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Old November 18th, 2007, 02:38 PM   #701
Ebola
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Once again, I saw this amazing tower in person, almost all lit up at night, and my jaw dropped. Every time I see this tower in person, I love it more and more.

It's totally worth taking a few extra seconds to get a peak of for anyone who ever plans to visit the city. It's one of those towers that makes you turn your head.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 02:44 PM   #702
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EszettRocks View Post
There are no "brown yuck" buildings in the picture. That glamorous view beats easily all the Dubaish look-at-me-I'm-dazzling views you can see nowadays all over the world.
Certainly New York is looking to dazzle as much as the next place.

The contrast in the picture is interesting. I think what really struck me is how all those brown buildings look like a big mass.

Last edited by walli; November 18th, 2007 at 03:43 PM.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 03:01 PM   #703
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I can't believe that he's still whining about the spire, and now about some other complete nonsense not even related, like about "brown yuck" and how the apex of modern civilization looks like it has "third world conditions" when really at least 80% of those 'borwn yuck' buildings have more character than that of any other city and living in them costs more than most people in the world could ever afford.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 03:44 PM   #704
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EszettRocks View Post
That glamorous view beats easily all the Dubaish look-at-me-I'm-dazzling views you can see nowadays all over the world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebola View Post
... buildings have more character than that of any other city and living in them costs more than most people in the world could ever afford.
Why does every thread about buildings in New York have to become a 'versus' thread?
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Old November 18th, 2007, 04:02 PM   #705
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^ You just made me spit up my drink from laughing.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 04:30 PM   #706
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Quote:
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Most of those brown brick buildings are beautiful structures dating from the early 1900's. When seen up close, they have magificent details, columns and stone work.
Here are close-ups of the mass of brown brick that you see. These buildings are stunning 1920's structures.






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Old November 18th, 2007, 07:58 PM   #707
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Taken on November 10th....

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Old November 18th, 2007, 10:07 PM   #708
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"third world"?? are you serious??

Quote:
Originally Posted by walli View Post
This one actually cuts off 250' of the building (unless you don't count the 400' antenna as part of the building, in which case this one should not be in the 'Supertalls' thread).



This picture shows the NY Times Building extremely well. That being said, the other thing that one really notices in this picture is how many ugly buildings New York has. Look at that huge mass of brown yuck in the foreground! I realize those structures are from a prior era, but still. Cut off the buildings in the back, and you've got third world conditions. Wow!
I'm sooo curious to know where you are from "Walli". For anybody to make suck a stupid statement must have never ever been to NYC. You must be from a developing country where most buildings were built in the last 10 years or so. Therefore, you obviously would not recognize the beauty of older buildings with their patina, moldings, carvings etc...

NYC and Chicago are so much more interesting than all those new skyscraper cities with their true "third world" slums right next to carbon copy skyscrapers. After all, dozens of "supertall" buildings with fancy spires, glass and neon/laser lights start to look incredibly boring after a while as well. Give me variation in heights, density, and architectural diversity anyday. Anybody who says NYC and Chicago buildings all look boxy and the same have obviously never been to either place.

Also, look hard at the Hong Kong forums...so many ugly slum-like residential high-rises. Hong Kong is amazing but if you look for ugly...you can find in anywhere sweetie...
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Old November 18th, 2007, 10:27 PM   #709
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I really love New York, and I hope I`l be back soon so I can see this beautiful tower. Great photo, and no crappy buildings!

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Old November 18th, 2007, 10:48 PM   #710
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Thank you Lloyd for posting those pictures of the "brown yuck". They do appear a bit messy from afar but up close they are stunning and beautiful. Glad we got that resolved.

NY Times Tower looks really well in that picture.
I love it! Those weird fences that appear at the top go well with the building IMO.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 11:32 PM   #711
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Those are the McScams by Gene Kaufman.
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Old November 20th, 2007, 11:06 PM   #712
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http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/20/ar...ion&oref=login
Pride and Nostalgia Mix in The Times’s New Home

By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF
Published: November 20, 2007


Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

The heart of the newspaper is the main newsroom, on the second, third and fourth floors, topped by a skylight and linked by stairways, with a wraparound balcony on the highest level.



Vincent Laforet

The New York Times Building: The new headquarters by Renzo Piano.



Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

The 14th-floor cafeteria of the Times building offers expansive views.



Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

An enclosed garden of birch trees and moss greets visitors to the lobby and TheTimesCenter auditorium.



Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

The newsroom is pierced by a double-height skylight well on the third and fourth floors.


Writing about your employer’s new building is a tricky task. If I love it, the reader will suspect that I’m currying favor with the man who signs my checks. If I hate it, I’m just flaunting my independence.

So let me get this out of the way: As an employee, I’m enchanted with our new building on Eighth Avenue. The grand old 18-story neo-Gothic structure on 43rd Street, home to The New York Times for nearly a century, had its sentimental charms. But it was a depressing place to work. Its labyrinthine warren of desks and piles of yellowing newspapers were redolent of tradition but also seemed an anachronism.

