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Old October 4th, 2010, 04:10 PM   #2581
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chjbolton View Post
Quick question: the curvy sides of the building will probably make it a little bit of a bitch to reach the windows and clean them but I'm sure they'll manage...
What about the 'aluminum' clad itself? Won't it be necessary to scrub that on a regular basis?
I mean... look at how gorgeous those diffused reflections are but it won't stay like this for long given NY's winter climate.
Anyone knows if they plan to do anything about that?

For instance, the Eiffel Tower needs to be re-painted every 7 years. (Funny anecdote is that it actually takes 7 years to repaint it so, painting the Eiffel Tower... is some dude's job FOR LIFE! Once he reaches the top, he starts again at the bottom. )
I hope he will bring some friends then
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Old October 5th, 2010, 08:47 PM   #2582
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interesting article...

posted originally by Merry
Quote:

Gehry on New Gehry Building

By PETER GRANT

The gleaming new Beekman tower designed by architect Frank Gehry won't be open for renters until early next year. But reviews are beginning to pour in of the 76-story skyscraper—New York's tallest residential building—that already has become a major presence on the downtown skyline.

Most of the reviews of the tower and its distinctive, crinkly metal facade have been good.

While some architects privately describe the design as "forced" and "exaggerated," the consensus is that it's a welcome addition that complements the nearby Woolworth Building and Municipal Building, which were built nearly a century earlier.

"Here is Gehry relatively restrained, his usual geometrical gymnastics tempered by more traditional skyscraping aspirations," says the new AIA Guide to New York City.

For Mr. Gehry, the tower marks only his second major work in New York—after his IAC/InterActiveCorp headquarters building overlooking the Hudson River—and it is by far the most significant local contribution of the 81-year-old Pritzker Prize-winner.

His earlier designs for major signature projects, like a new Guggenheim museum over the East River and a Nets Arena at Atlantic Yards in Brooklyn, never got off the drawing boards.

In an interview he discussed the new tower, which is going to be marketed by its developer, Forest City Ratner Cos., as "New York by Gehry at Eight Spruce Street." Here are excerpts:

WSJ: How did you come up with the design concept for the tower?

Frank Gehry: I walked the streets a lot and looked at what was built in the past. I was looking for what the essence of New York was. Step-backs are a distinguishing feature of New York skyscrapers.

So I decided to work with that. I also saw a lot of modernist mistakes like putting glass at the corner of towers. It sort of weakens the form of the building. In the best buildings the corners are solid. There's a strength to that.

WSJ: Many of your best known projects are almost sculptures themselves that house museums or performing arts halls. How does your design of this one reflect its residential use?

FG: Since it was a residential tower, I wanted to do something that there aren't many of in New York, which is have apartments with bay windows. If you walk to a normal facade, you can push your nose against the window and you can see in either direction a little bit.

If it's a bay window, you feel like you're walking into space.

But if you have a bay window at the same place in the floor plan in every floor you get a vertical projection that's lined up all the way to the top, which would have been a harsh move. I wanted to soften that like a fabric.

WSJ: Is that why you selected the look and texture of the facade?

FG: I've been fascinated with the studies of fabric by great artists through time—like Michelangelo, Leonardo. Apparently in their spare time they always drew fabric. You find a lot of those drawings in their archives.

I probably rationalize this but there's probably a primate sense that when you're in your mother's arms as a baby: the folds in their clothes become very intimately associated with comfort and warmth. So those folds are functional.

WSJ: How did your design take into account its neighbors like the Woolworth Building?

FG: I am a contexualist. I pay a lot of attention to where I'm doing things. And I have a mind-set not to talk down to people or places. People have been telling me this is a New York building. I don't think you would build that building anywhere else.

With its stair-steps, it has a New York persona. I think I've nailed that part of it. That was intentional. I think it talks to the Woolworth Building. I like the juxtaposition. It sure as hell doesn't talk down to it. It holds its own.

WSJ: You're well known for using computer-assisted design techniques. How were they utilized in this project?

FG: That's what made it possible. According to my client, the premium for our work, the architecture in this building was zero.

There was no added cost over his normal pro forma for a building of this topic. We had an economic pro forma. We lived within it and we got a premium aesthetic and a premium function within the same price as a normal building.

That was possible because the precision of the tools I used to define the building and cut back on change orders and waste.

It must feel satisfying to see this tower completed after some of your other projects here, like the Guggenheim and Atlantic Yards, didn't come to fruition.

The Atlantic Yards was the same client [Forest City Ratner] and there was a business decision to change and make it a much smaller building.

It wasn't like everyone says that my building was more expensive. That wasn't it. My building was within the parameters of their program and not more expensive. I'm very careful about that.

The Guggenheim over the water was never real. It was always kind of a dream.

WSJ: Has it been frustrating that these projects didn't move forward?

FG: There are a lot of good architects that have never done anything in New York. So I'm blessed.

The other good thing about this is that my father was born in New York. He lived in Hell's Kitchen and was very poor. Emotionally I think of him. And I wish he were here to see it.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...NewsCollection
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Old October 5th, 2010, 09:21 PM   #2583
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Time to start seeing pictures of the INSIDE of Beekman. Lobby, parking, lower level apartments, elevators...
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Old October 5th, 2010, 09:33 PM   #2584
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shine on you crazy diamond...!

Egon Olsen

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In many ways a worthy successor to the classic 'scrapers of NYC and so much better than all those 70's banalities but a flat top is ultra-boring!!
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Old October 5th, 2010, 10:53 PM   #2585
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From the NY Times:

Quote:
New Gehry Tower Prepares for Renters

By FRED A. BERNSTEIN
Published: October 5, 2010

For years, New York developers have been trying to maximize the value of residential properties by hiring celebrity architects. At Philip Johnson’s Urban Glass House, Richard Meier’s Perry Street apartments and Jean Nouvel’s 100 11th Avenue, the architects were chosen in part to raise condominium prices.

Now the developer Bruce Ratner, of Forest City Ratner, is about to determine if a big-name architect can do the same for rental apartments. His new tower at 8 Spruce Street, just south of the Brooklyn Bridge, was designed by Frank Gehry, who gave it an undulating skin that ripples like the Statue of Liberty’s gown, but in stainless steel rather than copper.

At 867 feet, 8 Spruce Street (which for a time was known as Beekman Tower) is the tallest residential building in the city, surpassing the Trump World Tower, which would make it notable even without Gehry’s distinctive facade. In an interview Mr. Gehry demonstrated how the folds were conceived by pinching the sleeve of his black turtleneck shirt between the fingers of his hand. But what is important to him, Mr. Gehry said, isn’t how the folds look but what they do to the interiors, which unfold in a riot of angled alcoves and bay windows, no two exactly the same.

With more than 600 different apartment layouts, potential renters may want to see dozens of units before selecting one to live in. That could be a headache for the building’s rental agents, who will begin showing units by the end of the first quarter next year, said MaryAnne Gilmartin, an executive vice president of Forest City Ratner.

Several hundred apartments, on the building’s lower floors, will hit the market at that time, she said. Additional sections of the building will be rented as they are completed over the course of about a year. Ms. Gilmartin said that, after looking at other high-end rental buildings, including Silver Towers on West 42nd Street, she thought rents might be about $80 per square foot per year. That would put the rent for the smallest apartment at 8 Spruce Street — a 450-square-foot-studio — at $3,000 a month.

But Ms. Gilmartin said that if demand was strong enough, the company would have no qualms about raising the prices “even over the course of a single day.” She said she also would not be surprised to get preemptive offers for some of the top-floor apartments. Forest City Ratner was even considering leaving one or more floors unfinished — something rarely if ever done in a rental building — for tenants who would like to customize their units.

If the apartments do command high rents, it will mean a big payday for Forest City Ratner. One reason is that the company received tax abatements, under a program originally meant to stimulate construction of affordable housing. (In 2006, Community Board 1 passed a resolution criticizing the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development for giving the 20-year abatement to a building with no affordable housing component.)

