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Old February 18th, 2014, 06:53 AM   #1181
redspork02
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http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...ete-milestone/

The 11.5-mile Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension is now 50 percent complete, according to the Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority.

Pictures

http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...ete-milestone/

Also milestone were reached when the first of 18 new power traction substations was delivered to the Gold Line Foothill Extension and the Expo Line projects.


http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...livered-today/
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Old February 18th, 2014, 06:39 PM   #1182
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But why the line has level crossings? Instead of a fast LRT it will be slow tram.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 08:16 PM   #1183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
But why the line has level crossings? Instead of a fast LRT it will be slow tram.
Well LRT is a tram, the is no actual difference.

Considering fully-grade separated tram (LRT) vs separated tram (LRT) with level crossings: the first option have better throughput, but cost noticeably more, the second have lower throughput, and lower cost as well. Which option is better - is very dependent on local circumstances, and should be decided separately for each case.
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Old February 18th, 2014, 08:48 PM   #1184
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Los Angeles looks like a city ripe for monorails
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Old February 19th, 2014, 05:46 AM   #1185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redspork02 View Post
http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...ete-milestone/

The 11.5-mile Metro Gold Line Foothill Extension is now 50 percent complete, according to the Gold Line Foothill Extension Construction Authority.

Pictures

http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...ete-milestone/

Also milestone were reached when the first of 18 new power traction substations was delivered to the Gold Line Foothill Extension and the Expo Line projects.


http://thesource.metro.net/2014/02/1...livered-today/
This is awesome. Any idea how long it would take to get from Asuza to downtown Los Angeles? I hope this extension will get many more cars off the road.
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Old February 20th, 2014, 08:56 PM   #1186
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Remarks about Regional Connector:

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Old February 21st, 2014, 03:40 AM   #1187
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
This is awesome. Any idea how long it would take to get from Asuza to downtown Los Angeles? I hope this extension will get many more cars off the road.
The EIR provided a figure of 17 or 18 minutes. So, add 29 minutes for Union Station to Sierra Madre Villa and you arrive at 46 or 47 minutes.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 12:57 PM   #1188
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http://www.sbsun.com/technology/2014...town-connector

Metrolink gets collision-avoidance technology, Metro gets downtown connector
By Dakota Smith, Los Angeles Daily News

Nearly six years after a Metrolink passenger train barreled head-on into a freight train in Chatsworth after its operator ran a red light, new technology that would have prevented the deadly collision is being installed throughout the system.

Metrolink rolled out a train Thursday morning equipped with “positive train control,” which lets on-board computers halt engines remotely if trains speed or blow through stop signals. Within about a year, Metrolink will cover its entire 512 miles of track, a spokesman said.

Metrolink becomes the first commuter train system in the nation to install the $210 million technology, making the network the “safest commuter train in America,” said Patrick Morris, San Bernardino mayor and chairman of the Metrolink Board of Directors.

Among others, Morris was joined on the inaugural ride by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who authored the legislation requiring that all commercial and passenger trains install the new technology by December 2015.

Twenty-five people died and more than 130 were injured when a westbound Metrolink train carrying afternoon commuters collided with a Union Pacific freight train. A national transportation report concluded the engineer was sending texts around the time of the accident.

Recalling the “ambitious students, loving parents and accomplished community builders” who died in the September 2008 accident, Feinstein noted “no one would have been lost” if smart technology was in place.

“The Chatsworth crash was entirely preventable,” she said. “It occurred because one individual failed to heed red signals.”

Metrolink runs lines in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego and Ventura counties and carries about 42,000 riders a day.

Juan Magdaleno, whose sister Aida, a 19-year-old Cal State Northridge student, died in the Chatsworth crash, expressed mixed emotions about Thursday’s announcement. Since the crash, the Simi Valley resident has forbid his 10-year-old son from riding Metrolink, he said, because there hasn’t been technology in place to prevent another crash.

“For us, we believed the systems were in place and we were safe, and we were wrong,” said Magdaleno, 39. “I’m happy that they’re making change, but I had to lose my sister.”

