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Old September 17th, 2013, 09:49 PM   #1141
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Old September 17th, 2013, 11:35 PM   #1142
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I remember when this site used to have mods....
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Old September 18th, 2013, 01:56 AM   #1143
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It does, Just not this thread apparently...

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Old September 18th, 2013, 06:25 AM   #1144
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I'm a little permissive with off-shoot linked conversations, but let's leave at that please, finito! No mas.

Now, going back to Metro and LAX. I said this before some time back, LAX's expansion plans have been ambiguous in the last 20-25 years. This due to stiff opposition by residents of the bordering city of El Segundo.

Metro wasn't going to wait when they built the Green Line years ago, and they even left "preparations" at the Aviation Station.



MAP

LAX's Master Plan has been through many changes, they wanted a 5th landing strip and it was vetoed by the residents, and so on and so forth, so a direct connection to Metro wasn't workable at the time, plans kept on changing.

So don't think that you are shedding light on an issue that wasn't or hasn't been mauled over by LAX and Metro incessantly. It's not news to them, there was much more going on here.

The new plan for LAX is to have a central terminus for passenger drop off (Intermodal Transportation Facility) (no more driving by the terminals), this will be immediately link to Metro and the people mover that will take you to the terminals. (also with the Consolidated Car Rental Facility).




As you can see, this will also require street realignments, moving the north landing strips and extending one of them, extending the new terminals, reconfiguring some, demolishing a part of one, and adding a new Terminal 0.

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Old September 19th, 2013, 01:22 AM   #1145
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Is this still the preferred plan from LAX? is there a website with details?
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Old September 19th, 2013, 05:21 AM   #1146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starrwulfe View Post
Is this still the preferred plan from LAX? is there a website with details?
Absolutely...this is the Final Master Plan..http://ourlax.org/pub_finalMP.aspx

Looks like the final plan has the Car Rental and the Intermodal Transportation Facility switched. The renders in the site give you a very good idea of all the work that's coming up.

Looks like eventually the north terminals will be consolidated into a huge large one, and future terminals will extend westward.

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Old September 22nd, 2013, 10:37 PM   #1147
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Expo Line- Century City cluster, Los Angeles, in the background.

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Los Angeles Metro Expo Line Grand Opening by bigbend700, on Flickr

Red Line - Hollywood and Vine Station

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Los Angeles Metro Subway (Red Line) Entrance, Hollywood & Vine Station by JoeInSouthernCA, on Flickr
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Old September 24th, 2013, 08:20 AM   #1148
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Very interesting thread.
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Old November 25th, 2013, 12:18 AM   #1149
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Expo Light Rail Line Phase 2 To Santa Monica Now 50 Percent Complete

Quote:
Phase two of the Expo Light Rail Line, from Culver City to Santa Monica, is now 50 percent complete and is on-time and on-budget, according to the Expo E-News Fall 2013 newsletter.

A majority of the eight bridges along the alignment are nearing completion, including the Venice Boulevard Bridge linking Phase 1 and Phase 2 at the intersection of Venice and Robertson boulevards.

Work at the 26th Street/Bergamot and Westwood/Rancho Park stations is well underway, with station foundation and utility work in progress.

Construction of the maintenance facility in Santa Monica began this summer and will be completed next fall.

Site excavation activities are ongoing and construction of building foundations will follow in the next quarter Utility relocations are continuing throughout the alignment, with SRJV working to minimize impacts on residents, businesses, drivers, pedestrians and bicyclists

“We are proud to announce that SRJV has achieved one million hours worked on the project without a lost time incident over the past two years, keeping both the construction team and the public safe,” the newsletter reads. “We appreciate your patience throughout this major construction work.”

The next major milestone for the Expo Phase 2 project is track installation starting this fall.

More than 30 miles of rail will be installed along the alignment between Culver City and Santa Monica by SRJV’s subcontractor Herzog-Delta, a team with over 100 years combined experience in the railroading industry.

The first installations of track across intersections will take place this month at Westwood Boulevard and Overland Avenue, and will require a full weekend closure at each location.

[...]
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Old November 30th, 2013, 07:42 PM   #1150
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Los Angeles Times
http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-m...#axzz2m9SeqpuY

Quote:

Commuters swipe their TAP (Transit Access Pass) cards at the 7th Street/ Metro Center station in downtown L.A. Officials began locking the subway turnstiles in June, stopping many people from riding for free. (Al Seib, Los Angeles Times / November 26, 2013)


Ridership discrepancy calls Metro's estimation method into question

Data from turnstiles show drastic drop in riders since stations have been locked, but Metro estimates ridership has actually increased


By Jon Schleuss, Laura J. Nelson and Doug Smith

November 29, 2013, 7:30 p.m.

After officials began locking the turnstiles to the Los Angeles subway in June, stopping many passengers from riding for free, the volume of people entering the system may have fallen significantly, according to data reviewed by The Times.

