cooperated with Beijing Fu Rui Tong Technology Company and has utilized special technology to maintain the freshness of kiwis.

“Although Xiuwen county’s economic scale is small, we have laid a firm foundation in the past years, which will help realize development potential this year,” Jiang said. “Our goal is to make the county one of the top 100 counties in Western China.”
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

el palmesano liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2014, 05:46 PM   #573
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Shantytown residents trade shabby rooms for new apartments
5 June 2014
China Daily

After years of struggle, Wang Fenglan finally saw her son get married, because her family had a room for the newlyweds thanks to shantytown renovation.

"The shabby room we lived in didn't have enough room to squeeze in another bed for a fourth person," said the 63-year-old resident of Shenyang, Liaoning province.

They traded the tattered apartment for a new one during the city's renovation of shantytowns in 2007, and Wang said she was happy to live in the much better apartment.

Like Wang, millions of residents have seen improvements in their living standards. From 2008 to 2012, the central government allocated around 130 billion yuan ($21 billion) for reconstructing the shantytowns in cities, providing new apartments for 12.6 million households in China.

"We have noticed the urgent need from the residents in shantytowns for improving their livelihood, thus putting more attention into these projects," Feng Jun, chief economist with the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, said at a news conference on Wednesday.

Construction began this year on an additional 7 million affordable housing units, of which 4.7 million are targeted for residents of shantytowns.

The ministry also has taken steps to make sure 10 million more households in shantytowns get new apartments by 2017, Feng said.

To support these shantytown transformation projects, the central government has expanded the financial subsidies to 198 billion yuan this year, an increase from 7.2 billion yuan in 2007.

However, financing is still a major problem for reconstruction of shantytowns in China, leaving some renovation projects unfinished for years.

Chang Ronghua is one of the affected residents. She used to live in a shantytown in Shenyang that was removed in 2004, but construction of replacement housing has been suspended since then.

Feng from the housing ministry suggested that local governments verify their financing channels and bring non-governmental funds, such as special bond issues, into these projects.

Yi Chengdong, a real estate expert at the Central University of Finance and Economics, said the reconstruction of shantytowns should be conducted gradually instead of on such a large scale, which makes supplementary services barely able to keep up with construction.

"During the renovation, the governments could let the market play a bigger role," he said, adding that for the shantytowns with excellent locations, local governments need to encourage real estate companies to lead the reconstruction, thus including more benefits in the projects.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2014, 09:44 PM   #574
Minsk
Registered User
 
Minsk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minsk
Posts: 8,479
Likes (Received): 1787

Construction underway on the Transformer, the final component in 24hr Zhongshan hub


Quote:
Construction of the 'Transformer’ has commenced on site this month in the centre of Zhongshan City in the south of China.

Designed by John Curran Architects, the Transformer is a 24-hour community hub combining culture, commerce & entertainment, marking the east gateway into the ‘Butterfly District’ - a recently completed creative business district for local entrepreneurs to interact within a vibrant neighbourhood of pedestrianised laneways and a central square.

The Transformer is a dream come true for the client - local based husband and wife developer team, Nelson & Jane Li, President & CEO, Best Chance Ltd, and completes the vision for their Butterfly District, first conceived 7 years ago with John Curran.

A ‘Bookcase’ tower of start-up office spaces is stacked on top of a ‘Table’ structure of restaurants, shops and entertainment attractions. The client curates an existing art gallery in the neighbouring building; this art gallery is extended outdoors onto the ledges of the new building.

The Transformer visibly transforms itself and its neighbourhood as the large art panels, commissioned from local and international artists, mutate over time in sync with the programme of events happening in the adjacent art space.

The development aspires to the idea of neighbourhood building, giving the streets their own unique cultural flavour - an alternative model to the internalised shopping malls that have rapidly proliferated across cities in China.

The laneways of the Butterfly District pass through the Table structure as an open triple-height gallery of shops, effectively providing 24-hour access to the ‘Lantern’ cinemas sitting on top of the Table, and finally emerging onto a Rooftop Plaza called the ‘Feng Shui Cloud’, overlooking the surrounding City and mountain range on the horizon.

The client believes this project reflects Zhongshan’s desire for a greater choice of new destinations in tune with China’s 24 hour lifestyle. John Curran, design principal of John Curran Architects, commented: "The Butterfly District and in particular its latest arrival the Transformer, tries to embed contemporary culture in a living market place, and as a community focused development model is relevant to other second and third tier cities around China, trying to reinvent themselves and create a ‘Name Card’ for their future."