The National Transportation Safety Board, an independent agency that oversees rail incidents, has pushed for the technology since the 1990s, but Chatsworth refocused attention on the technology.

Feinstein’s Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008 mandates that all commuter and freight rail companies install the anti-collision technology. Some trade groups representing the rail and bus industry have unsuccessfully fought the 2015 deadline, citing the cost and complexity of such a system.

Supporters, however, point to the lives that could be saved. The November 2013 derailment of a Metro North train outside of New York City, which killed four people, could have been avoided if this technology was in place, transportation officials said Thursday.

Metrolink’s agencies will pay for about half of the $216 million price tag, with the federal government and state of California shelling out for the remainder.

Earlier in the day, Feinstein, joined by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and a host of local transportation officials, celebrated another major milestone in Southern California transit with the announcement of $670 million in federal money to fund the Los Angeles regional connector.

Spearheaded by the L.A. County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the $1.4 billion project will link three existing lines with a tunnel and three stations. Right now, riders can’t travel in from one side of downtown and out the other on light-rail lines without exiting and transferring twice — and paying two extra fares.

The link is expected to save some commuters up to 20 minutes, transit officials said.

With the federal money secured, major construction is expected to begin later this year and finish around 2020.

The remainder of the project will be paid for by a mix of state bonds and sales tax revenue from Measure R, the half-percent tax passed by voters in 2008.

In celebrating the regional connector’s funding, Garcetti said Los Angeles’ subway and light-rail lines don’t move passengers far enough. For instance, the Red Line, which runs from downtown to Hollywood to the San Fernando Valley, doesn’t pass by the Hollywood Bowl, Garcetti said.

“Los Angeles is replete with half-finished projects,” said Garcetti, according to video of the event.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 01:26 PM   #1189
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This is the "Downtown Regional Connector"

A light-rail tunnel.




Los Angeles is a World-Class city that should be building more segregated rail (subway or elevated or surface) instead of resorting to half-measures like light-rail.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 03:31 PM   #1190
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Full video:

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Old February 21st, 2014, 03:54 PM   #1191
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From Railway Gazette:

Quote:
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/i...operation.html

Metrolink PTC goes into operation
21 Feb 2014


Metrolink's PTC-equipped locomotives are clearly identified


PTC training can be undertaken in this simulator of a Hyundai Rotem cab car


The PTC demonstration train at Los Angeles Union Station

USA: Southern California Regional Rail Authority became the first US commuter rail operator to begin using Positive Train Control in revenue service on February 17. Metrolink has started operating with PTC on selected trains using the BNSF tracks between Los Angeles and Riverside.

On February 20, Metrolink demonstrated the technology to invited guests, including California’s US Senator Dianne Feinstein, with a trip on train 686 between Los Angeles Union Station and Fullerton. ‘I have spent my entire life around the rail, but this is unequivocally the most instrumental piece of technology ever implemented for train safety’, said Metrolink Board Chair Pat Morris.

The Federal Railroad Administration has authorised the agency to operate on BNSF territory using Wabtec's Interoperable Electronic Train Management System, enabling Metrolink to begin using the equipment on those trains which already have been fitted. SCRRA officials confirmed that PTC will be fully implemented across the 825 km network 2015.

The estimated cost for developing, installing, and deploying PTC is put at $216m. The programme includes the construction of a new dispatching centre and the introduction of a PTC ‘back-office’ to replace Metrolink’s current computer-aided dispatching system. Onboard equipment is being installed on 52 locomotives and 57 driving cars, and lineside equipment at 476 signals; these are supported by a communications network which spreads across six counties in southern California.

The catalyst for congressional legislation mandating deployment of PTC on all passenger routes in the USA was the head-on collision between a Metrolink commuter train and a Union Pacific freight train on September 12, 2008, just north of the station at Chatsworth, which killed 25 people. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the collision was the result of the Metrolink train passing a red signal.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 05:55 PM   #1192
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
...
Los Angeles is a World-Class city that should be building more segregated rail (subway or elevated or surface) instead of resorting to half-measures like light-rail.
They are building what they can afford.

