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Old January 1st, 2012, 08:48 AM   #1961
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Old January 1st, 2012, 09:27 AM   #1962
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Old January 1st, 2012, 09:32 AM   #1963
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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article...Feature&page=1

New kid on art block: Taopu M50

2011-12-28


Taopu M50, a 3-hectare textile mill complex in Putuo District, has become another art hub that attracts artists with spacious areas and low rent.


TWO years ago super-size exhibition space Taopu M50 in distant Putuo District was a virtual art desert and a big question mark. Today it's an important venue. Wang Jie reports.

Everyone knows the well-trod art hub and tourist magnet M50 at 50 Moganshan Road, and now Taopu M50, a textile mill complex in Putuo District, is becoming another anchor of the art scene on Shanghai's outskirts.

It's a colossal venue for colossal installations; it's both a museum and a gallery.

When it opened at the end of 2009 in Taopu area - its huge airy buildings painted in bright colors - expectations were low. It was and still is remote, there's no art ambience in the neighborhood and building up another art hub after the success of M50 was a daunting prospect.

Once M50 on Moganshan Road along Suzhou Creek was a magnet for starving artists and it is considered the cradle of Shanghai's contemporary art scene. But soon it became too expensive for struggling artists. Today it's high-end, trendy and dominated by big galleries. The 24,000-square-meter M50 is Shanghai's answer to 798 in Beijing.

Compared with it, the new Taopu M50, covering an area of nearly 3 hectares, was almost an art desert in 2009.

"That doesn't matter. Who ever heard of Moganshan Road years ago?" Taopu M50 General Manager Caroline Zhou says. "We are confident that we can change this unknown place and obsolete factory into a dynamic art venue, just as we did the old M50."

Both M50s are operated by Shantex.

Seemingly Taopu M50 is on the right track.

Most of the buildings on the site are two-storied, simple and clean, lofty and spacious, mostly built in the 1980s, far different from the gritty old warehouses on Moganshan Road.

Zhou and her team hired Margo Renisio, the French exhibition designer who worked for Shanghai Biennale, to invigorate Taopu and give it a distinctive character.

Renisio painted each building in a strong color - red, green and purple brown.

Inside it still looks and feels like a factory; no major changes have been made; the space is awe-inspiring. The area has been landscaped, the roads repaved, the entrance gate renovated and there's a cafeteria.

"It's totally a different look, like bringing something new out from the ruins," says Jin Weidong, general manager of M50 on Moganshan Road.

All these moves were not enough to warm up the new M50.

Taopu M50 invited big names, including Liu Jianhua, Yang Fudong, Yang Zhengzhong and Xu Zheng, to open studios, paying low rent.

"At that time, I needed a big studio that could both function as a warehouse and a place for creation," Liu says. "I was so happy to find this, not to mention the good rent."

Now Liu can relax in his living room on the second floor and play table tennis on the first floor in the 700-square-meter private studio.

Some studios have enormous terraces for barbecue parties.

ShanghART Gallery, a major contemporary gallery in the city, opened a branch covering 28,000 square meters.

"It's a perfect place to showcase some installations and big sculptures in the gallery's collection," says Helen Zhu, a staff member from the gallery. "We hope that the venue will become a warehouse art museum in the future."

Using big names as a magnet is a regular practice.

Tian Zi Fang, an arts and crafts enclave that developed from a renovated residential area in the former French concession, initially provided spacious low-rent studios to late visual artist Chen Yifei and photographer Deke Erh.

And the idea for Taopu M50 is that big-name artists actually work here and don't just use it as a warehouse for enormous pieces that can't go anywhere else.

"That would make us a dead community," Zhou says. "Fortunately, it hasn't happened."

Through the strong network of these famous artists, Taopu M50 gradually gained recognition in the art community. It's frequently used as a backdrop for fashion shoots.

Even Wendy Deng, wife of Rupert Murdoch, shot scenes of the place in her maiden film "The Snow Flower and the Secret Fan" (2011).

The newly opened Metro Line 11 has shortened travel time to get to Taopu M50.

"Things are getting better and better, faster than we planned," says General Manager Zhou. "But that doesn't mean that the old M50 and Taopu M50 are in a competitive relationship. Perhaps the old M50 is more fashionable and commercial, and the new M50 is more dynamic and academic."