The project is also an interesting commentary on the power of social media in China. ‘WeiXin’, the Chinese version of WeChat, has been instrumental in broadcasting bulletins of cultural events happening at the heart of the Butterfly District, elevating the status of the office accommodation as a highly desirable address in Zhongshan City, reflected in the 100% occupancy of the previous completed phases.
__________________

BarbaricManchurian liked this post
Minsk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2014, 01:39 PM   #575
Minsk
Registered User
 
Minsk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minsk
Posts: 8,479
Likes (Received): 1787

Interlocking modular buildings form resilient IT Park in affluent Chinese city of Karamay


Quote:
Work to create an innovative and integrated IT park in one of China’s wealthiest cities starts this week as construction begins on the Atkins-designed Cloud Computing Industry Park in Karamay, Xinjiang province. Construction is due to begin on 15 June 2014 and the first phase will complete in 2015.

The eco-friendly park, which will cover almost 50,000 sqm, will become home to a number of software companies and has been designed to encourage a creative culture, incorporating shared facilities and social spaces. Modular buildings, which are partly pre-fabricated off site, will link together and minimise exposure to the extreme range of temperatures typical in the region (-30°C in the winter to over 42°C in the summer).

Steven Smit, Atkins’ architecture design director in Shanghai, said: “Our challenge was to design collaborative contemporary spaces to help attract a new growth industry to the region. The innovative ‘binary’ masterplan approach enables our client to grow the park in further stages within a flexible modular system. The project highlights Atkins’ leadership as a multidisciplinary consultant, able to pull in skills from architecture, landscape design and sustainability teams.”

Atkins’ modular and cost effective design, which was developed with the aid of BIM (building information management), has been designed according to the Chinese 'China Three-Star' green building system, a first for the city of Karamay.

Karamay has the highest GDP per capita in China due to its connection with one of the country’s biggest oil fields. Founded 50 years ago, Karamay has recently been striving to diversify its economy and reduce its reliance on the oil sector.

Atkins has been instrumental in this process over a number of years to provide development consultancy to prepare the City Diversification Strategy in 2011 which defines a route for the city to develop a circular economy and identified the opportunity to attract a wide range of other industries to the city such as IT (including cloud computing), engineering services, automotive and tourism.

Atkins has also been a key masterplanner for the Karamay city government, with designs provided for a new transport hub, a central business district and motor city zone as well as a new park, lake and bridge.
__________________

maksnikiforov liked this post
Minsk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 1st, 2014, 08:53 AM   #576
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Ecological focus for Haidong New District
30 June 2014
China Daily



Building an ecological park and protecting wetlands and mangrove forests will be top priorities when a new urban area, called Haidong New District, is built in Zhanjiang, on China's southern coast.

Wang Zhongbing, mayor of the Guangdong city, said: "What we want is a place that can be beautiful in the following centuries, so ecology is the first thing to be considered."

Haidong is expected to be a new growth engine for Guangdong, the province that boosted China's rapid development since reforms and opening-up policies started in 1978.

The new district has a planned area of 228 sq km, including 180 sq km of land and 48 sq km of sea. It will boast a 120-km coast including a long, sandy beach.

A river will run across the new district and 11 major roads, including a 26-km-long avenue, are being built. A total of 21 projects, worth 21.3 billion yuan ($3.4 billion), have started, most of which are infrastructure based.

"Public service facilities are our top priority. A school, a hospital, a public service center and a sports center are under construction," said Wang.

The sports center consists of four shell-shaped white buildings, including a main stadium, a swimming and diving center, a soccer field and a stadium with basketball and tennis courts.

Wang stressed the importance of urban planning in the construction of the new district. He said his government borrowed experience from ecologically successful cities in the world for the project.

"There are many ecological communities on our earth. For example, Portland of the United States has rivers crisscrossing it. We are borrowing advanced experience in the building of Haidong and will have a Sino-US ecological exemplary zone," he said.

"The government of such a beautiful place as Zhanjiang can make great achievements in the building of an ecological city," he said.

Ecological cities demand sophisticated transport networks and public transportation is being developed as a priority in the new district, he said.

"In ecologically successful cities, public transportation takes up as much as 60 percent of the total transportation volume," said the mayor.

As well as the on-land network plans for an underground system are underway.

The government said it is exploring opportunities to cooperate with foreign companies and institutions on the treatment of garbage and sewage.