From May through October, the number of people passing through turnstiles each month fell from 4.8 million to 4 million, according to the data. Over the same time frame, however, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority's ridership estimates climbed by about 400,000 passengers.

In September, the first full month that all gates were locked, about 3.7 million people were counted entering the subway — a decrease of 23% from May.

Metro officials said they cannot explain the discrepancy, and aren't sure whether ridership has fallen or not. They cautioned that the data were preliminary.

"Metro needs to find out what's going on and why, because that's just a huge number," former Metro director Richard Katz said. "You expect the number to drop by a few percent when you make a change, but nothing that big."

The gap raises questions about how Metro calculates ridership, a statistic that helps determine future federal funding, and what effect locking the subway system's gates will have on those who depend on the mass transit system.

In June, officials began locking the turnstiles, creating the system's first barrier to prevent people from riding for free. To board now, commuters must purchase an electronic card that they scan to unlock the turnstiles.

Clicks of a turnstile are automatic and mechanical, said David Sutton, who runs Metro's fare system, but they don't account for every passenger.

For example, turnstiles aren't installed between train lines at the 7th Street/Metro Center station, spokesman Marc Littman said, so people transferring are only counted once. Some passengers also skirt the gates by going through wheelchair-accessible entrances or emergency exits, he said. Others could be switching to buses, a ridership statistic that Metro measures separately.

"I ride the system every day," Littman said. "It sure doesn't look like there's a ... drop in ridership." Officials said their current estimates meet federal accuracy benchmarks: a 95% confidence interval, with a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

Two dozen Metro employees create the estimates by counting the people who board every train at every station during key times of the day, said Conan Cheung, a deputy executive officer for the transportation authority.

A complete count takes about six months, he said, so every estimate is a cumulative tally of boardings from the previous half-year. For example, October's official ridership estimate of 4.6 million comes from a rolling tally starting in May.

Cheung said the samplings are a "snapshot of a day" and typically average out seasonal variations or unusually high or low days. He added it could take a few months for the estimates to adjust for any drastic ridership changes.

The estimation method Metro uses differs from that of other U.S. subway systems, including New York City and Washington, D.C., which rely solely on turnstile counts, officials for those agencies said.

"[Metro] should start incorporating turnstile data into their ridership estimate for their lines that have near 100% latched turnstiles," said Juan Matute, the associate director at the UCLA Institute of Transportation Studies.

He added that he'd like to see the turnstile and fare-entry data available on Metro's website, "so that researchers and even app developers could use that data in ways we've never thought of before."

In June, the Los Angeles subway recorded 700,000 more turnstile counts than estimated riders, according to the data obtained by The Times through a public records request. By October, the data points had reversed, showing 600,000 more riders than turns of the metal barriers.

Experts said that could indicate that before the subway turnstiles were locked, more customers were riding for free than the agency realized. Metro officials said they don't know the current fare evasion rate, but that it was 5% to 6% before the turnstiles were locked. A standard subway ticket costs $1.50, and transfers are not free.

Metro officials said they don't believe the dip in turnstile counts is purely a result of fare evaders who've stopped riding. Cheung said about 80% of passengers buy a seven-day or monthly pass, which allows for unlimited trips. "To have 23% fare evasion goes against that … relationship," Cheung said.

Metro officials said they hoped to incorporate turnstile counts — and possibly electronic ticket data — into their federal ridership estimates once the numbers are validated.

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Old December 8th, 2013, 03:46 AM   #1153
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East Los Angeles by efipdx, on Flickr

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Los Angeles by Donte Tidwell, on Flickr

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City of Dreams, River of History by sirgious, on Flickr

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105 Metro Station by dugm2, on Flickr

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Hollywood & Vine Station by Angie安姬, on Flickr
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Old December 16th, 2013, 08:18 AM   #1154
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Los Angeles Times
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...#axzz2nGzydHAT

Quote:
Metro locks more Blue Line station gates to fight fare evaders

By Ari Bloomekatz

December 12, 2013, 7:00 a.m.

Metro Blue Line riders will encounter more locked gates Thursday as the transit agency continues to clamp down on fare skippers. The stations with newly latched gates include Slauson, Firestone, Compton, Artesia and Del Amo.

In its efforts to eventually make all of those riding Metro trains actually pay their fare, transportation officials this week announced the next step in latching gates at stations around the transit system.

When officials latch the gates, it means passengers need to use a TAP card with the correct fare to pass through turnstiles.

Next Wednesday, officials plan to start locking the gates at 14 stations on the Green Line.

Latching gates at Union Station on the Red and Purple lines started June 19 and was completed in August. Five Gold Line stations were latched in October, according to a post on Metro's blog, the Source.

When completed, 41 of 80 Metro rail stations will be latched to "provide fuller integration in the TAP universal fare system," the post says.

Even while officials move along with their plan to keep latching gates, there are many stations too small to gate. At those stations, the honor system will still be in place.

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Old December 23rd, 2013, 10:37 PM   #1155
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Metro's under construction map:


Expo Phase II and Gold Line Phase II are more than half completed; Crenshaw Line and Purple Line to La Cienega are in pre-construction. Putting the Purple Line to the VA may be a little disingenuous here, as it is not close to construction, but hopefully will raise awareness for a Measure R/J successor that would accelerate the timeframe, likely in 2016.
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Old December 23rd, 2013, 11:01 PM   #1156
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Good to see such progress; using a public transportation in LA was a suffering experience for me.
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Old December 24th, 2013, 01:00 AM   #1157
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http://www.theatlanticcities.com/com...-driving/7936/

Quote:
Definitive Evidence That L.A.'s New Light Rail Line Reduces Driving



Los Angeles, in case you haven't heard, is doing everything in its power to shed its reputation as a car-first (or, in some minds, car-only) city. Part of that effort involves a massive expansion to the city's rail system — with six new lines slated to open between 2012 and 2020. One of these, the Expo light rail line, which runs more than 8 miles west of downtown Los Angeles toward Culver City, opened in June 2012 and is now carrying nearly 28,000 people each weekday.

The success of L.A.'s rail program will take years to determine, but an early analysis released this week suggests it's on the right track (so to speak). A research team led by Marlon Boarnet of the University of Southern California reports that the Expo Line led to significant changes in travel behavior — mostly in the desired direction. Boarnet and company found major reductions in driving and greenhouse gas emissions, as well as increases in rail ridership and physical activity.

L.A.'s transit expansion will be assessed many ways, many times, over many years.

The researchers followed about a hundred people who lived within a half mile of a new Expo Line station, and about a hundred more who lived in a comparable neighborhood nearby. In the fall of 2011, before the line began service, these test participants tracked their travel behavior for a week (logging trips, recording car odometer readings, and carrying a GPS device capable of measuring both location and physical activity). In the fall 2012, when Expo service began, the families did the same thing for another week.

The changes in driving behavior were most striking. Before Expo service began, the household travel patterns between the two types of groups looked similar. Afterward, the non-Expo group showed no statistical change in their daily vehicle-miles traveled (in fact, it increased slightly), while the Expo group reduced their daily miles driven significantly.

Overall, people near the Expo stations reduced vehicle-miles by 10 to 12 miles a day relative to those in other neighborhoods — a 40 percent drop in driving. This impact was greatest near rail stations surrounded by more bus lines and near stations on streets with fewer traffic lanes. In other words, a strong bus network and a limited road network likely enhanced transit behavior.

The researchers spotted other significant changes, too. Train trips increased among those living near the stations (as one would expect), and these households produced 30 percent fewer emissions, compared to the other households. The least active people living along the Expo line also engaged in about 8 to 10 minutes more of physical activity each day — presumably as a result of increased transit use.

What makes this study so important is its method. Most research on the impact of light rail considers broad travel patterns across wide geographical areas over many years and infers whether the rail line itself had a role in any changes. Recent work taking that approach has been mixed: there's evidence that Denver's light rail lines have made traffic better than it would have been, and little sign that light rail lines in Great Britain have produced much of a shift.

The current research on the Expo Line is, in the words of its authors, the "first-ever experimental-control group, before-after study of the impact of a major transportation investment in California" [PDF]. In simpler terms, this means the researchers tracked precise changes in actual individual travel behavior. That method gives them enough confidence to conclude that the Expo Line itself was the cause of these changes.

It's worth repeating that L.A.'s transit expansion will be assessed many ways, many times, over many years. A shift in travel behavior away from cars is only one metric (equally important is an analysis of whether the benefits were worth the massive financial investment), but it's an extremely encouraging one. Boarnet told Laura J. Nelson of the Los Angeles Times that it's still "very tough for people to wrap their minds around" the fact that the city has made a rail transit push. Findings like this make it a lot easier.
Keywords: Los Angeles, Great Britain, Light Rail, Expo Line, Marlon Boarnet, rail transit, University of Southern California, Denver, Los Angeles, Metro
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Old January 9th, 2014, 08:49 AM   #1158
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Los Angeles announced Blue Line upgrade:

Quote:
http://thesource.metro.net/2014/01/0...lion-overhaul/

Metro Blue Line receiving a $1.2-billion overhaul
January 8, 2014 by Steve Hymon

A media event was held this morning along the Blue Line. Click here for a brief video of the event and check out the above time-lapse of a Blue Line car being refurbished.

Metro will soon be issuing a contract for work at Blue Line stations while other work is ongoing. In addition to some of the upgrades mentioned in the news release below — new and upgraded rail cars and both track and power system improvements — there are also some other fixes including more pedestrian swing gates and warning signage, replacement of the train control system and four new crossovers to improve train movements when the Blue Line is reduced to one track.

