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Old January 22nd, 2016, 10:14 AM   #2021
Tower Dude
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I Doubt that there is enough space between station and/or enough of the necessary trackage to for trains to run at 125 MPH I think they wanted the trains for the "tank strength" as well as better emissions standards and probably better acceleration
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Old January 22nd, 2016, 04:05 PM   #2022
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There are some pretty long stretches between stations. And the addition of express trains will create new opportunities for fast running. Furthermore, you have to understand that this is part of a combined order-other locomotives from this batch will be sent to do intercity service in California and the Midwest, where they WILL be going to their top speed. It is cheaper to not have to modify the design for commuter service.
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Old January 22nd, 2016, 06:30 PM   #2023
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Quote:
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Both. The F125 has all of the most stringent crash systems, and is more fuel-efficient.
That is a bit of a contradiction. If it were not designed to such escessively strict crash standards, it coul be substantially lighter and therefore also substentially more fuel efficient.

But I suppose that the train is fuel efficient given its weight, which is great of course. But I am at odds with the US mentality regarding train safety. I like to compare it to airplane safety. No one would demand a plan to be designed to survive a full speed crash, you demand tools that make a crash as unlikely as possible. Same should be done for trains. Invest in signalling and train control systems, locomotives don't need to be tanks, they are actually doing their best job for passangers safety if they are deforming a lot in case of a crash, as that consumes the energy way more than if the locomotive is more solid. (Sure the drivers life is at stake then, but that's the profesional risk you have and it isn't excessive, not greater than for a truck driver)

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Electrification is dependent more on frequency of trains and length of line. The British have been running 200 kph diesels since the 1970s.
And Britain is also known to be have one of the most rund down networks in Western Europe, because they almost destroyed it entirely with their privatization experiments some decades ago. Those corridors in the UK should have been switched to electric services long ago. But that's another story.

But you are right that there can be situations where 200 km/h servcies with diesel make sense. Low frequency of the sercie would be one possible reason, incompatibility with freight service could be another.

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There are some pretty long stretches between stations. And the addition of express trains will create new opportunities for fast running. Furthermore, you have to understand that this is part of a combined order-other locomotives from this batch will be sent to do intercity service in California and the Midwest, where they WILL be going to their top speed. It is cheaper to not have to modify the design for commuter service.
Yeah, a bit of a "one- ize fits most of it" order. I understand that, it can make certain things a lot easier. In Austria they did something similar with electric locomotives.
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Old January 22nd, 2016, 08:54 PM   #2024
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Quote:
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But I suppose that the train is fuel efficient given its weight, which is great of course. But I am at odds with the US mentality regarding train safety. I like to compare it to airplane safety. No one would demand a plan to be designed to survive a full speed crash, you demand tools that make a crash as unlikely as possible. Same should be done for trains. Invest in signalling and train control systems, locomotives don't need to be tanks, they are actually doing their best job for passangers safety if they are deforming a lot in case of a crash, as that consumes the energy way more than if the locomotive is more solid. (Sure the drivers life is at stake then, but that's the profesional risk you have and it isn't excessive, not greater than for a truck driver)
Ya that totally comes from America's railroad monopoly days, and by the time those days had left the cultural memory of the the american Citizens it was irrelevant because car culture was already in full swing. Now that there has been a rise in passenger rail traffic signaling is becoming a predominant safety system so passenger trains can travel faster. Although with the lack of such safety systems in light of recent grade crossing accidents caused by lack of grade separation and derailments caused by lack of proper signaling, american train passengers want to feel as if they are very well protected. By the way the consensus, at least as far has I have seen, on these forums has been that American railcar design should more closely mimic European Designs and standards
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Old January 23rd, 2016, 01:25 PM   #2025
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I agree. Pure freight rails are fine with the systems that are in place and Europe is really the last one that can tell the US anything about how to do successful freight rail (it is the other way round in fact). But if you want to revive passenger rail, tanks on rails are not the way to go, light builds in combination with a solide up to date signalling system is what is needed and people should demand it instead of that resource wasting and track destroying safety placebo that tank trains are.