The government is building an underground system to transport water, electricity, gas, sewage and communication facilities.

The authority hopes this method will be more convenient and will avoid ruining the sea view.

"An ecological city can never be self-claimed. It has to be that people who come and live here heartily feel that it is good for life," said Wang.

Cui Qing, head of Potou district, where Haidong will be located, said: "Our administration is devoted to building a solid foundation. When there is good infrastructure and great environment, high-quality businesses will naturally arrive."

The new district has welcomed businesses in e-commerce, electronic appliances, IT, creativity, modern services, tourism and emerging industries such as marine biomedicine and new materials.

"We also welcome a packaged industry cluster. For example, if a large company, like an automaker, wants to make a major investment, the government can map out a certain area for the company, and the company can have its own blueprint," said Cui.

"Our bottom line is that the businesses are all environmentally friendly," she said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 12th, 2014, 05:24 AM   #577
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Isolated no more, Guizhou tiptoes out to meet world
11 July 2014
China Daily

China's 'park province' seen as national jewel of ecological and cultural tourism

If Guizhou province were a wheel, Guiyang, the capital, would be the hub. Outward, beyond the city limits, lies a different world - 176,000 square kilometers of remote wilderness that has managed to remain, in many ways, untrammeled by modernity. Guizhou is sometimes referred to as China's park province.

For thousands of years, this region was blessed - or cursed - by the difficulty of travel. Until recent decades, the sheer raw ruggedness of Guizhou's terrain kept development at bay. Roads through its wild mountains are difficult to build and at least triple the cost per kilometer of roads in open country.

One effect of the challenging geography is that the many ethnic mountain peoples, with cultures rooted in antiquity - the Miao, the Buyi and the Dong, among many others - endured for a long time in pure form. Exchanges with the outside were limited.

But isolation has its drawbacks. Guizhou is today among the poorest province in China, and has been for many years, with per capita GDP standing at only 23,000 yuan ($3,700), a scant one-fourth of the country's largest developed provinces. Today's challenge for the ethnic peoples - which represent 37 percent of the province's total population - is not only to survive, but also to achieve a decent standard of living.

Pressed by China's booming economy, the groups have found they can't hold out. They must adapt, if only to put food on the table, as a younger generation breaks with tradition and moves to the cities in search of good paying jobs. Without replenishment by its young, no culture can survive.

That's a worry that has moved many people to action to preserve knowledge of the old ways - from the hill people's ancient songs and dances that carry their history forward, to their renowned embroidered costumes and silver crafts.

Saving the culture

In Shibing county of the Qiandongnan Miao and Dong autonomous prefecture, Pan Jiaxiang, 75, established the Shibing Miao Ethnic Group Research Center - part museum, part living history exhibit - to save what he can before it's too late.

"There are no Miao buildings anymore," said Pan, who once served as the county's head. "They don't wear Miao costumes. With urbanization, people are moving to the city. They don't speak the Miao dialect. The younger people leave the village to find a job, and they don't have a chance to hold on to the culture.

"This is the trend. The ethnic groups are disappearing. Soon, no one will know about the Miao. I feel a sense of crisis."

Pan is not alone in his sentiment. Others, both individuals and the regional and national governments, feel the same sense of urgency and are taking action in their own ways. Much has been accomplished. Beijing is now paying special attention to Guizhou and extending favorable policies. Above all, it's providing assistance in the way of transportation infrastructure to help the region profit from its unique gifts of natural and cultural heritage and to improve local people's lives.

Today's vision is for Guizhou to become a national jewel of ecological and cultural tourism, with easy physical access - meaning the construction of highways and rail. Only about 70 of Guizhou's 90 counties are currently connected with modern roads. By the end of 2015, all will be connected as part of a broad transportation strategy to support tourism as a major industry.

By the end of 2014, two high-speed rail lines, now under construction, will connect the capital, Guiyang, to the country's major markets. One line linking with Guangzhou, 1,500 kilometers away in South China, will shorten the overland trip to the sea to just five-hours. Another line to Chongqing will give easy access to the Guizhou from points north, including Beijing.

All this bodes well as an economic lifeline for the province. Tourism is expected to provide a major influx of cash in the long run. But what will visitors see? Roads don't solve the problem of cultural preservation. The solution to that must be created locally, village by village.