There is also a new web page for the project.

Here is the news release from Metro:

The Metro Blue Line, Los Angeles County’s oldest light rail line and one of the busiest light rail lines in the United States, is undergoing a $1.2-billion overhaul replacing power stations, overhead power lines, tracks, rail cars and improvements to station platforms in a multiyear investment to bolster reliability, comfort and safety.

Some of the work on the Blue Line, which has linked Los Angeles and Long Beach and all the communities in between for 23 years, has already begun while other upgrades and improvements will be completed over the next six years.

“Even as we move forward on new transit projects, we are committed to maintaining the world-class transportation system we’ve already built,” said Metro Board Chair Diane DuBois. “The Metro Board commits to our customers and taxpayers a long term investment to keep the Blue Line in top form.”

“In the past seven years we have spent $260 million improving grade crossings, replacing street lights and upgrading vehicle lights to improve safety,” said Metro CEO Art Leahy. “We are in the midst of painting and replacing worn parts and fixtures at Blue Line stations. Next, patrons will see brand new trains and some refurbished rail cars,” Leahy said.

Nearly $739 million is earmarked to purchase 78 new light rail vehicles plus $130 million to repair and upgrade 52 light rail cars now in service.

“The Blue Line is an old train that’s long overdue for an upgrade,” said Metro Board Vice Chair and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. ”This investment will make life better for the 90,000 people who ride the Blue Line every day with a safer, more convenient, and more comfortable commute.”

To improve reliability and performance, $82 million is being invested to replace all 20 traction power substations with 19 already completed. Overhead power lines (Overhead Catenary System) in downtown Los Angeles and Long Beach are being upgraded at a cost of nearly $13 million. Another $13 million is being spent to replace rail track in Long Beach that was degraded by moist sea air with completion expected in 2019.

The Metro Blue Line has 22 stations between downtown Long Beach and the 7th Street/Metro Center in downtown Los Angeles where it connects with the Red/Purple subway lines and the Expo Line. The Metro Blue Line services Los Angeles Trade Technical College, the famed Watts Towers and connects to the Metro Green Line at the Willowbrook station for service to Norwalk and Redondo Beach.

“The Blue line is the backbone of transportation for the central part of Los Angeles County and this investment means that working families can continue to count on this system for decades to come,” said Metro Board Director and Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe.

During the six years of the Metro Blue Line overhaul project there will be periodic service interruptions. Work is planned for weekends, off-peak and overnight hours to minimize the impact on commuters, who account for most of the nearly 90,000 daily boardings. When necessary, bus shuttles will be used to bridge gaps in rail service.

“The Metro Blue Line proved to Southern California that public transit is clean, economical and convenient for everyone,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, a Metro board member. “At any time, you can step on a train and see workers in boots carrying lunch pails, students with book bags slung over their shoulders and business people in suits holding briefcases.”

The Metro Blue Line first began operation on July 14, 1990 as a partnership between the Southern California Rapid Transit District and the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission with rosy predictions of 5,000 riders per day. Within two weeks, at least 600,000 people had ridden the Blue Line.

The Metro Rail system has about 360,000 average weekday boardings with 88 miles of track consisting of the Blue Line, the Red/Purple Lines subway connecting downtown Los Angeles and North Hollywood, the Gold Line connecting Pasadena with East Los Angeles, the Green Line and the Expo Line traveling between Culver City and downtown.

“Without the bold experiment that was the Blue Line we would not have the growing network of light rail and subway lines that we have today,” said Los Angeles County Supervisor and Metro Board member Zev Yaroslavsky. “This year, construction begins on the Crenshaw/LAX light rail line and preparation work continues on the Purple Line subway that will extend all the way from downtown to UCLA. Construction continues on Phase 2 of the Expo Line completion to Santa Monica and on the Gold Line extension to Azusa.”

Commuters can stay informed on all Metro Blue Line updates by checking at metro.net/bluelineupgrades where photographs, construction notices and timeline updates will be posted.
And below two videos from Metro. First is from press conference:



Second is timelapse of refurbishing train:

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Old January 9th, 2014, 09:42 PM   #1159
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Old January 15th, 2014, 12:24 AM   #1160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeFe View Post
Kenni wrote


No, not good enough, Los Angeles must be the largest city in the western world that does not have a direct rail connection to the city centre. People who arrive at airports do not have cars, even other Americans must find this a bit inadequate!
No, it's not. New York City doesn't have a direct connection, either. Only two of NYC's three major airports even have an indirect rail connection, and in both cases you have to take a peoplemover system to reach the actual regional subway and/or commuter rail systems. Neither do Toronto or Montreal. The largest major US city with full one-seat ride rail service to the airports is actually Chicago.
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