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Old November 15th, 2009, 05:06 PM   #461
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What happened with extension of golden line to East LA? Opening was proposed for today november 15th 2009.

Are there plans for putting this tunnel in function by next years?
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Old November 15th, 2009, 05:27 PM   #462
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The Gold line extension is opening today, remember it's still only half past seven in the morning over there :p
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Old November 15th, 2009, 05:39 PM   #463
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onetwothree View Post
The Gold line extension is opening today, remember it's still only half past seven in the morning over there :p
Indeed it is.

Also, the red car conspiracy wasn't also as much of a conspiracy as people make it to be. The government had already forced streetcar systems to be separated from power companies and real estate interests so their sole income would be from fares, which were held to 5 cents well into the 30s and maybe longer. That coupled with the rise of GM led to the demise of the cars and GM was happy to fill the void.
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Old November 15th, 2009, 08:23 PM   #464
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Los Angeles had two streetcar systems, the Pacific Electric (Red Cars) and the Los Angeles Railway (Yellow Cars). National City Lines, which had business ties to General Motors, Standard Oil, Phillips Petroleum, and Firestone, took ownership of only the Los Angeles Railway (Yellow Cars). The Pacific Electric (Red Cars) was owned for a time by Metropolitan Coach Lines. In 1958, both systems were taken over by a government agency, the Metropolitan Transit Authority. Streetcar operation for the Red Cars ended in 1961. Streetcar operation for the Yellow Cars ended in 1963.

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Old November 15th, 2009, 08:30 PM   #465
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The Pacific Electric (Red Car) subway tunnel cannot be rehabilitated for transit use. The tunnel is now obstructed by the foundation of the Bonaventure Hotel.
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Old November 15th, 2009, 11:22 PM   #466
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The Gold Line opens Today

The six-mile light-rail extension, which cost $898 million, will open Today with free rides and entertainment.

George Raya is at the controls of a light-rail train as it travels through the underground portion of the new Gold Line Eastside Extension. (Al Seib, Los Angeles Times / November 11, 2009)
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Recalling the Yellow Cars while riding the Gold Line extension
Molina is critical of MTA Eastside extension's rollout

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November 13, 2009
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What is the Gold Line Eastside extension?

It's the latest light-rail line in Los Angeles County, running six miles from downtown L.A. through Boyle Heights and into East Los Angeles. When it opens to the public on Sunday, the Gold Line will run from Pasadena to East L.A. The Eastside extension cost $898 million to build. Construction began in 2004.

How many stations are there?

There are eight stations along the extension's route: Atlantic, East L.A. Civic Center, Maravilla, Indiana, Soto, Mariachi Plaza, Pico/Aliso and Little Tokyo/Arts District. The extension terminates at Union Station, where riders can connect to the Red Line subway or the Purple Line or stay on the Gold Line to Pasadena.

Why is the Gold Line not a subway?

From the beginning, residents and politicians on the Eastside pushed for the Gold Line extension to be built completely underground. In the end, transportation planners decided to make a roughly 1.7-mile portion of the Gold Line a subway -- the part that runs underneath Boyle Heights. The majority of the route runs above ground.

What is planned for the grand opening?

Everyone can ride the Gold Line from one end to the other at no cost on Sunday. At the East L.A. Civic Center station, there will be live music, a farmers market and activities for children. There will also be live mariachi and contemporary music -- including the group Quinto Sol -- at the Mariachi Plaza station. The Little Tokyo/Arts District station will host karaoke and food from nearby restaurants. And Santa Claus will visit Union Station more than a month early.

What are the ridership projections?

By the end of the first year it is open, officials expect 13,000 people to ride the extension each day.

What are the safety concerns about the Gold Line?

Some people, including Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina, have expressed concern about pedestrians near the light-rail line, which runs through heavily populated areas. Molina has said the line would have been much safer underground.

But MTA officials said the line is safe. They noted that the agency set aside an additional $4.5 million for safety enhancements, including about two miles of pedestrian fencing. Two dozen "safety ambassadors" will help residents navigate tricky spots on the line. Los Angeles police, the California Highway Patrol and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officials will be on the lookout for people jaywalking over the tracks.

What are some basic safety tips when driving in the area?

Here are tips from the MTA: (1) Exercise caution at all times. Watch for the "Train" signal. (2) Always wait for a "walk" signal before entering the crosswalk. (3) Always use the crosswalk. Never jaywalk across the tracks. (4) Never make a left turn on a red arrow. This will be enforced by cameras at each intersection. (5) Right turns are allowed while a Gold Line train is passing through but may be restricted at certain intersections.