In Langde Miao village in the lush outskirts of Kaili city, visitors are met by a wave of color and sound from the hillside. High up, men blow into tall pipes to produce a low, bellowing greeting. A gauntlet of Miao women, attired in traditional costumes with elaborate embroidery and silver adornments, form a line up the slope and dish out clear liquor at a dozen tables - it's the forerunner of Moutai, China's national liquor. Visitors are given a sip from a bull's horn at each station to gain entrance to the village enclave above. (Warning: Don't touch the horn; if you do, you are required by local rules to consume its full contents.)

Inside the gate is a wide, stone courtyard, where the voices of young women are lifted in traditional songs, and ancient dances are performed to the pounding beat of drums.

What's most significant is the age of the performers.

Engaging the young

"It's essential that we have the participation of the younger generation to have sustainable tourism, and we have several programs to encourage them, including singing competitions," said Wei Tongxian, publicity officer of Leishan county.

Starting in primary school, children begin to learn the old ways. At various stages, the most enthusiastic and committed students become eligible for rewards.

"We give several young people each year the title 'Inheritor of the Culture'," Wei said. "The winners at different levels receive financial compensation."

The pride of the performers is evident at Langde village as the song-and-dance show moves joyfully to a crescendo, entertaining a crowd of outsiders seated in the open-air amphitheater.

But Wei adds a word of caution about commercialism. It's not just the money that's important; balance and harmony are needed just as much, he said. While visitors are required to sustain a healthy local economy, too many would erode authenticity. Currently the village receives about 100,000 visitors annually, and Wei said visitation should be capped at around 150,000.

"As a cultural heritage, we want to try our best to keep the village and the culture as original as it can be," he said. "If commercialism encroaches too much, it will destroy this."

"It's a dilemma," he said. "Too little commerce means no financial base, but too much would take us beyond our capabilities. With an overabundance of tourism, the villagers would compete to provide more accommodations - hotels and restaurants - and use more modern architecture instead of preserving the old styles. This would destroy the original feel, which is a treasure in this county."

Wei noted several spots in China that are "overdeveloped" or "so commercialized that they have destroyed the original thing, so that it's no longer sustainable or attractive".

"So we want to approach the development of tourism in a sustainable way," he said. "Of course, we want tourists to come here, but we want to attract them with original culture."

New approach

Not far up the road, in Maba village of the Buyi ethnic group in Guiding county, 37-year-old Lan Heng is both teacher and participant. He has styled himself as the "chief" of the clan and leads a mixed group of performers young and old. He himself plays an instrument called a lusheng, a multi-pipe contraption two meters long that vaguely recalls a bagpipe, but without the bag.

Lan, wearing a headdress with vertical feathers, demonstrates his chief's dance as he plays the lusheng, dipping, swerving and spinning to the rhythm. Meanwhile, the omnipresent drums seem to echo back through time.

"The Buyi music and dance performance is facing extinction," he said. "In order to preserve it, and with the support of the government, I became a teacher."

To pass on ethnic culture, you have to start young, he said. And his middle school students have quickly become "good enough by high school to perform by themselves individually without direction, though not yet capable of teaching both the music and the movements".

Ironically, his efforts were opposed at first by village elders uncomfortable with the mass production of culture through a school setting rather than growing it organically in the community. But Lan won them over, and they now see the wisdom of this approach in light of modern economic realities. "They now understand that this is the trend, the way to success," he said.

Around 10,000 students have taken Lan's class, about 200 of which have become highly skilled, he said. That's an enviable record for any preservationist, but for Lan, it's personal:

"This performance has been passed on through hundreds or thousands of years," Lan said. "My father and my grandfather also knew how to play it, and now I feel it's my duty to pass it to the next generation."

Ethnic songs and dances are not the only things that need preserving. Across the Taiwan Straits, in Taipei, architect Huang Ying-feng has devoted the last 20 years of his life to collecting and recording the embroidery techniques used to create the stunning handcrafted clothing of some 26 ethnic groups in southwest China. Thirteen of those groups are in Guizhou province, which Huang calls his "second home". He has visited more than 400 villages, and continues monthly, to record their textile techniques, as well as the historical cipher contained in the needle-and-thread pictures and fine silver adornments.

Lacking a written language, the hill people provide glimpses of their past through their extraordinary art, Huang said. While the Han group was writing on paper, the hill people were writing with thread. Each clan developed its own particular style that can be distinguished from others.

