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Old December 1st, 2007, 08:44 PM   #221
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http://www.metro-magazine.com/t_feat...fm?id=90511156

November/December 2007


Resurrecting L.A.'s Subway to the Sea
by Joan Shim

Los Angeles has made some headway in the effort to build a “subway to the sea,” which would extend the Metro Red Line from downtown to the Pacific Ocean via Wilshire Blvd. This would provide a vital connection between downtown Los Angeles and Santa Monica and alleviate traffic in the most congested city in the nation according to Texas Transportation Institute standards.

On Sept. 12, 2007, the Senate approved a bill that repeals an old ban on using federal monies for subway tunneling in the Wilshire Corridor.

“Today’s vote by the Senate brings us one step closer to bringing the long-awaited expansion of the Metro Red Line closer to reality,” Sen. Diane Feinstein, (D-Calif.) said. “It’s time to give the commuters of Los Angeles relief from the severe gridlock they face every day.”

The 1985 ban had been pushed through Congress by Rep. Henry Waxman, (D-Los Angeles), who deemed tunneling dangerous after a methane gas explosion at a local clothing store in the area.

But the issue came back onto the radar a few years ago, and the L.A. City Council passed a motion in 2004 to request a repeal of the ban. Then in 2005, the board of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) voted to renew discussions about the Wilshire subway. Later that year, L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Waxman convened an APTA peer review panel to reassess the possibility of tunneling in the methane gas area. The panel determined that tunneling in the Wilshire Corridor could be done safely. Convinced, Waxman put language into HR 4653 to lift the ban, and the bill was passed in the House in Sept. 2006.

Before the bill can be brought to the President for his signature, it must be reconciled with the House in conference and approved by an up-or-down vote by both congressional chambers.

Villaraigosa, who coined the name “subway to the sea,” said the Wilshire Blvd. corridor is the most-used corridor in Los Angeles for east-west traffic from downtown to the Westside, according to news reports. Villaraigosa believes the subway to the sea would be one of the most well-traveled transit systems in the nation.

Another Westside subway supporter is Denny Zane, former mayor of Santa Monica and executive director of the Subway to the Sea Coalition, a nonprofit group that is building support for the subway’s development and funding.

Of all the options, the Wilshire subway will have the greatest impact on congestion on the Westside and downtown, carrying twice the number of passengers as the current Wilshire bus system from downtown to the coast in Santa Monica in half the time,” Zane says. Along with the traffic relief, Zane says the subway would stimulate economic and housing development along the Wilshire corridor.

MTA conducting study
Anticipating a green light from the federal government, MTA is moving forward with a re-evaluation of the public transit needs on the Westside, a requisite step before any decisions are made.
“We had always been prohibited from studying any type of subway configuration out there,” said Rick Jager, senior communications representative for MTA. “We’re beginning the process of studying so that if money were to become available, and the Board as a whole wants to move forward, at least we’ve started that process.”

The Westside Extension Transit Corridor Study is looking at subway, light rail and bus modes as well as different alignments and segment lengths. All modes are equally viable at this point, according to Jager. The agency is considering two main alignments. The 13-mile Wilshire Blvd. route would start at the station on Wilshire and Western Ave. and end in downtown Santa Monica. The other alignment would be further north and roughly follow Santa Monica Blvd.
The study is expected to be completed by June 2008, and then the board will likely decide whether or not this project will be included in the MTA’s long range plan.


Funding hurdle
The problem of funding remains the biggest obstacle to getting this subway built. The MTA estimates that it will cost roughly $4 billion. And it will have to compete with all the other transit projects in the works.

“L.A. County has at least $30 billion in responsible transit projects on the list of highest performing options, and only $4 billion identified to pay for it,” Zane says.

To make matters worse, Zev Yaro¬slavksy, ( HIM AGAIN!!) an L.A. County Board of Supervisors member, spearheaded a measure in 1998 to prohibit the use of local sales tax dollars for subway construction. The measure passed.

The hope is that the federal government will help foot the bill for the subway. “With this language lifted on the federal side, hopefully we would go back to the federal government and see if they would fund a portion of the project,” says Jager.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Project History

Wilshire Boulevard is one of Los Angeles’ main thoroughfares and a vital artery for east-west traffic through the county. The corridor is densely populated and crosses several major business and cultural centers, including Downtown Los Angeles, Koreatown, Miracle Mile, Beverly Hills, Century City, Westwood and Santa Monica.
The city has considered a Wilshire subway since the 1980s. When voters passed Proposition A in 1980, which set aside a half-cent sales tax to help cover the cost of a regional transit system, a Wilshire subway from downtown to Fairfax Ave. was included in the plan. But other lines took precedence, funds ran short and opposition grew from Westside residents who didn’t want a transit system bringing in unwanted ‘outsiders.’