Today young artists, architects and designers bring their energy to the venue.

Fudan University's Institute of Visual Arts has chosen Taopu M50 as an off-campus education center.

"It's not so chaotic," says Yang Fudong, one of China's top video artists.

As cities urbanize, artists must move further and further from the downtown core to find affordable studio space.

"I hope that Taopu M50 won't turn out to be a place for the privileged class in the future, " says Su Hang, a young local artist. "Otherwise I have to move to Suzhou."

Artforum magazine, considered authoritative in the art world, praised a poster exhibition titled "My Communism" at Taopu M50, calling it one of the 10 most influential exhibitions around the world in 2011. That helped put Taopu M50 on the map.

Address: 18 Wuwei Rd

How to get there: Qilianshan Road Station of Metro Line 11
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Old January 1st, 2012, 09:59 AM   #1964
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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article...Feature&page=1

Savoring the sights in Old Town

By Chen Ye | 2011-12-27


The restored Sanshan Guild Hall was built in 1909 by Fujian merchants in Shanghai.

THE Old Town area is the historical core of Shanghai that included the old walled city, and visitors can still appreciate life in the slow lane along narrow winding streets, with names like Cotton Street, Ham Street and Dog Meat Street. Chen Ye goes for a stroll.

History professor Gu Xiaoming recently paid a visit to the Old Town area and says he cannot recognize many places in the former Nanshi District.

"I really enjoy wandering about in the old neighborhood, because each street is a piece of history," says the retired professor from Fudan University. "And the vibrant daily life there represents what real Shanghai is and used to be."

However, fast urban development has made dramatic changes to the historic area, the oldest part of Shanghai, since Nanshi District was merged into Huangpu District in 2000.

Still, all history hasn't been bulldozed and there are places where one can appreciate narrow, winding streets with colorful descriptive names like Cotton Street, Dog Meat Street, Ham Street - indicating past and current functions.

The former Nanshi District was the historical root of Shanghai. It included the old, walled city as well as the nearby docklands on both sides of the Huangpu River.

"(Nanshi) Old Town is the real birthplace of Shanghai culture," says Professor Gu, from the Cultural Heritage Protection Department of Fudan University. "And most people have some connection."

In old Shanghai, Beishi (north of city) was said to be "the paradise for foreign adventurers" and Nanshi (south of city) "the heaven for local entrepreneurs."

The Old Town area contains many intriguing and famous elements.

Shiliupu (16 stores or docs) Dock used to be the biggest port in China and East Asia. At one time as many as 27 docks were planned for fishermen, salt dealers, farmers and merchants. But actually 16 were needed, and soon Shiliupu Dock became a popular market.

Gu contrasts the Old Town area with the Lujiazui in the Pudong New Area, which he says "is not a successful example of reconstruction because the entire area lost its own characteristics and became a financial center for people living a fast-paced life."

Fortunately, the Old Town area has retained some of its characteristics.

Today's Jingye Middle School is the original site of Shenjiang Shuyuan (Shenjiang College) built in 1748 in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

In 1851, the city's earliest commercial theater Sanya Hall was established at the intersection of Sipailou Road and Fangbang Road M. Further, the Second People's Hospital is the first Western medicine hospital established by Shanghai locals.

Even today, the well-known Bus No. 11 still plies a loop that takes in tourist destinations such as Yu Garden, Wenmiao and the Bund.

Professor Gu has taken part in many conferences about how to rebuild the Old Town area to retain its original appeal.

"Reconstruction is good but maintaining an appearance consistent with history and improving internal structures and facilities is better," Gu says.

Quaint names

Many of the streets in the area retain quaint names that describe their original (and current) functions; many are named after the goods sold on the streets. Huayi Street sells cotton and textiles, Gouyu Alley sells dog meat, Huotui Street sells ham, Luxi Street sells reed mat, among others.

"Different types of structures require different restoration methods, but they should retain the general appearance or style of the period; an authentic feel is more important," says Ruan Yisan, a celebrated urban planning professor at Shanghai Tongji University.

In the mid-1990s, the area was designated for two areas - new neighborhoods and old neighborhoods.

One decisive criteria was the old shared toilet facilities (no sewage system): Those with shared toilets belong to the old neighborhoods and would retain the original glamor; and the ones with independent toilets are in new neighborhoods and can be restored.

