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Old August 5th, 2011, 12:07 AM   #741
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Old August 5th, 2011, 03:10 AM   #742
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The Eastside Gold Line would easily get from Union Station to Atlantic in 20-25 minutes and possibly less despite it's street running if it weren't for those damn out-of-sync traffic signals.
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Old September 5th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #743
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L.A. has second best bus system in the country after NYC. 1.1 million people use it everyday. And if our mayor's 30/10 plan is successful, L.A. could have the best public transportation system on the western U.S. within 10 years.

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Old September 5th, 2011, 03:23 AM   #744
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L.A. has second best bus system in the country after NYC. 1.1 million people use it everyday. And if our mayor's 30/10 plan is successful, L.A. could have the best public transportation system on the western U.S. within 10 years.
It's extensive Rapid, Express and Limited Stop Bus(including Munis, like the BBB Rapid 3,7 and 10, Culver City Rapid 6, FT Silver Streak, etc) system is what really makes LA buses great. I would really like to see major, heavy Rapids upgraded to something like the NYC +SelectBusService with dedicated bus lanes and off-board fare-payment at ticket machines. (The investment is worth it for the most major ones, as no one is denying that the 720 isn't going anywhere, but you can't say the same for other Rapids)

I also like how Munis play a more major role in the metropolitan area. The problem I see with New York, is that EVERYTHING is run by ONE company. Bus, Train, Commuter Rail, AND Bridges. So if this ONE company goes broke, EVERYTHING goes to $hit. This maybe be needed, as NYC's transportation network is so huge, but I like how things are setup in LA. The only disadvantage is in NYC you don't have to worry about having 5 different passes for 5 different Munis EACH with their own fare.(Though with the EZ Transit Pass, Metrolink Tickets being valid on LA buses including Munis, and each muni accepting each other's transfer, this is not really an issue)

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Old September 5th, 2011, 11:01 AM   #745
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I agree with you State. What makes other cities transportation system great (like NYC, London, Paris) is options. Those cities have the option of either taking the subway, the bus, or the taxi. In L.A., the only option we have is the bus (our main source of transportation) and our subway system which is limited right now.

What I think L.A. needs to do is allow people to hail taxis throughout the city. Put a lot more taxis on the streets. I think it would be a excellent complement to the 30/10 project when it's finished.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 07:52 AM   #746
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Construction begins on last leg of Expo Line

The $1.5-billion second phase will run 6.6 miles to Colorado Avenue and 4th Street in downtown Santa Monica. At a groundbreaking ceremony, officials proclaim a different future for Westside commuters.

Traffic crawled at an infuriating pace Monday morning on the 10 Freeway.

But at a groundbreaking ceremony for the last leg of the Expo light rail line to Santa Monica, dozens of Southland officials gathered to proclaim a different future.

"People get stuck coming into this area in the morning to go to work … and get stuck going home when they leave," L.A. County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky said at the ceremony in the beach city. The Expo Line is "not going to solve the traffic problems of the Westside, but it's going to give people an alternative to being stuck with the problems on the Westside."

Construction of the first phase of the Expo Line, an 8.6-mile stretch from the downtown 7th Street/Metro Center station to Culver City, has been underway since 2006 and is slowly nearing completion. The $1.5-billion second phase will continue 6.6 miles west to Colorado Avenue and 4th Street, about a half-mile from the ocean.



Transportation officials hope to open the full line sometime in 2015 and say they will be able to shuttle commuters the entire 15.2 miles in a reliable 46 minutes. A shortened segment of the first phase is planned to open near the end of the year, with the entire first phase to Culver City scheduled for completion in early 2012.

The Expo Line will be the first to penetrate the often-gridlocked Westside since streetcars crisscrossed the region. Officials estimate its ridership will rival that of the heavily used Blue Line from Long Beach to downtown L.A., and said it could become one of the busiest rail lines in the country.

"It's the best day we've had in transportation in 50 years for the Westside," said L.A. City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, one of several speakers at the ceremony.

"It means jobs, real jobs, right here," said County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. Santa Monica Mayor Richard Bloom surveyed the skyline surrounding the vacant lot where the ceremony was held and rattled off proposed housing, business and recreation projects the line could help advance.

"It is transformative," Bloom said. "The light rail coming in, and the number of passengers it's going to carry and the change it's going to make."

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,2908842.story
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Old September 13th, 2011, 09:38 AM   #747
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in a couple months, LA will have the following under construction at the same time