While the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority continued to build subways in the ‘90s, Rep. Henry Waxman’s legislation blocked the Wilshire subway — the Metro Red Line — at Western Ave. The final segment of the Red Line, which heads north and connects to North Hollywood and the San Fernando Valley, was built in 2000. The Wilshire segment to Western Ave. was renamed the “Purple Line.”


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Old December 2nd, 2007, 05:47 AM   #222
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I never rode the Metro rail when I was in Los Angeles earlier this month but I thought it looked impressive. How do these rail lines stand up to earthquakes? I bet they got some ideas from Japan.
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Old December 2nd, 2007, 08:42 PM   #223
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During the Northridge quake (that was the one that did some major damage to the I-10 viaduct downtown and the I-5 CA-14 interchange in the Newhall Pass) the Red Line had no apparent damage.

But of course, now that we're trying to extend the subway to Santa Monica under Wilshire, we're going to hear the same tired argument about subways in an earthquake prone area.
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Old December 3rd, 2007, 10:13 PM   #224
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Fare-collecting gates may come to stations in Los Angeles’s transit network, replacing an honor system
that not all riders honor.


An End to the Free Ride on Trains in Los Angeles

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
December 3, 2007

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 2 — It may be hard to fathom for subway riders in cities like New York, Chicago and Boston, but the transit system in Los Angeles has no turnstiles, gates or other barriers where tickets are collected or checked.

Under a proudly distinct honor system intended to buck East Coast practices and reduce operating costs, riders buy their tickets, get on the train and present them to a sheriff’s deputy or civilian inspector — if any happen to ask.

But after 14 years of trust, Los Angeles is preparing to join those cities where slipping past, under and over transit turnstiles and gates is an art form.

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board voted last week to take the first step toward installing 275 ticket gates on the entire 17.4-mile subway and at many light-rail stations.


A report found 5 percent of passengers did not buy tickets.

The move came after a study given to the board in October found that some 5 percent of people who rode the subway, light rail and a new rapid bus line on weekdays did so without paying the fare, $1.25 one way or $5 for a daily pass. As a result, the report said, the authority lost about $5.5 million in revenue annually.

Fare-collecting gates, which could cost $30 million to install and $1 million a year to maintain, would yield an extra $6.77 million in recovered fares and other savings, according to the report. The board voted 11 to 1 on Thursday to have staff members write a plan for installing the gates, with final approval expected in January.

Some saw the move as another sign of the shifting ecology of Los Angeles.

“Unfortunately, as L.A. gets to be more urban, it has these breakdowns of trust that happen in big cities,” said Joel Kotkin, a Los Angeles resident and author of “The City: A Global History.” “It’s the flip side of all the good things.”

At the Wilshire/Vermont station Friday, with a steady stream of people walking past vending machines and under a sign reading “Ticket required beyond this point,” riders who have looked suspiciously at their brethren applauded the move.

“We all should know and respect the law,” said Maria Cervantes, 43, a dressmaker buying a ticket at the station. “I see a lot of people just walk on, and I don’t think it is because they have the day or month pass.”


Jacob Holloway, a rider with a monthly pass shown at the Wilshire/Vermont station, said he wondered if the ticket
gates would take in more money than they cost to install and operate.


But other riders were skeptical, saying they had watched inspectors walk the trains checking tickets without catching many people.

“I would like to know if the money gained is really more than the money they are going to spend,” said Jacob Holloway, 24, a graphic designer with a monthly pass.

The board member who voted against the proposal, Richard Katz, shared the sentiment.

Mr. Katz, a former member of the California Assembly, said he feared that the turnstiles would impede evacuations in emergencies. He said he also doubted that the struggling agency could afford the cost, which he predicted would escalate and wipe out potential savings. The agency’s $3 billion budget is expected to have a $75 million deficit next year.

“Dollars are very tight,” Mr. Katz said.

But agency planners said that the gates would eventually pay for themselves and that something needed to be done to control scofflaws on the rapidly expanding system. The gates could also improve security and be used for smart cards, passes with computer chips in them that would make it more practical to charge distance-based fares and give riders more options to pay beforehand.

“We have grown substantially,” said Jane Matsumoto, a executive with the transportation authority who is working on the gate proposal. “But trying to enforce the numbers of riders over the large geography is difficult.”

Ms. Matsumoto said it would take about 18 months to phase in the gates.