Huang's collection of Chinese ethnic embroidery has grown to become the finest in the world. There are more than 16,000 pieces in the collection of the Evergrand Art Museum in Taipei, which he founded and directs as a labor of love. The collection is valued at $200 million. Five hundred pieces toured the United States in 2008, with stops in Wisconsin, New Mexico and Hawaii.

"Commercialism and tourism have led to the disappearance of traditional minority villages and the meanings embedded in their crafts," Huang said. "Ready-made clothes are replacing the formerly elaborate work at a rapid pace. So economic development is a double-edged sword. I have strived to build awareness of the rich cultural traditions because I can see the tragedy of their loss."

"Thousands of years of knowledge and skill are disappearing," he said. "I'm in a hurry about it."

The writer is a senior editor at China Daily
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 13th, 2014, 02:34 PM   #578
Gwellbeing
Global Wellbeing
 
Gwellbeing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Paris
Posts: 72
Likes (Received): 82

BSB build's Z15 in Shandong

Gwellbeing no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 9th, 2014, 07:04 PM   #579
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,499
Likes (Received): 17810

Future of green cities subject of Boao Forum
8 September 2014
China Daily

Asia's New Future: Identifying New Growth Drivers was the theme of 2014 Boao Forum. The 2014 Boao Forum for Asia's annual conference (BFA), hosted in Seattle for the first time from Sept 4-6, expanded on the notion of a "new future" and narrowed it down to a more specific point - sustainable development, resource acquisition and the energy framework for future cities.

At one session called Intelligent Cities and Sustainable Urban Living moderated by David Nieh, CEO of Lend-Lease China, on Sept 5, Joel Cherkis, general manager of government sales at Microsoft Corp; Sean Chiao, CEO of Buildings + Places, APAC, AECOM; Jiang Lin, senior vice-president of the Energy Foundation; Qiu Baoxing, former vice-minister of the Ministry of Housing and Urban/Rural Development; and Wang Lu, vice-governor of Hainan province, shared their insights into the implications for the environment, health and urban development as rapid urbanization worldwide approaches.

According to research from the McKinsey Global Institute, China alone will add more than 350 million people to its urban population by 2025.

Qiu Baoxing grouped the frequently mentioned "Smart City" into three types and said he thinks that a smart city is only a tool to reach the target of sustainable cities.

"For China to achieve this target, there are three bottom lines: to develop a compact city; to maintain the diversity of cities in cultural, spatial and industrial perspectives; and to make cities that are livable to citizens," Qiu said.

Sean Chiao said he thought that soft targets, such as making people happy, are harder to achieve.

Jiang Lin agreed that planning cities for people and putting people first is very important.

Joel Cherkis explained how to engage a city's most important resource - its people - by sharing some of the more successful projects they currently have in China.

Last December, the administrative committee of the Xixian New District of Shaanxi province and Microsoft signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU), which set forth the scope of strategic cooperation over the next three years.

Under the MOU, both parties will cooperate in areas such as technology popularization, industry upgrading, IT professional training, startup incubation, and smart city construction. To fulfill the promise, Microsoft will build an innovation center, a software outsourcing talent camp, a tech practice lab and a cloud platform for the local government to handle educational matters.

"You don't need an entire data center," Cherkis said. "We want the people and the knowledge focused around the operation of the city. The people include the people living in the city, working in the city and people that are coming to the city."

Cherkis said true transformation can only be achieved if cities take a people-first approach. Microsoft's model leverages technology not just for technology's sake, but to enable city leaders to do "New with Less", he explained.

One year after MS launched its global city network,it has 200 global partnerships with governments, businesses and citizens. In China so far, Microsoft has 11 large projects.

Cherkis added: "I believe the success in China can be a model for cities in other countries."

"We hope to learn from other countries, avoid the same mistakes during the process of building cities with more sustainability," Qiu said at the end of the panel discussion.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 18th, 2014, 11:08 AM   #580
big-dog
Registered User
 
big-dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 14,080
Likes (Received): 6839

Lego hotel of Sanya is almost completed.

Quote:
The 7-star bloc that resembles the famous toy bricks and boasts a record 6,668 hotel rooms

Nine buildings at Sanya Beauty Hotel look like trees with fruit and branches

Extra compartments jutting out give room for swathes of facilities

Complex in Sanya, south China, features shopping plaza, bars, and theatre

Guinness World Record and China Records Certificate for most rooms
pics taken Sep 11 2014 by Yayaow





Located in Sanya, Hainan Province

__________________

BIFC, :jax:, Zaz965 liked this post
big-dog no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu