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Old March 5th, 2011, 09:04 AM   #2861
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why??
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Old March 5th, 2011, 11:00 AM   #2862
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noms78 View Post
Mods: "Beekman Place" has been renamed to "8 Spruce St". Please change thread title.
actually beekman has been renamed to "new york by gehry". the thread title should stay.
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Old March 6th, 2011, 05:37 AM   #2863
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It's being market as new york by gehry. 8 Spruce Street tower is what the building is called
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Old March 6th, 2011, 05:47 AM   #2864
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actually beekman has been renamed to "new york by gehry". the thread title should stay.
+1

Everybody calls it "Beekman" regardless of what some marketing schlub fresh out of Hofstra U. thinks!
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Old March 6th, 2011, 05:56 PM   #2865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
+1

Everybody calls it "Beekman" regardless of what some marketing schlub fresh out of Hofstra U. thinks!
Same for Sears Tower, but the title still should always be changed to the official name, we still can write 8 Spruce St (Beekman Place) in the headline i guess
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Old March 8th, 2011, 01:42 AM   #2866
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Incredible!
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Old March 31st, 2011, 03:48 PM   #2867
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http://www.archpaper.com/e-board_rev.asp?News_ID=5252

New York by Gehry struggles to find its place among Manhattan skyscrapers



Perhaps because the means of murder on that day was the sudden destruction of buildings of architectural distinction, the early moments of what was once called the Post-9/11 Era featured, for some, a surprising project of rapidly designing and building great works of architecture. Well, good luck with that, might be our retroactive comment to ourselves of a sudden ten years ago.

That impulse toward architectural something-ness, lugubriously directed by Daniel Libeskind and a host of political and corporate enablers, dissipated over time. With the exceptions of Michael Arad’s promising memorial project, and the singular efforts of Snøhetta’s modestly audacious visitor’s center, adjacent work has reverted to our provincial glassy generic.

After several near-miss big-time proposals for Lower Manhattan, prominent Los Angeles architect Frank Gehry has joined in with an 870-foot residential skyscraper at Beekman Place. The tower features his signature curvy metal cladding, achieved in this case by what are essentially dozens of stories of successively shifted shallow bay windows, their edges interpolated into tangents along a pattern of vertical ripples. A generally T-shaped plan, with the capstone of the T facing south, ameliorates the building’s impact on the nearby skyline, breaking down its bulk (and rewarding especially those vaguely rotational from-the-freeway automotive views from the BQE, the FDR, and the nearby Brooklyn Bridge). A dainty entrance plaza along the building’s West facade brings a certain grace to the proximate streetscape. There’s a desk in the lobby that has the voluptuous appeal of Gehry’s recent jewelry collections.

A New York City skyscraper is an acute design exercise with all the tight formal, structural, material, and conventional constraints—and therefore all the vast resounding potential—of a sonnet. Some constraints are Architecture 101: the building must successfully scrape the sky and stick its landing on the ground. Others are more particular to our city: a local skyscraper must contend and dance with the envelopes and setbacks and FAR’s that mean, as Koolhaas famously observed, all of Manhattan has already been maximally designed; it must participate in the long panorama of the North-South skyline; it must in a city of extraordinary density and deep narrow vistas, be carefully considered in extreme close up and long distance. In short, it must know where it is.



This skyscraper tops out like a decapitated bundle of celery. It meets the ground not at all, instead descending on a six-story reddish masonry base with the grace of an ecclesiastically-scaled candle landing on a cupcake. The street-level detailing, such as a grim strip of flashing that sits at the top of those masonry walls, seems almost willfully casual next to the gloriously, if laboriously, resolved facade of Pace University’s neighboring mid-century complex. Setbacks, whether the shaft-and-bustle of the nearby Woolworth Building, or in the tower-and-plaza of midtown’s modernist masterpieces, are behind much of the beauty of Manhattan: the negotiation between the inherent geometries of a skyscraper and its enclosing almost-visible crystalline volume is perhaps New York’s most monumentally intimate encounter. Here, in a sorely missed opportunity, those vertical ripples ignore each setback where instead those orthogonal sectional deflections in the structure should have supplied moments of glorious turbulence and eddy and moments of exchange between architectural and urban intention.

In what may be—or worse yet, may merely appear to be—a hasty exercise in value engineering, those ripples disappear altogether from the South facade, where their occasional shading effect might have been environmentally justified. This gesture puzzles all the more in this rare Manhattan skyscraper that sits on its own island; that fronts, thanks to that entrance plaza and an adjacent alleyway, all four compass points; and further, thanks to the rare open vistas afforded by City Hall Park, the bridge approach ramps, and the East River, might—like the former Trade Center Towers themselves—address the entire horizon with all the duty and splendid isolation of a lighthouse. Instead we have a front. And a back. And a displaced building waiting to be filed away among the narrow frontages and deep block interiors of midtown. Or Houston.

How to account for all this? It cannot be a lack of ability: Gehry has produced some of the most masterful and meaningful buildings of the past century. It cannot be a lack of local expertise: Gehry very successfully harvested Gotham’s grit and grid in his charismatic bandbox of a building for the IAC headquarters in far West Chelsea (which admittedly bears a certain resemblance to the low-lying warehouses and garages of, say, Culver City).