The train system started in 1990 with a 22-mile light rail line from Long Beach to downtown Los Angeles. It added the Red Line subway in the 1990s, as well as several other light rail lines that now total some 90 miles. About 7.4 million people used the rail lines last month.

The American Public Transportation Association said the Los Angeles subway was the only one in the country that did not have a gated pay system, though other cities with newer and smaller light rail systems relied on the honor system to encourage ridership and to save on the cost of turnstiles and related expenses.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: New York Times
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Old December 24th, 2007, 06:08 PM   #225
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Deadline for L.A.'s subway to the sea is a literal one


By Steve Hymon, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
December 24, 2007

Let's begin with the quote of the week, courtesy of Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl:

"My plan is to be alive when the subway to the sea happens."

It's hard to knock such a plan. It may also be worth noting that Rosendahl is 62, and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics show that his life expectancy is about 81. In other words, subway proponents and Rosendahl should mark the year 2026 on their calendars.

Rosendahl's chances were increased last week when Congress repealed a ban on federal funding of subway tunneling in parts of the city. The repeal is part of a $516-billion appropriations bill that President Bush is expected to sign.

The repeal triggered a City Hall news conference at Union Station, where Rosendahl made his remarks, and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said he's working on a funding plan.

Attentive readers may recall that the subway-to-the-sea extension from its terminus at Wilshire Boulevard and Western Avenue to Santa Monica was one of the big promises Villaraigosa made during his 2005 campaign.

So why doesn't he have a funding plan already -- now that he's been in office more than 900 days?

I asked the mayor that question at the news conference. Here's his response:

"You'd rain on any parade, wouldn't you? Let me just say, Stevie -- and you're at your best when you're raining on parades. Let me explain something. . . . Tom Bradley ran for mayor and said he would get a subway in 18 months, and it took 18 years. Yet we all know him as the father of the subway . . .

"If this was so easy, someone would have done it a long time ago," the mayor added.

This, in fact, is a very fair point for the mayor to make. The ban on tunneling on the Westside was put in place 22 years ago out of safety concerns by Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills), who later changed his mind after new evidence showed that tunneling would be safe and credited the mayor with creating the momentum to get the ban repealed.

"I offered to reopen this issue 10 years ago," Waxman said. "But the MTA wasn't interested because they didn't have the money. The mayor said he wanted the option" to pursue the subway project.

And Waxman, added, the mayor was persuasive.

What's next?

The subway still is far from being approved by the board of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The only thing the MTA has approved so far is an in-progress study of whether a subway is the best option for Westside mass transit. It is also starkly clear that no one has $5 billion sitting around for a subway. At best, the federal government usually kicks in only half the cost of such projects, and a 1998 voters' prohibition on using local sales tax money for subway tunneling remains in place.

"It has to be repealed," said Councilman Tom LaBonge after the news conference. "No one in Congress is going to give us a dollar if it isn't."

More bad news. Previous sales tax money for the MTA already is earmarked for other projects. This is the reason LaBonge believes a parcel tax is needed, while his colleague Jack Weiss is pushing for a partnership with private firms to get the subway built.

And that's the million-dollar question, so to speak: Will local pols ask voters for any kind of tax increase?


The mayor won't say, although his office has explored the option in the past.

It will be interesting to see how this develops. The presidential election in November should offer the kind of high turnout that is needed to get a tax measure for this type of project passed. The thinking in political circles is the higher the turnout, the more mass transit users will vote.

The bet here, too, is that pols would go for a sales tax increase rather than a parcel tax -- which is often a great way to incite opposition from homeowners. That said, a sales tax increase would be controversial because Los Angeles County's sales tax is already among the highest in the state.

A half-penny sales tax hike also holds the promise of raising in the neighborhood of $500 million a year for transit projects, including the subway. Getting that kind of money would be a big score for politicians who like to talk about mass transit.

Councilwoman Wendy Greuel didn't say whether she would support a tax increase but offered this observation: "The best way to get support for mass transit is to actually build it."

Last edited by redspork02; December 24th, 2007 at 06:36 PM.
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Old December 24th, 2007, 06:33 PM   #226
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Metro Purple Line Could Be Extended To Ocean
President Bush Expected To Sign Federal Legislation Lifting Tunneling Ban



LOS ANGELES -- Local officials Thursday hailed federal legislation expected to be signed by President George W. Bush that would lift tunneling restrictions along Wilshire Boulevard, making it possible to extend the Metro Purple Line west and create a subway to the ocean.
"Twenty-one years ago, Washington derailed the hopes for a Westside subway, and today, we're back on track," said Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. "After more than two decades of waiting and planning, it's now time to take definitive action to ease traffic congestion on the Westside and improve the quality of life throughout L.A. County."