I also agree with you that a passanger rail culture has to establish itself again, at least in parts of the US. Trying to cross before a snail speed freight train that needs half a day to cross the level crossing is simply something else than trying to cross before a higher speed passanger train. First of all, is the time saving effect much smaller is it has passed in a moment, also the energies envolved at a crash are much more destructive. So the risk is much higher while the gain is almost not there. People need to realize that and if they have troubles at realizing that, illegal crossing should be subject to very harsh fines, if really needed, going as far as loosing the driver's license temporarily. That should do the trick.
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Old January 28th, 2016, 05:11 AM   #2026
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A well-researched and well-written article about the possible reasons behind the public transit ridership slump in Southern California.

http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...127-story.html

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Old January 28th, 2016, 08:33 AM   #2027
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Metro plans to spend more than $12 billion over the next 10 years to build two new rail lines and three extensions, the largest capital investment of any transit agency in the country. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...127-story.html
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Old January 29th, 2016, 10:04 PM   #2028
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Per Metro's The Source blog, here are a handful of new Crenshaw Line station renders.

Century/Aviation:




Leimert Park (Crenshaw/Vernon):






Downtown Inglewood (Florence/La Brea):
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Old January 29th, 2016, 10:10 PM   #2029
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Very sleek and modern compared to the other lines. Nice.
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Old January 29th, 2016, 10:20 PM   #2030
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Agreed, I like the cleanliness of the look -- no funky hanging art pieces, just laser-cut sound panels and a couple spaces for murals. That aesthetic works well on the newly opening Expo and Gold Line stations.

My main notes to the rendering artists: 1) the Aviation/Century station displays should probably read "Crenshaw/Expo," "Redondo Beach" and "Norwalk" to better illustrate the way these lines are going to sync up, and 2) there sure are a lot of white folks milling around Inglewood and Leimert Park stations...
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Old January 30th, 2016, 07:50 PM   #2031
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I don't get the roof structures lacking a roof though. But that seems to be a common "design" thing in the US it seems.
Other than that, I think it is a nice, reduced design.
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Old January 30th, 2016, 10:55 PM   #2032
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And the roof is not extending above the track. You'll still get wet when boarding and alighting while it is raining.
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Old January 30th, 2016, 11:54 PM   #2033
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I think many transit agencies in areas with fair-ish weather are reluctant to have plenty of roofs for fear they'd become homeless gathering spots. Defensive architecture and all that. Not saying I agree or not, just pointing.

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What is the relationship between Metro and LOSSAN?
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Old January 31st, 2016, 01:44 PM   #2034
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That would explain the lack of roof, but not the roof structure without the roof.

Personally I think it is a stupid thing to do. Either you need those roofs for passanger comfort or not, if you need it, and you don't construct it, you are compromising passanger comfort in fear of homeless people. This is an above ground station, which means you can easily close it down at out of service times. And during service it is certainly no more attractive than an underground station, where you also can't just skip the roof ...
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Old January 31st, 2016, 04:31 PM   #2035
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Maybe there IS going to be roof there and they just removed that section on the render to allow a better view.
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Old January 31st, 2016, 06:12 PM   #2036
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Some of the pictures clearly show a glass roof
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Old January 31st, 2016, 10:03 PM   #2037
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It seems like LA is hopelessly sprawled and transit agencies will always struggle with that. Yet at the same time, LA is a bit more densely populated than a normal US suburb. So you'll always need a car but there will always be awful traffic. It's the worst of both worlds.

This kind of thing makes me wonder if Southern California and its entire model of suburban style expansion has reached a kind of natural limit to its growth. Which in turn makes me think of where Dallas could find itself 30 years from now.

While people can work in the suburbs they live in and access to the core doesn't totally matter, what is the point of being in the metro at all if the synergy of being close to everything the city has to offer breaks down with distance? It's like when Toyota's US headquarters moved to Dallas because of the cost of living for their employees and not just "taxes or regulations". Sure they could have packed up and moved to Perris or something but what would that accomplish if you could go somewhere nicer and similar to digs on the west side of the region but pay less?
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Old February 1st, 2016, 01:40 AM   #2038
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It seems like LA is hopelessly sprawled and transit agencies will always struggle with that. Yet at the same time, LA is a bit more densely populated than a normal US suburb.
A bit more? There's just a handful of US cities more densely populated than LA. Central LA has about one million people living in around 50 square miles. What suburbs are like that?
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Old February 1st, 2016, 01:50 AM   #2039
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None of the US Western metros are sprawled thin, compared to what you find in the South, the Midwest or the East Coast!

The issue is that Los Angeles is pretty big. In particular, county density is distorted because L.A. county encompasses a lot of desert and mountains.
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Old February 10th, 2016, 11:57 PM   #2040
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New express bus service (bus 501) begins 2016.03.01, connecting North Hollywood with Pasadena



https://www.metro.net/riding/line501/
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