"I always asking myself whether good reconstruction and preservation should make this old town a golden egg," Ruan says. "The answer is absolutely 'no'."

If reconstruction aims to benefit the tourism industry, then rebuilding these old houses and structures becomes meaningless, he says.

There's no rational plan for land use, he says, adding that sometimes it's easier for the government to knock down an old building and make way for development than to restore it.

The Old Town area is valuable as a cultural and historical resource that should be left for future generations to appreciate, Ruan says.
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 09:00 AM   #1965
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http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article...Feature&page=1

Heritage under threat

By Chen Ye | 2011-12-27 |

AN 89-year-old woman and her daughter live alone in a vast, crumbling scholar's residence - listed as national cultural heritage - but there's no plan for repair. Chen Ye pays a visit.

Shivering Madame Guo, 89, answers the door with a quavering voice from behind the dark side room of the 250-year-old Shu Yin Lou, the crumbling Secluded Library, once part of a magnificent estate in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).

The building, which was home to one of the greatest Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) scholars, Lu Xixiong, is believed to be the city's oldest residence identified thus far. It also contained a famous library, and there still are some books and crumbling furnishings on the second floor.

Madame Guo and her daughter, Guo Yufen, 59, are without resources and have no maintenance funds, so they charge 50-yuan (US$7.90) admission to the building hidden away on Tiandeng Lane in Huangpu District.

According to Madame Guo, the city government once offered to fund the preservation of this 2,300-square-meter complex, but it finally didn't make through because of family disagreements. And now since the building is still in private hands, the city would not fund the restoration (although it's on the official protection list), she adds.

"My daughter doesn't allow me to use the heater equipment (even in this freezing winter)," complains the old lady, who uses her husband's surname ever since she married into the Guo family of Fujian merchants when she was 27 years old. Her real name is Qu Qi.

Madame Guo's daughter says, "I'm just worried that she's careless and might make a mistake using the heater, which could ruin this dilapidated building."

Shu Yin Lou, literally Book Retreat Building, used to be part of a much larger complex. It contains older elements, such as an 800-year-old Song Dynasty (960-1279) well and elaborate fretwork.

Madame Guo and her daughter are the only descendants of the wealthy Guo clan, which purchased the building from illustrious scholar Lu, who in later years became a recluse - hence the estate name Book Retreat. It is believed to have been built in 1763 by scholar Chen Suoyun, inherited by his grandchildren and sold to Lu.

The house is located in narrow Tiandeng Lane in former Nanshi District and has been famous for many years as the only large-scale Qing Dynasty residence in Shanghai.

It is one of southeast China's only three existing large, ancient libraries - the other two being Tianyi Pavilion (Ningbo, Zhejiang Province) and Jiaye Hall (Nanxun, Zhejiang Province).

A commemorative plaque of Shu Yin Lou was placed there in 1987, identifying it as part of China's national cultural heritage.

Today it is overgrown with weeds - parts of the structure have fallen down and it's home to many mice.

Madame Guo, who studied at a church school, still speaks decent English.

"My husband's family was running a shipping business in the age of flat-bottomed vessel," she says.

The old lady still remembers the day she married Guo Junlun, a famous architect, and was stunned by the vast house and grounds. Windows were decorated with elaborate fretwork and frames were delicately carved. The beams were all carved and painted. The height of some halls was 12 meters.

Madame Guo's husband graduated from the civil engineering department of Shanghai Jiao Tong University and was an expert in ancient architecture.

During the "cultural revolution" it was turned into a workshop for a food factory. The Guos reclaimed it in the 1990s.

In the early years after the house was reclaimed, owner Guo Junlun spared no effort to restore it by himself.

"The government still has no plan for reconstruction and I feel really sad about Shu Yin Lou," says famous preservationist Ruan Yisan, director of the National Research Center of Historic Cities.

Ruan says Shu Yin Lou is not only part of national cultural heritage but also a fine historic building.

"The day I moved into Shu Yin Lou (some 60 years ago), I could not take my eyes off the beautiful house," Madame Guo recalls.

However, in 2002 the western wing collapsed during a heavy storm.

Although Shu Yin Lou has fallen into shocking disrepair, it contains many interesting things. Books and various artworks are kept on the second floor, but the wooden floor has rotted and now no one is allowed there.