Didn't workers digging the subway tunnel find artifacts?

Yes. In 2005, workers found markers of Chinese workers buried near the Evergreen Cemetery more than a century ago. Chinese headstones and burial bricks were found between 2 and 6 feet underground. They were scattered among the remains of the 128 bodies. Chinese American historians said the find shed light on the earliest Chinese immigrants who came to California to help build the railroads and perform other jobs.

What's next for the Gold Line?

Officials are hoping for two new extensions in the coming years. One would go from Pasadena east as far as Ontario International Airport. The other would go east from East L.A. to either Whittier or South El Monte.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 05:43 AM   #467
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With today's (Nov. 15) East LA extension inauguration, this is what LA's METRO system looks like. Except the "Expo" Aqua Line which is under construction.



Los Angeles Times coverage...................

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK

An extension of more than the Gold Line
Sunday's opening of eight new Metro stations on a path from downtown to East L.A. lays down tracks toward an exciting future.




The Gold Line extension's opening gives the feeling that things are looking up for mass transit in L.A. Here's a look back up toward the street from the underground track at one of the two new subterranean stops. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)







It would be tough to overstate the level of cynicism that exists in certain corners of the Los Angeles establishment about the future of mass transit in Southern California. For many power brokers and longtime observers of the political scene, disparaging the chances of the region ever putting together a comprehensive transit system is some combination of rhetorical tic and parlor game.

In fact, the progress we've already made on a subway and light-rail network -- full of delays and misjudgments as it has been -- is remaking the physical and psychological terrain of Los Angeles in some profound ways. As more neighborhoods and landmarks are brought into transit's orbit, their relationship to the rest of the city and region shifts, giving us a powerful means of seeing the built environment with fresh eyes.

From that point of view, the opening on Sunday of the eight new Metropolitan Transportation Authority stations that make up the Gold Line extension -- six above ground and two below, reaching south and then east from Union Station into Little Tokyo, Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles -- is among the most significant civic milestones the city has reached in several years.

Design effects

The design of the new stops, overseen by architect Frank Villalobos and the firm AECOM, is in general more refined than the first stretch of the Gold Line, which opened in 2003 and in some stations delivers commuters directly into a narrow corridor squeezed between howling lanes of the 210 Freeway. But none is world-beating or likely to become a landmark in its own right.

A few show the pitfalls of earnestness, not to mention the deadening effect of endless design-review meetings at the bureaucratic and neighborhood level. (Does every station need to be a consensus-tested expression of community pride? I confess I'm not convinced.)

Among the above-ground stops in particular, less is definitely more: The stations that work best tend to be the ones that promote a fluid, easy connection between sidewalk and platform.

The real significance of the stations' debut on Sunday flows, instead, from the fact that with every substantial extension of the rail and subway network -- and this is a major one, with a price tag of $898 million, a large chunk of it to pay for 1.8 miles of underground tunneling -- another piece of the future Los Angeles comes startlingly into focus. More transit means more pedestrians, more people who pay attention to the shape and design of the city up close. That, in turn, means a growing constituency for shared space in Los Angeles and new interest in our long-neglected streetscapes and public sphere.

To put it another way: Transit and the life of the street are inextricably intertwined, and a boost to one is almost always a boost to the other.

At the same time, as trains trace new paths across the city, some of the divisions that for generations have made Los Angeles a balkanized collection of neighborhoods may begin to wobble or fall away.

That's not to say that some homogenization of L.A.'s various parts is on its way or should be our goal. Quite the opposite: New transit lines tend to throw the vibrant differences among neighborhoods into high relief.

Connecting a city

And yet they also promote a new sense of connectivity and fluidity in how we put the city and region together in our minds. In this case, by extending the Gold Line a mere six miles, Metro has woven new urban connections among downtown, Little Tokyo, the banks of the L.A. River, Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles.

The arts district has a different, arguably closer relationship with Little Tokyo. Commuters will better understand, simply by seeing this landscape out the train window, how improvements to Boyle Heights relate to plans to remake the banks of the river.

A similar batch of interrelationships will be forged each time Metro expands further: as the Expo Line moves south and west into Culver City and then Santa Monica, and as the Gold Line's Foothill Extension stretches east through the San Gabriel Valley. The fact that the underground section of the Gold Line was built without incident or cost overruns may help tamp down lingering doubts about the logistics of building the Subway to the Sea extension west along Wilshire Boulevard.

