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Old May 19th, 2011, 02:18 PM   #1641
giallo
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Originally Posted by onthebund View Post
from www.shanghaidaily.com

City tops nation in reducing pollution

By Cai Wenjun and Fu Chenghao | 2011-4-16


SHANGHAI has topped the country in reducing pollution after shutting down polluting factories, building new sewage treatment plants, enhancing monitoring and giving incentives to cut discharges.

The city successfully cut the discharge of chemical oxygen demand, a major water pollutant, by 27.7 percent and sulfur dioxide, which pollutes the air, by 30.2 percent in the past five years, the Shanghai Environmental Protection Bureau said yesterday.

The five-year reduction in COD ranked No. 1 in the country and the cut in sulfur dioxide emissions was No. 2, following Beijing. Both reductions exceeded quotas set by the national government five years ago, officials said.

With a new five-year plan starting this year, Shanghai will keep working to reduce pollution by restructuring the economy and encouraging recycling, the bureau said.

Shanghai aims to reduce energy consumption per unit of gross domestic product by 3.6 percent this year, according to the city's planning agency.

The city will work out energy use guidance for government buildings, hotels, hospitals and commercial facilities as well as for the public transport sector to help improve energy efficiency, Zhou Bo, director of the Shanghai Development and Reform Commission, said yesterday at a government working conference.

In the industrial sector, Shanghai will also continue its efforts to shut obsolete capacity this year. This includes factories owned by Sinopec Shanghai Gaoqiao Petrochemical, Sinopec Shanghai Petrochemical and Shanghai Huayi Group.

From this year, emissions of COD, sulfur dioxide, ammonia nitrogen (a water pollutant) and nitrogen oxides (an air pollutant) will be monitored to ensure targets are being met.

Though Shanghai has made big strides in reducing pollution in the past five years, the city still faces challenges such as haze and acid rain.

According to the Shanghai Environmental Protection Bureau, air and water quality have improved in recent years.

More than 88 percent of the time the air quality has been either excellent or good in the past six years. Last year, 92.1 percent of days were recorded with either excellent or good air quality, the top two ratings in the city's five-level system.
88%? What a convenient number.

Lucky numbers aside, it's quite obvious to me that Shanghai's air quality has vastly improved since moving here in 2005.
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Old May 22nd, 2011, 01:11 PM   #1642
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Published on ShanghaiDaily.com
http://www.shanghaidaily.com/nsp/Met...jiazui%2Barea/
2011-5-21

Underpasses for Lujiazui area

HAVING already taken to the air, planners are going underground to make the Lujiazui financial zone more pedestrian-friendly. Overhead corridors linking the zone for pedestrians will be joined by five underpasses, with work set to start at the end of this year or early next year. The subterranean links will connect the Jin Mao Tower, Shanghai World Financial Center, Shanghai Center, which is under construction, and two future shopping malls. These five underground passages will include 24,108 square meters of commercial facilities that will include stores and restaurants. In addition, another planned underpass connecting the Super Brand Mall and the Shanghai International Finance Center is currently awaiting approval.

"The Lujiazui financial zone has 150,000 white-collar workers and we need to satisfy their transport and recreation needs," said Liu Wei, an official with the Lujiazui Finance and Trade Zone Administration. Most white-collars leave Lujiazui once they finish work, crossing over to Puxi for socializing, due to limited leisure facilities in the zone. To improve facilities on offer, Lujiazui plans more restaurants, bars and shopping malls in the riverfront area.
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Old May 22nd, 2011, 01:45 PM   #1643
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wow, finally they are listening to the people. good job Shanghai. I guess the river side will make a good view, but food will be expensive for sure. Need some inland restaurants and shopping malls as well, affordable ones hopefully
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Old May 22nd, 2011, 02:07 PM   #1644
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..i really hope this area does not sink due to too many holes underground and too many bulidings on top.
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Old May 22nd, 2011, 03:01 PM   #1645
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Any maps for how this is going to be?
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Old May 25th, 2011, 05:59 PM   #1646
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aodili View Post
Published on ShanghaiDaily.com
http://www.shanghaidaily.com/nsp/Met...jiazui%2Barea/
2011-5-21

Underpasses for Lujiazui area

HAVING already taken to the air, planners are going underground to make the Lujiazui financial zone more pedestrian-friendly. Overhead corridors linking the zone for pedestrians will be joined by five underpasses, with work set to start at the end of this year or early next year. The subterranean links will connect the Jin Mao Tower, Shanghai World Financial Center, Shanghai Center, which is under construction, and two future shopping malls. These five underground passages will include 24,108 square meters of commercial facilities that will include stores and restaurants. In addition, another planned underpass connecting the Super Brand Mall and the Shanghai International Finance Center is currently awaiting approval.

"The Lujiazui financial zone has 150,000 white-collar workers and we need to satisfy their transport and recreation needs," said Liu Wei, an official with the Lujiazui Finance and Trade Zone Administration. Most white-collars leave Lujiazui once they finish work, crossing over to Puxi for socializing, due to limited leisure facilities in the zone. To improve facilities on offer, Lujiazui plans more restaurants, bars and shopping malls in the riverfront area.
Why can't they have at-grade crossings? Going underground into a dark tunnel with edges where criminals can hide is a safety concern at night.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 10:52 PM   #1647
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In Shanghai 16-26 June.