Guo Yuwen recalls her injury when she fell on rotting planks. "This house is a blessing passed on by our ancestors," she says.

Madame Guo and her daughter hope there will be a way to restore the old house and complex.

Address: 77 Tiandeng Lane

Admission: 50 yuan

How to get there: Fuxing Road Station of Metro Line 8 or Yu Garden Station of Metro Line 10

The history

These extravagant gardens were built in 1763 for the Lu family, who also had property in what is now Lujiazui in Pudong and on Lujiabang Road.

Lu Xixiong (one of the most prominent scholars in the Qing Dynasty) built a walled library where after his retirement he lived like a hermit, giving the compound its name.

By the late 19th century, the Lus were in decline and were forced to sell the estate to Fujian merchants named Guo.

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Old January 5th, 2012, 04:46 AM   #1966
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from www.gaoloumi.com

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尚嘉中心 - L‘ Avenue Shanghai(LV大厦)

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Old January 8th, 2012, 08:18 PM   #1967
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Good planning is not exclusively restricted to narrow streets that are easily crossable. That's a very myopic view of how good cities work. It's a whole integrated package. Wide avenues are not necessarily bad planning either as there are numerous good examples such as the Champs in Paris and the Diagonal in Barcelona.

The key to consider is the interaction between pedestrians, buildings, and the street. Lujiazui's buildings don't front the main wide boulevard. That's the key problem. By building underpasses and bridges to cross it, it alienates people from the street even further. Perhaps the original planners had no intention to make this a vibrant street full of activity at all, but rather a big traffic conduit for vehicles to get in and out.

Wide open spaces only work when people have a reason to be there. The cozy European square works because people's homes and businesses front to it, so there is a reason for people to linger about there. Having a big empty square that is bordered by roads only is a recipe for disaster. Office workers would not want to cross to get to that space while shoppers have no need to venture out when they can do everything inside a mall. This empty space then becomes a safety concern at night.

The key question is why is the space there, rather than how big that space is.

China's urban ideologies consist of a mix of cutting-edge technology and backwards-thinking suburbia. Lujiazui's wide boulevard and building setup is clearly the latter than the former. I've observed that big street on numerous occasions on work days and on holidays, and that place is devoid of life in the middle of a bustling city. Clearly, what they've done is not working.

And you don't need to build a narrow street to make it vibrant. There are many ways to beautify and add activity to a wide boulevard. The first step is to build buildings that front to it and the people will come.

Shanghai's metro network has been expanding rapidly over the past decade, and now boasts an incredible amount of trackage. I doubt there is a need to copy other cities' suburban rail model when they can do it with a subway line already. The likes of Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munich are not dense or large enough to have subway lines running everywhere, but Shanghai can do it.

I suggest you look into some of the satellite cities that are popping up around the Shanghai area. There are examples of American suburbia already, with lowrise homes in the middle of nowhere that will succumb to car culture. Not every new Chinese development is like a skyscrapered Lujiazui. Unfortunately, there's a lot more American bad planning influence out there than you think, and you need to leave Lujiazui to see it.
I agree. Lujiazui looks impressive from a distance, especially from across the river, but at street level it simply doesn't work. There are green open spaces, but they're empty and unwelcoming. You never see anyone relaxing there, eg walking dogs, or throwing a frisbee around (as you'd see in a square or park in, say, London). On the other side of the river is Puxi, which is far more like London, Paris, or New York, and imo far more attractive and successful as an urban space.

@Pansori
Your idea that modern business districts should be like Lujiazui ignores the fact that everyone I know who's spent time in Shanghai would far rather live, work, and relax in Puxi. The ideal business district should be attractive and lively with a nice mix of urban activities just like other parts of a city. I have friends in finance here in London, and their first choice location is Mayfair (where all the hedge funds are located), their second choice is the City, and their last choice by far is Canary Wharf. Frankly people dread being relocated to these sterile purpose-built business districts, and even Canary Wharf is more lively and more balanced in terms of urban activity than Lujiazui.
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Last edited by Langur; January 12th, 2012 at 04:44 AM.
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Old January 9th, 2012, 02:03 AM   #1968
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What's the status of this project?
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Old January 12th, 2012, 03:44 AM   #1969
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City eyes schools to lure foreigners
Shanghai Daily
Jan 10, 2012

THE local government will support building more international schools and give subsidies for children's tuition to high-end foreign professionals in the next four years to boost the city's ability to attract overseas talent.