After Villalobos and AECOM handled the preliminary architecture of the new stations, each one was then handed off for final design to a separate architect-artist team. The standout designs are the two at the eastern end of the extension.

The Atlantic Station, by AECOM architects Todd Osborne and Russell McCarley and the artist group Adobe L.A., pairs a series of sail-like canopies with colored-cement benches and a lacquered, floridly painted robot sculpture at its western entrance.

The East L.A. Civic Center station, by Villalobos with artist Clement Hanami, suggests a row of blooming poppies and adds a burst of bright color to its stretch of 3rd Street.

Each of the two underground stations, meanwhile -- the cerulean-blue Soto Station by architect Aziz Kohan and artist Nobuho Nagasawa, and Mariachi Plaza Station by architect William Villalobos and artist Alejandro de la Loza -- is a tri-level design that adds a sizable new public plaza at street level. The visible coordination between art, architecture and signage at the stations -- and even the perforated-metal bicycle lockers built at or near a number of the them -- is a direct result of Metro's decision several years ago to create its own design studio, which now has a staff of more than 20.

Economic force

The Gold Line extension has also produced a number of important urban ripple effects. Several transit-oriented commercial and residential developments, including some planned for land owned by Metro immediately adjacent to the new stations, remain stalled by the poor economy; but other important changes to the route served by the train have already been completed or are underway, including the repaving of 3rd Street, the widening of the First Street Bridge and the construction of a pair of public high schools.

The extension has also managed to reawaken the potential of the Museum of Contemporary Art's Geffen Contemporary building. Still among the most underrated art-world designs of Frank Gehry's career, the warehouse building has been closed for 10 months as the museum struggled with financial woes.

But now, as the Geffen reopens in time to hold one segment of a major new exhibition of MoCA's permanent collection, it does so with a new Metro stop directly across Alameda Street -- and to find itself as central, if not more so, to the cultural and geographical makeup of Los Angeles than the main MoCA building on Grand Avenue.

Sightseeing tour

In the broadest sense, particularly because most of the new route is above ground, the Gold Line extension provides a number of ways to consider anew the city's architecture.

Along with the Geffen and City Hall, the buildings visible from the train include Rafael Moneo's Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels; Coop Himmelblau's Central High School No. 9; Gilbert Stanley Underwood's twin-domed Terminal Annex Post Office; Dodger Stadium; Thom Mayne and Morphosis' Caltrans District 7 Headquarters; and along First and Third streets a horizontal panorama of vernacular architecture including pink-stucco bungalows, car-detailing shops, taco stands and signs for Jewish, Serbian, Catholic and Chinese cemeteries.

Perhaps the most dramatic architectural views are the changing vistas of the downtown skyline that come into view as you move west on the new route from Boyle Heights and across the river and then as the train navigates a tight S-curve over the Hollywood Freeway and its dense field of red brake lights.

Many of those same views have long been available by car or bus or on foot, of course. But there is something more memorable -- more liberating, even -- about seeing them from a train running along dedicated tracks, floating free of capricious traffic.

[email protected]

latimes.com

Copyright © 2009, The Los Angeles Times

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...,4084107.story

Soto Station

( Al Seib / Los Angeles Times )
Artwork at the street entrance to the underground track at this Metro Gold Line stop has a bird motif.

Mariachi Plaza Station

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
The colorful street-level entrance pops out in Boyle Heights.

(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
The famed Mariachi Plaza cupola, and the Gold Line station.

(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Mariachi Plaza.

(Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)
Inside the Mariachi Plaza cupola.

Mariachi Plaza Station

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Little Tokyo/Arts District Station

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
This is the first stop on the extension from Union Station.

East L.A. Civic Center Station

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
The art here represents the state's official flower, the California poppy.

Atlantic Station

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
Meet the eastern terminus of the six-mile Gold Line extension.

Operator

(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
George Raya is at the controls of a Metro Gold Line train. Nearly one-third of the six-mile extension (1.8 miles, to be exact) runs underground.

Downtonw approach


(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)
George Raya guides a Metro Gold Line train back west on the Gold Line extension.