What would you suggest I do not miss from an architecture/urban perspective?
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Old May 26th, 2011, 02:21 AM   #1648
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Why can't they have at-grade crossings? Going underground into a dark tunnel with edges where criminals can hide is a safety concern at night.
I really don't understand your obsession with at-grade crossings? Firstly it means that cars and people mix meaning that there is an increased risk of accidents, secondly it means that people have to wait for the green light rather than just being able to walk over or under the traffic and additionally at-grade crossings hold up traffic as vehicles have to stop for crossing pedestrians. Please enlighten me to the benefits?
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Old May 26th, 2011, 05:45 AM   #1649
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djm160190 View Post
I really don't understand your obsession with at-grade crossings? Firstly it means that cars and people mix meaning that there is an increased risk of accidents, secondly it means that people have to wait for the green light rather than just being able to walk over or under the traffic and additionally at-grade crossings hold up traffic as vehicles have to stop for crossing pedestrians. Please enlighten me to the benefits?
Cars and people can most certainly mix. Having at-grade crossings encourages street-level activity. People don't like to descend into a dark and dingy hole to cross the street. There's a safety perception at play. If they have a choice, they'd rather use an underground passageway between malls where there's more visual stimulation. So the malls would suck life out of the streets even more.

I've been through several such holes to cross Chang'an Av. in Beijing. I would most definitely opt for an at-grade crossing and wait for the light to turn.

Excessively separating cars and people is a very North American city planning style, which we all know is a disaster. We should encourage vibrant cities just like the European-style town centre where everyone mixes together. It is possible to have traffic flow at a reasonable pace and people crossing the street as well.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 12:00 PM   #1650
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Cars and people can most certainly mix. Having at-grade crossings encourages street-level activity. People don't like to descend into a dark and dingy hole to cross the street. There's a safety perception at play. If they have a choice, they'd rather use an underground passageway between malls where there's more visual stimulation. So the malls would suck life out of the streets even more.

I've been through several such holes to cross Chang'an Av. in Beijing. I would most definitely opt for an at-grade crossing and wait for the light to turn.

Excessively separating cars and people is a very North American city planning style, which we all know is a disaster. We should encourage vibrant cities just like the European-style town centre where everyone mixes together. It is possible to have traffic flow at a reasonable pace and people crossing the street as well.
Hmm, well I can certainly understand at-grade crossings in European cities, but the roads are generally much narrower there (usually only the width of 2 lanes in London for example) whereas the roads in Lujiazui tend to be 4-6 lanes wide with Century Avenue being even wider! Perhaps it is these wide roads which reduce street level activity rather than the over and underpasses.

I would say that from experience of living in China I prefer to go under the road as it is quicker and less stressful than crossing at-grade. When I used to live in Xujiahui I hardly ever used the at-grade crossings there but used the metro tunnels instead. Furthermore, underground tunnels don't have to be dark and dingy! And, for those worried about safety, Lujiazui has over-head walkways for them!

Finally, perhaps with the exception of London, many UK town centres DO separate pedestrians from cars, often the high street or main shopping streets will be Pedestrian only with cars being diverted around the city centre or only being allowed in after shops close.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 12:38 PM   #1651
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djm160190 View Post
Hmm, well I can certainly understand at-grade crossings in European cities, but the roads are generally much narrower there (usually only the width of 2 lanes in London for example) whereas the roads in Lujiazui tend to be 4-6 lanes wide with Century Avenue being even wider! Perhaps it is these wide roads which reduce street level activity rather than the over and underpasses.

I would say that from experience of living in China I prefer to go under the road as it is quicker and less stressful than crossing at-grade. When I used to live in Xujiahui I hardly ever used the at-grade crossings there but used the metro tunnels instead. Furthermore, underground tunnels don't have to be dark and dingy! And, for those worried about safety, Lujiazui has over-head walkways for them!

Finally, perhaps with the exception of London, many UK town centres DO separate pedestrians from cars, often the high street or main shopping streets will be Pedestrian only with cars being diverted around the city centre or only being allowed in after shops close.
The roads themselves are not so much the problem, but rather the buildings that front them. Notice along Century Avenue in the heart of Pudong - the stretch from SWFC to the tunnel - where buildings don't actually open up to the street. The entrances are off on the side streets, so people won't likely walk in from the main street like that. Then malls and underground passageways take the rest of the pedestrian flow. There's no reason why people should even be walking along the sidewalks, and this has little to do with the wide avenue for vehicles out there.

They key to a vibrant city like what we see in Puxi is to have stores and building entrances front right to the street. People will then use the sidewalks. I also don't think using an underground passageway is efficient. You have to go down and then up, which takes more time and energy than just crossing the street on the same grade. If the buildings don't front the street already and people need to bother with using stairs/elevators to simply cross the street, they'll just stay indoors and find some passage between malls or through the metro station to use. Hence, we see a relatively dead Lujiazui and a much more vibrant Nanjing Road/Huaxia Road.