The new 52-story building between 40th and 41st Streets, designed by the Italian architect Renzo Piano, is a paradise by comparison. A towering composition of glass and steel clad in a veil of ceramic rods, it delivers on Modernism’s age-old promise to drag us — in this case, The Times — out of the Dark Ages.

I enjoy gazing up at the building’s sharp edges and clean lines when I emerge from the subway exit at 40th Street and Seventh Avenue in the morning. I love being greeted by the cluster of silvery birch trees in the lobby atrium, their crooked trunks sprouting from a soft blanket of moss. I even like my fourth-floor cubicle, an oasis of calm overlooking the third-floor newsroom.

Yet the spanking new building is infused with its own nostalgia.

The last decade has been a time of major upheaval in newspaper journalism, with editors and reporters fretting about how they should adapt to the global digital age. In New York that anxiety has been compounded by the terrorist attacks of 2001, which prompted many corporations to barricade themselves inside gilded fortresses.

Mr. Piano’s building is rooted in a more comforting time: the era of corporate Modernism that reached its apogee in New York in the 1950s and 60s. If he has gently updated that ethos for the Internet age, the building is still more a paean to the past than to the future.

What makes a great New York skyscraper? The greatest of them tug at our heartstrings. We seek them out in the skyline, both to get our bearings and to anchor ourselves psychologically in the life of the city.

Mr. Piano’s tower is unlikely to inspire that kind of affection. The building’s most original feature is a scrim of horizontal ceramic rods that diffuses sunlight and lends the exterior a clean, uniform appearance. Mr. Piano used a similar screening system for his 1997 Debis Tower for Daimler-Benz in Berlin, to mixed results. For The Times, he spent months adjusting the rods’ color and scale, and in the early renderings they had a lovely, ethereal quality.

Viewed from a side street today, they have the precision and texture of a finely tuned machine. But despite the architect’s best efforts, the screens look flat and lifeless in the skyline. The uniformity of the bars gives them a slightly menacing air, and the problem is compounded by the battleship gray of the tower’s steel frame. Their dull finish deprives the facades of an enlivening play of light and shadow.

The tower’s crown is also disappointing. To hide the rooftop’s mechanical equipment and create the impression that the tower is dissolving into the sky, Mr. Piano extended the screens a full six stories past the top of the building’s frame. Yet the effect is ragged and unfinished. Rather than gathering momentum as it rises, the tower seems to fizzle.

But if the building is less than spectacular in the skyline, it comes to life when it hits the ground. All of Mr. Piano’s best qualities are in evidence here — the fine sense of proportion, the love of structural detail, the healthy sense of civic responsibility.

The architect’s goal is to blur the boundary between inside and out, between the life of the newspaper and the life of the street. The lobby is encased entirely in glass, and its transparency plays delightfully against the muscular steel beams and spandrels that support the soaring tower.

People entering the building from Eighth Avenue can glance past rows of elevator banks all the way to the fairy tale atrium garden and beyond, to the plush red interior of TheTimesCenter auditorium. From the auditorium, you gaze back through the trees to the majestic lobby space. In effect, the lobby itself is a continuous public performance.

The sense of transparency is reinforced by the people streaming through the lobby. The flow recalls the dynamic energy of Grand Central Terminal’s Great Hall or the Rockefeller Center plaza, proud emblems of early-20th-century mobility.

Architecturally, however, The New York Times Building owes its greatest debt to postwar landmarks like Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Lever House or Mies van der Rohe’s Seagram Building — designs that came to embody the progressive values and industrial power of a triumphant America. Their streamlined glass-and-steel forms proclaimed a faith in machine-age efficiency and an open, honest, democratic society.

Newspaper journalism, too, is part of that history. Transparency, independence, the free flow of information, moral clarity, objective truth — these notions took hold and flourished in the last century at papers like The Times. To many this idealism reached its pinnacle in the period stretching from the civil rights movement to the Vietnam War to Watergate, when journalists grew accustomed to speaking truth to power, and the public could still accept reporters as impartial observers.

This longing for an idealistic time permeates the main newsroom. Pierced by a double-height skylight well on the third and fourth floors, the newsroom has a cool, insular feel even as the facades of the surrounding buildings press in from the north and south. The well functions as a center of gravity, focusing attention on the paper’s nerve center. From many of the desks you also enjoy a view of the delicate branches of the atrium’s birch trees.

Internal staircases link the various newsroom floors to encourage interaction. The work cubicles are flanked by rows of glass-enclosed offices, many of which are unassigned so that they can be used for private phone conversations or spontaneous meetings. Informal groupings of tables and chairs are also scattered about, creating a variety of social spaces.