Last edited by Kenni; November 16th, 2009 at 06:03 AM.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 05:49 AM   #468
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Los Angeles Times



Q & A
The Gold Line opens Sunday
The six-mile light-rail extension, which cost $898 million, will open Sunday with free rides and entertainment.
Gold Line



George Raya is at the controls of a light-rail train as it travels through the underground portion of the new Gold Line Eastside Extension. (Al Seib, Los Angeles Times / November 11, 2009)





What is the Gold Line Eastside extension?


It's the latest light-rail line in Los Angeles County, running six miles from downtown L.A. through Boyle Heights and into East Los Angeles. When it opens to the public on Sunday, the Gold Line will run from Pasadena to East L.A. The Eastside extension cost $898 million to build. Construction began in 2004.

How many stations are there?

There are eight stations along the extension's route: Atlantic, East L.A. Civic Center, Maravilla, Indiana, Soto, Mariachi Plaza, Pico/Aliso and Little Tokyo/Arts District. The extension terminates at Union Station, where riders can connect to the Red Line subway or the Purple Line or stay on the Gold Line to Pasadena.

Why is the Gold Line not a subway?

From the beginning, residents and politicians on the Eastside pushed for the Gold Line extension to be built completely underground. In the end, transportation planners decided to make a roughly 1.7-mile portion of the Gold Line a subway -- the part that runs underneath Boyle Heights. The majority of the route runs above ground.

What is planned for the grand opening?

Everyone can ride the Gold Line from one end to the other at no cost on Sunday. At the East L.A. Civic Center station, there will be live music, a farmers market and activities for children. There will also be live mariachi and contemporary music -- including the group Quinto Sol -- at the Mariachi Plaza station. The Little Tokyo/Arts District station will host karaoke and food from nearby restaurants. And Santa Claus will visit Union Station more than a month early.

What are the ridership projections?

By the end of the first year it is open, officials expect 13,000 people to ride the extension each day.

What are the safety concerns about the Gold Line?

Some people, including Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina, have expressed concern about pedestrians near the light-rail line, which runs through heavily populated areas. Molina has said the line would have been much safer underground.

But MTA officials said the line is safe. They noted that the agency set aside an additional $4.5 million for safety enhancements, including about two miles of pedestrian fencing. Two dozen "safety ambassadors" will help residents navigate tricky spots on the line. Los Angeles police, the California Highway Patrol and Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officials will be on the lookout for people jaywalking over the tracks.

What are some basic safety tips when driving in the area?

Here are tips from the MTA: (1) Exercise caution at all times. Watch for the "Train" signal. (2) Always wait for a "walk" signal before entering the crosswalk. (3) Always use the crosswalk. Never jaywalk across the tracks. (4) Never make a left turn on a red arrow. This will be enforced by cameras at each intersection. (5) Right turns are allowed while a Gold Line train is passing through but may be restricted at certain intersections.

Didn't workers digging the subway tunnel find artifacts?

Yes. In 2005, workers found markers of Chinese workers buried near the Evergreen Cemetery more than a century ago. Chinese headstones and burial bricks were found between 2 and 6 feet underground. They were scattered among the remains of the 128 bodies. Chinese American historians said the find shed light on the earliest Chinese immigrants who came to California to help build the railroads and perform other jobs.

What's next for the Gold Line?

Officials are hoping for two new extensions in the coming years. One would go from Pasadena east as far as Ontario International Airport. The other would go east from East L.A. to either Whittier or South El Monte.

[email protected]

Copyright © 2009, The Los Angeles Times

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,3095130.story


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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:01 AM   #469
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Recalling the Yellow Cars while riding the Gold Line extension
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...0,145997.story



Molina is critical of MTA Eastside extension's rollout
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,5845354.story


All aboard for a tour of Little Tokyo and East L.A. Next stop: foodie nirvana

http://www.latimes.com/features/food...,4084038.story
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Old November 16th, 2009, 06:08 AM   #470
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transitpeople, flickr


treansitpeople, flickr


transitpeople, flickr


transitpeople, flickr
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Old November 16th, 2009, 07:31 AM   #471
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The amount and quality of the art installed at the stations is quite amazing. This is what I really miss in my hometown's system. Congrats LA.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 07:49 AM   #472
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deasine View Post
The amount and quality of the art installed at the stations is quite amazing. This is what I really miss in my hometown's system. Congrats LA.
Thanks The Red Line stations in my opinion are the best, especally the ones in Hollywood. There's pics here on previous pages.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:28 AM   #473
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LA's METRO AQUA LINE (under construction)

Here are some very interesting pictures of the advancement of the Aqua Line (Expo Line).