European cities, including London, are experimenting with many pedestrianization and street-sharing schemes. These days, the urban planning innovation is to integrate, and not put up barriers. Some of these include bikes as well, as they push for more environmentally-friendly modes of transport. Notice they don't tend to use underground passages to solve their street-sharing problems, and you won't see examples of them in the City at all. People walk at street-level, and the retail structure is there to support them.

London is a good example of how a vibrant city centre should look like. Are the other British town centres good examples as well for Shanghai to follow?
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Old May 26th, 2011, 12:47 PM   #1652
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mo Rush View Post
In Shanghai 16-26 June.

What would you suggest I do not miss from an architecture/urban perspective?
Make sure you visit this beautiful Huaihai road + People's square. Lujiazui + Bund. Xintiandi.

But whatever you do, just dont miss huaihai road!

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Old May 26th, 2011, 02:11 PM   #1653
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Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
The roads themselves are not so much the problem, but rather the buildings that front them. Notice along Century Avenue in the heart of Pudong - the stretch from SWFC to the tunnel - where buildings don't actually open up to the street. The entrances are off on the side streets, so people won't likely walk in from the main street like that. Then malls and underground passageways take the rest of the pedestrian flow. There's no reason why people should even be walking along the sidewalks, and this has little to do with the wide avenue for vehicles out there.

They key to a vibrant city like what we see in Puxi is to have stores and building entrances front right to the street. People will then use the sidewalks. I also don't think using an underground passageway is efficient. You have to go down and then up, which takes more time and energy than just crossing the street on the same grade. If the buildings don't front the street already and people need to bother with using stairs/elevators to simply cross the street, they'll just stay indoors and find some passage between malls or through the metro station to use. Hence, we see a relatively dead Lujiazui and a much more vibrant Nanjing Road/Huaxia Road.

European cities, including London, are experimenting with many pedestrianization and street-sharing schemes. These days, the urban planning innovation is to integrate, and not put up barriers. Some of these include bikes as well, as they push for more environmentally-friendly modes of transport. Notice they don't tend to use underground passages to solve their street-sharing problems, and you won't see examples of them in the City at all. People walk at street-level, and the retail structure is there to support them.

London is a good example of how a vibrant city centre should look like. Are the other British town centres good examples as well for Shanghai to follow?
I completely agree with you about Lujiazui needing shop fronts and buildings which open onto the street! I remember when I first went there I ate in food court outside the Pearl Tower and when I went back after the area had been 'beautified' for the Expo, all the food stalls had gone!

I agree London is a good example of a vibrant city centre, although Docklands/Canary Wharf is a bit lacking in atmosphere and is similar in its role to Lujiazui. Other town centres in UK which segregate cars from people tend to be pretty busy too, for example Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham.

Getting back to under/over passes - I personally like the idea of them and don't think they hinder street level interaction; in some cases like the circular crossing near Pearl Tower and IFC they become a tourist attraction. Like you said the reason for no vibrancy in the CBD is due to there being no shop/store fronts opening onto the streets.

Just out of interest - how do you feel about Nanjing Road East being pedestrian only? Do you think cars and people should be integrated again here?
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Old May 26th, 2011, 04:48 PM   #1654
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kix111 View Post
Make sure you visit this beautiful Huaihai road + People's square. Lujiazui + Bund. Xintiandi.

But whatever you do, just dont miss huaihai road!


A big fan of Huaihai Rd., are ya? Huaihai has definitely gotten better through out the years. I actually live on it. Huaihai East Rd. to be exact. I prefer living there to Jing An.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 05:54 PM   #1655
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Just out of interest - how do you feel about Nanjing Road East being pedestrian only? Do you think cars and people should be integrated again here?
For very big streets, complete vehicle-pedestrian sharing won't work. Opening 1 lane for vehicles in each direction will probably cause more congestion problems although pedestrian activity would not be hindered severely. Nanjing Road East will likely be a major artery connecting People's Square with the Bund, so traffic sharing might not work. Besides, it's a huge tourist attraction, and will likely have huge crowds. I'd think a smaller side street would work better.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 11:15 PM   #1656
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Any particular sports venue I should see apart from the Aquatic Centre?
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Old May 27th, 2011, 03:01 PM   #1657
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SHOW IN THE GOVERNMENT OF PODONGplanning.pudong.gov.cn
http://ww3.sinaimg.cn/large/69592df8jw1dh96jqe0n5j.jpg
design by som
194m+100m+100m
SN-1 in LUJIAZUI AREA JUST BESIDE WORLD PLAZA
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Old May 27th, 2011, 03:11 PM   #1658
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Old May 27th, 2011, 05:24 PM   #1659
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Cool, I was wondering what would sprout from that plot. Of course I had hoped it would be like 4000 meters, but I guess this will do.
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Old May 27th, 2011, 06:21 PM   #1660
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Where abouts is that tower? (I don't know where World Plaza is)
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