"Local authorities are now working on the development framework to facilitate children of foreign families working in Shanghai, as children's education is one of the major concerns for foreign professionals," said Mao Dali, deputy director with the Shanghai Human Resources and Social Security Bureau. His statement came in a news release on the city's plans in the headhunter campaign to lure more overseas professionals.

The official said the new campuses would spring up in districts where they are most needed and that they would negotiate for lower tuition costs.

"We have heard some foreigners complain about the high tuition fees at local international schools," Mao told Shanghai Daily. "While the price is decided by the special market, offering special incentives could be a way to ease the pressure."

The bureau also said it would improve the system to make it more convenient for overseas professionals to register their children for entrance exams for admission to Chinese public middle schools and universities.

In another move, efforts will be made to improve overseas commercial medical insurance, officials said. Foreigners who have bought medical insurance from overseas insurers now can claim their medical expenses only at certain hospitals. The government plans to increase that number during the next four years. This would require the hospitals to be accredited by insurers, and related agreements.

"Local authorities are aiming to establish a settlement system for those buying foreign medical insurance to claim their local medical bills. The government will try opening channels between local hospitals and overseas insurers to set up cooperation in this regard," Mao said.

"Many foreign workers in Shanghai have purchased commercial insurance, and if their local medical expenses could be conveniently covered by the foreign insurers, that would be a major attraction," said Tang Yi, a lawyer specializing in foreign-related labor dispute lawsuits.

The city aims to attract 1,000 high-end foreign professionals.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 07:34 AM   #1970
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I agree. Lujiazui looks impressive from a distance, especially from across the river, but at street level it simply doesn't work. There are green open spaces, but they're empty and unwelcoming. You never see anyone relaxing there, eg walking dogs, or throwing a frisbee around (as you'd see in a square or park in, say, London). On the other side of the river is Puxi, which is far more like London, Paris, or New York, and imo far more attractive and successful as an urban space.
Funny you should say that about Lujiazui because I feel like Central and Admiralty feel the exact same way. From across the bay, Central/Admiralty look really stunning and stacked but there is no street level to speak of. The only way you can get anywhere via layers and layers of overpasses traversing motorways. There are no stores or shops unless you're in a ridiculously freezing mall. After having been to Central/Admiralty, I can certainly see what Lujiazui modeled after (just like everything else in Shanghai lol). Both cities' CBD's have pedestrian overpasses, obscenely pretentious over-A/Ced malls, buildings on single plots surrounded by uncrossable motorways, and have no vibrancy at the street level.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 12:59 PM   #1971
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You're right about Hong Kong's Central being carved up by urban motorways, traversed by overpasses, etc. It's not ideal. However at least it feels like a city centre. There are pedestrians around, and none of those blank lifeless green spaces that one finds in Lujiazui. Central also improves as you walk a few streets towards Lan Kwai Fong or Sheung Wan. However Lujiazui doesn't feel like an urban centre at all. There's nowhere more lively to walk within a few streets. I just feel like hopping on the Metro back to Puxi.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 08:12 PM   #1972
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RTKL pushes design envelope with new luxury residential towers in Shanghai

Working with a client that has a long history of pushing the design envelope for high-end residential projects in Asia, LXM Residential Towers is set to become the most innovative and luxurious residential development in China in the heart of Shanghai’s Laoximen district. The project consists of five residential towers, all close to the 100m height restriction, sitting on a two-level retail podium, as well as a free-standing residential tower.

With approximately 85% of the above-grade gross floor area dedicated to residential space and 15% to retail, the project will benefit not only its residents, but also the surrounding neighbourhood with exceptional shopping amenities. The exterior design creates a distinctive silhouette on the city’s skyline, featuring primarily glass towers with floor-to-ceiling glazing and windows arranged as thin, solid panels in a random pattern. Fritted glass provides privacy where needed while exterior sunshades create strong horizontal lines to tie together the residential facades, as well as eliminate views from the retail space into the apartments.