The repeal of the tunneling ban restriction is included in the 2008 Omnibus Appropriations bill approved by the U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday. If signed by Bush, it will overturn a ban originally authored in 1985 by Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, that prevented the Metro Red Line from being extended past Western Avenue.

Because of the ban, Metro had the line extend north to North Hollywood, creating a subway that was actually two lines.

Last year, the Metro Board agreed to rename the Metro Red Line between Union Station and Wilshire Boulevard and Western Avenue the Metro Purple Line.

That is the segment that could extend west thanks to the lifting of the tunneling ban, which was enacted when Waxman argued that possible methane explosions made tunneling in that area too dangerous. In 2005, an independent peer review panel determined the area was safe for tunneling.

That determination helped convince Waxman to author legislation lifting the ban.

"I'm glad that new technological developments have led to a new consensus that tunneling can be done safely," Waxman said. "I'm grateful that Congress has just approved my bill to repeal the 1985 restrictions and to allow Los Angeles to explore new options in meeting our city's traffic problems."

Despite the success in Washington, the "subway to the sea" is still far from a sure thing.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority board has yet to decide whether to move forward with plans to extend the subway. Villaraigosa and Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky have both supported the idea, but Supervisor Mike Antonovich has argued it would be too costly to complete.

The project would cost at least $5 billion and take 10 years to build. It would be by far the most expensive Metro line in Los Angeles County.

Villaraigosa has touted the route as a way to relieve traffic in one of the city's most congested areas, and as a way to give inner-city residents an easy way to reach the beach.
Copyright 2007 by KNBC.com and KNBC (NBC4 Los Angeles). All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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Old December 24th, 2007, 09:03 PM   #227
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10 years? Are they just using the rate of tunneling from the Red Line? I know that it can be done much faster
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Old April 21st, 2008, 06:26 AM   #228
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Hindsight

Back in the 40's, LA had some kind of trolly or light-rail system. They could have been expanding that system in 1950, or 1960 dollars.
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Old April 21st, 2008, 09:48 PM   #229
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westsidelife View Post
Nice to read slavery seemingly making its way back into 'merica, no?

Would a local LA'an please define the pictogram found in the bottom left corner in the photo just above here, please, coz its caption`s been cropped?

Come to think of it, does its (adjacent) neighbour mean to prohibit -- what -- dancing?
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Old April 21st, 2008, 09:49 PM   #230
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No shouting and skating i think.
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 09:27 AM   #231
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no excessive yelling (although most latino women dont know they are yelling) and no skating. Since common curtosy in most major cities isnt that common, signs like this exist. However, its still nothing compared to engrish signs
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 09:37 AM   #232
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriszwolle View Post
No shouting and skating i think.
Right on. It's common sense people...
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 09:47 PM   #233
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Quote:
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Since common curtosy in most major cities isnt that common
I disagree. I'd say your finding leans toward English-speaking areas, of which N 'merica's share's real bad . . . nothing else at all....



Quote:
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It's common sense people...
My sense is far from common -- the shrivelled contents of its mouth induced me into pitying it, actually . . .

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Old April 25th, 2008, 02:06 AM   #234
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is it really happening is it going to expand to the ocean soon?
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Old April 25th, 2008, 05:39 AM   #235
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Whats the overall ridership on LA's subway?
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Old April 26th, 2008, 02:54 AM   #236
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http://www.metro.net/news_info/ridership_avg.htm

That's for all of Metro, as for the Red Line, boardings seem to have reached an all time peak of 144,841 average weekday boarding for March.
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Old April 26th, 2008, 04:24 AM   #237
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^Why so low? A 28 Km subway line should have alot more than that.
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Old April 26th, 2008, 04:29 AM   #238
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There are not as many connections as there could be. That line goes to Hollywood, downtown, and that's about it. There is no subway along along the most important corridor in LA (Wilshire Blvd), and most lines will stay with relatively low numbers until that is done. Also, you have to think that a huge portion of that line is commuters from the SFV to Hollywood and downtown.

This is still LA remember, and many are addicted to their cars.
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Old April 26th, 2008, 06:25 AM   #239
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I find this astonishing. In Toronto the Bloor-Danforth line is 27.5 Km long and attracted 478,790 boardings per week day in 2006.
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Old May 10th, 2008, 11:07 PM   #240
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I didn't even know LA had a metro.

I hope it will continue to grow in ridership and the metro expands to other parts of the city.
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