Another is that the undulating facades cost the company only slightly more than it would have spent on conventional curtain walls, Mr. Gehry and Ms. Gilmartin said. Mr. Gehry said he wanted dispel a rumor that the building’s south side is completely flat because he needed to cut costs. “It cost exactly the same,” said Mr. Gehry, who produced a geode from a shelf in his office to demonstrate the effect he was going for: a rough volume with one very smooth surface.

Since 2004, when the project was first announced, it has had as many ups and downs as the facades have folds. Originally, the top floors were to contain condominiums. Forest City Ratner brought in the real estate marketing guru Louise Sunshine to help lay out the condominiums.

But in late 2006, when it seemed as if there were too many homes coming to market in Manhattan, the company decided to eliminate the condos. Mr. Gehry went back to the electronic drawing board, reducing both the ceiling heights to about nine feet — which required adjustments to the facade — and changing the apartment layouts with the help of Nancy Packes, whom he described as the rental counterpart to Ms. Sunshine. Construction on the building was halted twice, as Forest City Ratner worked out financing and labor problems. (Forest City was a development partner in the new Midtown headquarters of The New York Times Company.)

Not all of the building is covered in stainless steel. Mr. Gehry designed a simple brick enclosure for what may turn out to be one of the building’s chief selling points: an elementary school at the building’s base, with room for 630 students. He said that he deliberately made the school of brick — even after Mr. Ratner called him and offered to pick up the tab if he wanted to continue the undulating metal facades all the way down to the ground. “I wanted to make the base part of the neighborhood,” the architect said.

Part of that base — the building’s residential lobby — already contains an undulating desk-cum-bench by Mr. Gehry. Upstairs, his firm chose finishes and fixtures, including doorknobs by Mr. Gehry for the Italian manufacturer Valli + Valli. Gehry Partners is also furnishing 18 model apartments.

Mr. Gehry said he hasn’t yet been to the top of the 76-story tower, because he is scared of taking the construction elevator attached to its west facade. But the 12 elevators serving the residential part of the building are already being tested, meaning his first trip to the top could happen soon. Because hotels are more practical for his short trips to New York, Mr. Gehry said, he has no plans to rent.
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Old October 6th, 2010, 09:49 AM   #2586
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So 600 different apartment layouts from angled alcoves and bay windows created from the ripple -- no two the same. This thing is crazier inside than out.
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Old October 8th, 2010, 02:43 AM   #2587
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are there any floor plans for the apartments yet?
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Old October 8th, 2010, 04:50 PM   #2588
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Old October 9th, 2010, 12:49 AM   #2589
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Love that angle!!
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Old October 9th, 2010, 05:32 PM   #2590
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from the NY Times:



















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Old October 9th, 2010, 06:30 PM   #2591
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Nice pics HK999.....
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Old October 9th, 2010, 07:17 PM   #2592
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just gorgeous!
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Old October 10th, 2010, 03:43 AM   #2593
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Would love to live there!
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Old October 10th, 2010, 06:27 AM   #2594
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It's fun noticing this building now in tv commercials showing NY's skyline.
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Old October 10th, 2010, 06:53 AM   #2595
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This is a classic NY photo!

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Old October 10th, 2010, 02:54 PM   #2596
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Quote:
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It's fun noticing this building now in tv commercials showing NY's skyline.
it's quite "creepy" () when i, as a skyscraper fan, watch a movie where the NY skyline is shown and all i can think about is: ah... the BofA, where is BofA?, ok it's there ... goldman sachs ... puh ok it's also shown ... beekman tower- what, no beekman?
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Old October 10th, 2010, 08:08 PM   #2597
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It's fun noticing this building now in tv commercials showing NY's skyline.
I freak out and say, "LOOK it's the Beekman!"
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Old October 10th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #2598
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Old October 11th, 2010, 01:10 AM   #2599
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Quote:
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it's quite "creepy" () when i, as a skyscraper fan, watch a movie where the NY skyline is shown and all i can think about is: ah... the BofA, where is BofA?, ok it's there ... goldman sachs ... puh ok it's also shown ... beekman tower- what, no beekman?
I'm doin' this in every movie..
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Old October 11th, 2010, 03:25 AM   #2600
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I'm doin' this in every movie..
SAME HERE
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