As a testament to the project’s luxury status, all of LXM’s units are served by private elevators and highly-secure private garages. The main lobby for each tower is located on the third level rooftop garden above the retail podium with additional secure entries through small lobbies on the first and B2 levels that provide access to the street and grocery stores. In addition to private elevators and open, flexible unit planning, the LXM Towers will continue RTKL’s and the client’s legacies of design innovation, featuring private swimming pools and guest houses for extended families that will be a first for China’s residential market.







http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=18685
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Old January 15th, 2012, 02:36 PM   #1973
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Affordable housing still key priority in Shanghai
Shanghai Daily
Jan 15, 2012

SHANGHAI will proceed with its affordable housing program this year as the city continues to make efforts to improve the living standards of middle to low-income households.

Construction of 11 million square meters of affordable housing will begin in the city this year, Liu Haisheng, director of the Shanghai Housing Support and Building Administration Bureau, told a municipal conference yesterday.

Budget homes will account for 53,000 units, homes for relocated residents will total 42,800 units and there will be 40,000 units of public rent apartments.

The city's affordable housing program mainly consists of budget homes, houses built for relocated residents, public housing units for rental as well as some low-rent apartments catering to low-income families.

Under the plan, a total of 90,000 affordable housing units are supposed to be completed this year. The new supply of such houses to hit the market should reach 7.7 million square meters, or 110,000 units, in 2012.

The city has been working hard to increase the supply of affordable housing as high home prices have priced many out of the market.
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Old January 15th, 2012, 02:54 PM   #1974
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RTKL pushes design envelope with new luxury residential towers in Shanghai

The project consists of five residential towers, all close to the 100m height restriction, sitting on a two-level retail podium, as well as a free-standing residential tower.





http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=18685

I didn't realise there was a 100m height restriction on residentials...
Somewhere dense and with a huge and growing population like Shanghai would be the idea candidate for the the Worlds Tallest Residential, or at least a supertall residential!
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Old January 15th, 2012, 03:00 PM   #1975
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I didn't realise there was a 100m height restriction on residentials...
Somewhere dense and with a huge and growing population like Shanghai would be the idea candidate for the the Worlds Tallest Residential, or at least a supertall residential!
I think the restriction is just for certain areas, but I'm not sure why. In Lujiazui there are residential twin towers of 280m height proposed (plot next to ST).
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Old January 16th, 2012, 10:41 AM   #1976
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Maybe its close to the Bund? On the other hand the design seems very Pudongesque...
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Old January 16th, 2012, 12:12 PM   #1977
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ganghui View Post
Maybe its close to the Bund? On the other hand the design seems very Pudongesque...
It's in Laoximen district.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 02:43 PM   #1978
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Then it makes even more sense, if its close to the old city.
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Old February 1st, 2012, 04:05 PM   #1979
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Shanghai restricts use of glass curtain walls in buildings over safety concerns

SHANGHAI, Jan. 31 (Xinhua) -- The use of reflective glass curtain walls will be banned in apartment, hospital, school, kindergarten and nursing home structures that have two stories or more, a local construction official said in Shanghai on Tuesday, citing safety concerns.

"Cracking and dropping glass curtain walls have become a hidden danger for urban residents. The problem of their reflection is also outstanding," said Shen Xiaosu, deputy director of the Shanghai Municipal Urban-Rural Construction and Transportation Committee.

Shanghai currently has 4,210 buildings using glass curtain walls, of which 475 have reported safety problems, he said.

"Some of the buildings have entered an aging period, with their ironware rusted and twisted, sealing strips cracked, and bearing carriers loosened. Accidents, like dropping glass curtain walls, have taken place many times over recent years, posing a prominent safety issue," he said.

Therefore, construction authorities have drawn up a new regulation to restrict the use of reflective glass curtain walls to ensure public safety. The regulation has been approved by the municipal government and will take effect Wednesday, he said.

According to the regulation, reflective glass curtain walls will also not be allowed in buildings that directly face the straight section of "T-shaped" crossroads.

Moreover, the use of such walls will be restricted in buildings that are situated beside a street or in areas with heavy human traffic.

"The construction and housing authorities will launch a general overhaul of the city's glass curtain walls by the end of March to check their quality and ensure timely maintenance," Shen said.
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Old February 2nd, 2012, 12:29 PM   #1980
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Oh no, the Shanghai Tower is placed right next to a T-shaped crossing!
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