There is much more progress then what I expected.

AQUA LINE (CLICK ON EACH PICTURE)
http://www.buildexpo.org/gallery-pictures.php

RENDERINGS
http://www.buildexpo.org/gallery-renderings.php

Last edited by Kenni; November 16th, 2009 at 10:58 PM.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 05:35 PM   #474
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Old November 16th, 2009, 10:09 PM   #475
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soup or man View Post
Great video, besides Molina's b*******'. I love her schizophrenia: I brought the Gold Line/it's not safe!/It shoulda been a subway. Although fencing for the line is a good idea, and quad gates if they do not restrict traffic too much.

Anyway, cheers to the Gold Line Eastside Extension Linea de Oro Edward R. Roybal etc. Line.
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Old November 16th, 2009, 11:01 PM   #476
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAmarODom420 View Post
Great video, besides Molina's b*******'. I love her schizophrenia: I brought the Gold Line/it's not safe!/It shoulda been a subway. Although fencing for the line is a good idea, and quad gates if they do not restrict traffic too much.

Anyway, cheers to the Gold Line Eastside Extension Linea de Oro Edward R. Roybal etc. Line.
I do understand her concern tho, if you've ever driven through East Los Angeles you would see how populated it is, and the sheer number of pedestrians is high. And it is mostly Hispanic (like myself), and its natural that elderly Hispanics some who don't read and speak English would have trouble with the Signals, Signs and flashing lights.

What a great day for LA tho! I'm exited about our city's public transportation future.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 02:50 AM   #477
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From SSP:

Quote:
Originally Posted by WonderlandPark View Post
the route that opened, 8 stations, 2 underground
image hosted on flickr


Union Station, this was early Sunday, before the big crowds hit
image hosted on flickr


New Breda P2550 train pulls into Union Station, Atlantic designates the final stop on the Gold Line
image hosted on flickr


train (you can make out its shadow) crossing the 101 freeway
image hosted on flickr


The signature station is probably the Mariachi Plaza station.
image hosted on flickr

interior view
image hosted on flickr

interior view

image hosted on flickr


platform views at Mariachi

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


exiting the station:
image hosted on flickr


the great canopy at the entrance:
image hosted on flickr


artwork & canopy:
image hosted on flickr


view down the tunnel:
image hosted on flickr


Exterior of Soto station, the other underground station on the Gold Line:
image hosted on flickr


Soto is a smaller station than Mariachi, but has some great artwork installations:
image hosted on flickr


the glowing egg:
image hosted on flickr


Train in motion at Soto Station:
image hosted on flickr


East Side Civic Center, ceremonies and station views:

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



end of the line, Atlantic (maybe in a decade or so, this line will continue to be extended east, but its just a plan for now)
image hosted on flickr


Hopefully this gets built: its the "downtown connector" and will better connect the Gold Line with the Blue line, right now it takes 3 trains to traverse downtown, blue to red to gold lines.
image hosted on flickr
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Old November 17th, 2009, 03:10 AM   #478
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kenni View Post
I do understand her concern tho, if you've ever driven through East Los Angeles you would see how populated it is, and the sheer number of pedestrians is high. And it is mostly Hispanic (like myself), and its natural that elderly Hispanics some who don't read and speak English would have trouble with the Signals, Signs and flashing lights.

What a great day for LA tho! I'm exited about our city's public transportation future.
The concern should be capacity as well as safety. Los Angeles is building a network of light rail lines that will very quickly be at their design capacity. The Blue Line is already considered to be at capacity during rush hour. The Expo/Aqua Line is expected to be at capacity the day it reaches Santa Monica. This could also be the case with the Gold Line as it is extended eastward at both ends.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 09:15 AM   #479
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
The concern should be capacity as well as safety. Los Angeles is building a network of light rail lines that will very quickly be at their design capacity. The Blue Line is already considered to be at capacity during rush hour. The Expo/Aqua Line is expected to be at capacity the day it reaches Santa Monica. This could also be the case with the Gold Line as it is extended eastward at both ends.
You're right.

I've shun my car many times and taken the METRO, and the Blue Line is almost at that point, hmm the Red Line too at rush hour.

I read that the Blue Line is only second nationwide to Boston's Light Rail in passenger numbers.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 04:06 PM   #480
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Plus, Boston's LRT is more like a network of several lines, while the Blue is a single route. If anything it should take the title of being the busiest light rail.
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