From the higher floors, which house the corporate offices of The Times and 22 floors belonging to the developer Forest City Ratner, the views become more expansive. Cars rush up along Eighth Avenue. Billboards and electronic signs loom from all directions. By the time you reach the 14th-floor cafeteria, the entire city begins to come into focus, with dazzling views to the north, south, east and west. A long, narrow balcony is suspended within the cafeteria’s double-height space, reinforcing the impression that you’re floating in the Midtown skyline.

Many of my colleagues complained about the building at first. There’s too much empty space in the newsroom, some groused; they missed the intimacy of the old one. The glass offices look sterile, and no one will use them, some said.

I suspect they’ll all adjust. One of the joys of working in an ambitious new building is that you can watch its personality develop. From week to week, you see more and more lone figures chatting on cellphones in the small glass offices with their feet atop a table. And even my grumpiest colleagues now concede that a little sunlight and fresh air are not a bad thing.

Even so, you never feel that the building embraces the future wholeheartedly. Rather than move beyond the past, Mr. Piano has fine-tuned it. The most contemporary features — the computerized louvers and blinds that regulate the flow of light into the interiors — are technological innovations rather than architectural ones; the regimented rows of identical wood-paneled cubicles chosen by the interior design firm Gensler could be a stage set for a 2007 remake of “All the President’s Men,” minus the 1970s hairstyles.

Maybe this accounts for the tower’s slight whiff of melancholy.

Few of today’s most influential architects buy into straightforward notions of purity or openness. Having witnessed an older generation’s mostly futile quest to effect social change through architecture, they opt for the next best thing: to expose, through their work, the psychic tensions and complexities that their elders sublimated. By bringing warring forces to the surface, they reason, a building will present a franker reading of contemporary life.

Journalism, too, has moved on. Reality television, anonymous bloggers, the threat of ideologically driven global media enterprises — such forces have undermined newspapers’ traditional mission. Even as journalists at The Times adjust to their new home, they worry about the future. As advertising inches decline, the paper is literally shrinking; its page width was reduced in August. And some doubt that newspapers will even exist in print form a generation from now.

Depending on your point of view, the Times Building can thus be read as a poignant expression of nostalgia or a reassertion of the paper’s highest values as it faces an uncertain future. Or, more likely, a bit of both.
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Old November 21st, 2007, 02:17 AM   #713
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Even after all these years, boxes are still the best buildings! they look so tall and provide for a city's atmosphere. Love it. Cant wait to go back and see it completed. when i left it was still being built.
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Old November 21st, 2007, 03:32 AM   #714
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The interior is is very nice. Crisp and simple.
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Old November 21st, 2007, 07:14 AM   #715
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http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...IC.html#/tab=2


That's the video in case anyone missed it. This building is iconic.
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Old November 21st, 2007, 08:19 PM   #716
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No place on earth like New York

Another fine skyscraper for New York City. Another trophy for NY's skyline.
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Old November 22nd, 2007, 03:30 AM   #717
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By therach488

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Old November 22nd, 2007, 01:06 PM   #718
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Nice pics, I love NY!!
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Old November 22nd, 2007, 01:12 PM   #719
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Looks like a shorter but more modern version of the original WTC1. I really like it.
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Old November 23rd, 2007, 11:34 AM   #720
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Italy architect unfazed by criticism over NYT's HQ

TURIN, Italy, Nov 22 (Reuters) - Italian architect Renzo Piano has shrugged off criticism over his design of the new headquarters for the New York Times, calling it healthy freedom of expression at the U.S. newspaper.

Times critic Nicolai Ouroussoff attacked Piano's 52-story glass-and-steel tower in Manhattan this week by saying it had a "menacing air" and "dull finish".

But Genoa-born Piano, who rose to international fame in the 1970s for sharing the design of the Pompidou Centre in Paris with British architect Richard Rogers, defended Ouroussoff's right to express his opinion.

"I know him (Ouroussoff) very well. He has often criticised my projects, sometimes more, sometimes less," Piano told reporters on the sideline of an event on Wednesday.

"But up with criticism and up with freedom! It's also interesting to see how at the New York Times an architecture critic can criticise his own paper."

Piano's international achievements range from the reconstruction of Berlin's Potsdamer Platz to the Kansai International Airport Terminal in Osaka, Japan.

His latest project, a skyscraper for Italian bank Intesa Sanpaolo in Turin, has also come under pressure as locals say it would ruin the city's skyline.

Set against the spectacular backdrop of the Italian Alps, Turin is dominated by the spiky 19th-century Mole Antonelliana, a 167-metre-high (550-feet-high) brick building that has become the city's hallmark.

"What really bothers me is to see some grotesque reproductions of the project," Piano said.

"My building is not, as someone has portrayed it, twice as tall as the Mole. It's 177-metres (584-feet) tall and the Alps are miles away. I don't understand what's the problem."

Piano said that he accepted the Turin project as he was intrigued by the possibility of making it an environmentally sustainable building. (Additional reporting by Lisa Jucca, editing by Paul Casciato)
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