New York by Gehry. That’s the name the developers finally settled on. The phrase invites the question of whether the building represents a failure or success by architect or city. One reading of what happened here is that, since architectural excellence in Manhattan is as exceptional, and therefore as potentially unsettling, as an untouched ruin, the appearance near Ground Zero of such a building as this represents a certain kind of successful recovery and realignment to historic norms by a city that has long known how to defeat architects: thus Gehry by New York. On the other hand, architecture is required to rise to its occasions. In this, there are two ways to fall short. One of them, the interesting way, is to fail by trying too hard. By caring too much. By grasping and overreaching. This may have been the case with many unbuilt early contenders for the reconstruction of Lower Manhattan. (Sir Norman Foster’s genuinely sublime 2002 scheme for the entire site with its redoubled tessellated towers, famously remains the readers of the New York Posts’ favorite.) These are successful failures, in which the legible drama of visible effort ameliorates undeniable shortcomings in function or form. Then there is the other kind of failure.

Thomas De Monchaux
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Old March 31st, 2011, 09:41 PM   #2868
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Why does this building need an external elevator shaft for so long?
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Old March 31st, 2011, 10:31 PM   #2869
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I love that building. I brings something new and fresh to one of the greatest cities in the world
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Old March 31st, 2011, 10:49 PM   #2870
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oilmanjr View Post
Why does this building need an external elevator shaft for so long?
I think it's because they are using it to lift material to fit out the apartments. This is unlike commercial skyscrapers where the floors are usually finished to the bare-minimum and the majority of the interior fit-out is left to the tenants.

I'm no expert, though.

Nice to see another North Dakotan here, too. Although I can't wait to leave for NYC. Can't come soon enough...
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Old April 1st, 2011, 05:56 AM   #2871
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Where are you from!?

I can't wait to go to NYC too.. even though there are no plans yet haha. It's a dream of mine, I guess.
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Old April 1st, 2011, 10:37 AM   #2872
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I't great!!! thank for pic.
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Old April 1st, 2011, 01:08 PM   #2873
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just stunning!! last summer when i was in ny i was so amazed!!
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 01:10 AM   #2874
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That article by Thomas De Monchaux is bizarre. Is English not his first language?

The vocabulary is complex enough that it doesn't seem like a translation. But the thought structure, if not from translation, is indicative of insanity. It reminds me of a few brilliant but mentally ill people I've known. The concepts are complex but chaotic.

Either way, somewhat fitting for this tower.
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 01:31 AM   #2875
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Exactly. It's something you'd expect from a random journalist or Newyorker. People that are not associated with this forum and who are just inhabitants, think of skyscrapers in a different way. This building is so different from it's surroundings. I honestly think that it doesn't really belong there. The design is nice, it's a cool tower. It just doesn't fit in IMO.
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 01:41 AM   #2876
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look back to page one and see what people said about it in the first few posts, i think it is a great tower and love that rainbow pic of it! Its amazing how people just change their mind when they see it completed
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Old April 2nd, 2011, 01:43 AM   #2877
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I know. I blame myself for that all the time. I think my thoughts and views on skyscrapers have changed over the years. I don't even know when I first said something about this project. Though I was just a new member back then I guess and I thought everything was cool as long as it was tall. I'm gonna take a look because you made me curious!
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Old April 4th, 2011, 05:25 AM   #2878
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The funny thing about that review of this tower seems to focus, first and foremost, on this tower being out of place and time. But really, if you think of the past decade, it suites New York, of all possible places, perfectly.

There was, as the reviewer stated, a new skyscraper design boom in the city after 9/11, with architects being inspired by the potential to remake NYC's former tallest buildings, and then moving on to other potential projects once they'd lost interest and/or lost their chance to do so. People then, having lost that chance, decided to go a bit more freeform on buildings that are less symbolically important to the city; the towers were treated less like monuments that happened to serve a function and more like enormous pieces of postmodern art.

And then of course, there was the loss of the Twin Towers themselves. It took out the skyline's defining structure, and obviously successfully made New Yorkers, and Americans generally, less sure that the financial doings and economy that made such towers necessary in the first place. It was a bit of a blast to the American psyche, which I think most people would say we're still dealing with. And of course, the economic crisis, which began in the financial industry for which New York serves as one of two or three global nodes, has, since its occurrence, made us all feel a bit less sure that things are going the way they're supposed to.

In light of all that, this tower, which I've always thought looks like it's been melted, sandblasted, and cut away, reflects the damage that's happened to America over the past decade, damage which may be just as permanent as the building's owners must hope their new skyscraper will be. Maybe that's why it's received such mixed reviews. Instead of being a powerful monument to the American way, it reflects some new unease we have. After all, no one likes to be reminded that things aren't perfect. And yet, here we have 870 feet of imperfection.

I think that in itself makes this a valuable addition to the New York skyline.
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Old April 6th, 2011, 10:55 PM   #2879
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in 1889, Eiffel Tower didn't fit Paris skyline also.
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Old April 11th, 2011, 02:43 PM   #2880
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