1) Expo Phase 1 (Currently U/C, in testing will open in next 3 months)
2) Expo Phase 2 (Construction starts today)
3) Gold Line Foothill Extension (Major Construction starts in soon)
4) Crenshaw Line (starting soon)
5) Orange Line BRT Extension (under construction)
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Old September 13th, 2011, 09:58 PM   #748
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Nice to see a lot of progress in LA! What about the Westside extension? I've heard they're doing a lot of mediation and stuff like that atm. Is there already a date for the construction to start?
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Old September 14th, 2011, 01:47 AM   #749
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i believe if all goes to plan, the purple line extension will break ground late next year or early 2013.
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Old September 14th, 2011, 02:07 AM   #750
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Quote:
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Other than being sandwiched by expressway lanes, the line appears well-conceived
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Old September 16th, 2011, 03:41 AM   #751
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Its good that LA is getting a good metro/light rail network. Think its weird that a big city like LA never had a mass public rail network.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 03:53 AM   #752
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Its good that LA is getting a good metro/light rail network. Think its weird that a big city like LA never had a mass public rail network.
Not only did we have one, it was over 1000 miles large. And sadly, all of those miles were shut down by 1960. Very disappointing stuff, but at least we are trying to recuperate some of it back.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 08:06 PM   #753
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Not only did we have one, it was over 1000 miles large. And sadly, all of those miles were shut down by 1960. Very disappointing stuff, but at least we are trying to recuperate some of it back.
Those were mostly streetcars that operated at financial losses by developers of (then) far flung suburbs of Los Angeles. And, frankly, the streetcars were mostly slow, and couldn't provide any fast link.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 12:22 AM   #754
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Those were mostly streetcars that operated at financial losses by developers of (then) far flung suburbs of Los Angeles. And, frankly, the streetcars were mostly slow, and couldn't provide any fast link.
Yeah, they operated at a loss. No wonder considering the late owner. Yes streetcars aren't that fast, but there was a two tier system in LA and not exclusively tramways.

Of course it pays off greatly to destroy a large already existing transport network. Right? Now they rediscover the upsides of such a system and invest a fortune to reactivate only parts of the old system. But as far as I know you, you certainly hate that idea anyway.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 06:02 AM   #755
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Those were mostly streetcars that operated at financial losses by developers of (then) far flung suburbs of Los Angeles. And, frankly, the streetcars were mostly slow, and couldn't provide any fast link.
Not so fast, Streetcars are considered a local form of transit anyway, so they are more comparable to a local bus. However, there were two different streetcars:The local streetcars(i.e. the Yellow Cars) while Pacific Electric ran on Private ROWs that functioned as an early form of light rail.(Even PE cars could be coupled together, like LRT) In fact, the current Blue Line follows exactly the same route of the old PE Long Beach-LA line.

If this system was not destroyed, you can easily that we could have had a huge LRT system where the only cost would have been upgrading the platforms and electrical systems to use modern LRVs. This cost of upgrading would be a fraction of a fraction of the cost of building new lines from scratch in this modern age of inflation where everything cost hundreds of millions of dollar just for 1 mile of track.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #756
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Yeah, they operated at a loss. No wonder considering the late owner. Yes streetcars aren't that fast, but there was a two tier system in LA and not exclusively tramways.
Of course it pays off greatly to destroy a large already existing transport network. Right? Now they rediscover the upsides of such a system and invest a fortune to reactivate only parts of the old system. But as far as I know you, you certainly hate that idea anyway.[/QUOT

The old streetcars run mostly in the middle of the freaking boulevards without any physical segregation. Their stops were merely small bays, or nothing whatsoever.

Had Los Angeles kept their streetcar lines, the system would look like one of Milan: annoyingly slow, old tracks, 3.449 conflicts with vehicular and pedestrian traffic, lack of modern safety measures like fences and ramps at stops, or light-rail specific traffic signs coordinated by an operational center that gives them priority etc. etc. etc. In other words: to have something like the Golden Line, they'd have to spend money anyway, even if older tracks were in place. And the result would likely been a lower-performing system because they wouldn't be able to close a working line to reconstruct it for 3 years.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 08:39 PM   #757
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suburbanist, did you even read the post above yours?

the pacific electric did possess ROWs, even if many of them weren't implemented.

you're always going on about the futility of mass transit, usually by saying things like: "if people did the stupid thing... bad results would occur."

what if the tracks were kept, and ROWs and grade separation ensued? what if funds were put into rail and not roads? what if the land speculators had not completely subverted the urban planning process and LA had initially spent more on infrastructure and didn't end up being a sprawling mess?
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Old September 17th, 2011, 08:51 PM   #758
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suburbanist, did you even read the post above yours?

the pacific electric did possess ROWs, even if many of them weren't implemented.

you're always going on about the futility of mass transit, usually by saying things like: "if people did the stupid thing... bad results would occur."

what if the tracks were kept, and ROWs and grade separation ensued? what if funds were put into rail and not roads? what if the land speculators had not completely subverted the urban planning process and LA had initially spent more on infrastructure and didn't end up being a sprawling mess?
Than LA Metro would be a place as expensive as they Bay Area to live.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 08:58 PM   #759
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*sighs*

use "then", not "than".

onto the main piece.

much of the price is due to land speculation. since capital gains are taxed at much lower rates than actual labor and consumption, many of the neoliberal economies have seen huge asset price booms. you may not make much as a worker in LA (and most other places) but you pay through the nose for housing and rent and basically anything requiring a mortgage.

LA is expensive, damn expensive. one of the reasons for its very high costs are the cost of building and maintaining such sprawling infrastructure, the roads, water pipes, electrical grid, sewers, extra costs for emergency services, etc. Another is simply the cost of gasoline and the extra costs for cars that have to be driven a lot.

You might not want to admit it (and you won't), but the single-family, car dependent way of building is the MOST expensive type of development.
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Old September 17th, 2011, 09:08 PM   #760
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Than LA Metro would be a place as expensive as they Bay Area to live.
Oh give me a break. The Bay Area is expensive because there is a limited supply of housing and land due to the geography of the region. Also, what makes the Bay Area so attractive is its natural beauty and prevalence of protected areas. Of course, you would propose paving over Golden Gate National Recreational Area and Muir Woods so a couple thousand yuppies could have easier commutes.

San Francisco has thrived and prospered because of its lack of freeways.
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