If Los Angeles had started building a rail transit system when San Francisco had started building BART, perhaps there would be heavy rail where they are presently building light rail.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 06:23 PM   #1193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz View Post
But why the line has level crossings? Instead of a fast LRT it will be slow tram.
Well, it all depends on the following:

- Cost
- Speed
- Estimated ridership
- Potential transit connections
- Walking distances

For a city like Los Angeles, its mumble-jumble mix of so many formats, from grid to triangular to winding roads, make light rail and rapid transit alignments pretty interesting... Metro bus lines tend to employ a straight shot route on as few roads as possible (especially for its Rapid services) to ensure line consistency and frequent service over time. With light rail and rapid transit, however, you will also need to consider station spacing, how much impact a station will bring to the neighborhood, etc... you will need to factor in walkability, density, accessibility, etc on designing a proper light rail line, and it seems that LA is doing a great job in making it happen. Hopefully, the light rail will spur better services for its feeder bus lines to really improve Los Angeles' image from a freeway city to a transit-friendly megacity.

With surface stops, however, you're right: you risk running through several delays, especially railway crossing delays... however, I sense that those tracks are nearly exclusive to light rail trains, so the concern of long railway crossing arms down may not be foreseen (unless an accident occurs). But it's way cheaper than building new viaducts or digging below ground... a good chunk of LA is relatively flat, making surface light rail a great option.
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Old February 21st, 2014, 11:52 PM   #1194
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What is the combined daily ridership of all rail systems in Los Angeles?
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 12:01 AM   #1195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
They are building what they can afford.
Los Angeles is rich, they could afford to build subways.

Interestingly enough, they started on the right track with the Red line (heavy full subway) and then downgraded plans with light rail that runs on the median of avenues with traffic lights and what not.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 02:11 AM   #1196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mopc View Post
What is the combined daily ridership of all rail systems in Los Angeles?
Ridership statistics can be found here:

http://www.metro.net/news/ridership-statistics/

The light rail Blue Line between downtown Los Angeles and downtown Long Beach averages a bit over 80,000 passenger boardings per weekday and is considered near capacity. The length of the trains is limited by the distance between cross streets at some of the at-grade stations. The frequency of the trains is limited by the disruption to traffic on cross streets. The Blue Line route would have been a good candidate for heavy rail. The Expo Line is likely to experience similar capacity issues once it is completed to Santa Monica.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 02:13 PM   #1197
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Los Angeles is rich, they could afford to build subways.

Interestingly enough, they started on the right track with the Red line (heavy full subway) and then downgraded plans with light rail that runs on the median of avenues with traffic lights and what not.
Well, you are missing the fact, that in such a huge city the primary task is to create huge network, so the people would actually use it.
Late USSR (late 80s-early 90s) have several example of building one perfect subway line in middle of nowhere (in terms of network effect)... And all those failed spectacularly in financial terms, as well in terms of ridership.

I suppose, that in a so much auto-oriented city, with all that tea-parting around, creating a vast network with guaranteed ridership just politically more feasible, than a small network with low ridership.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 03:24 PM   #1198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XAN_ View Post
Late USSR (late 80s-early 90s) have several example of building one perfect subway line in middle of nowhere (in terms of network effect)... And all those failed spectacularly in financial terms, as well in terms of ridership.
Which cities do you mean?
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 03:50 PM   #1199
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Quote:
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Which cities do you mean?
Samara, Dnepropetrovsk, Erevan are most prominent examples.
The last are really disastrous - it was initially planned as rapid tram (LRT) with underground section, but local authorities wanted to have a real subway just as expensive toy, and somehow managed to push the decision through Union authorities The result - expensive system with daily ridership of 40 000.

Also, cities of Omsk and Chelyabisk are also caught in this trap -they are pouring money for constructing 4 station, 7.5 km and 4 station, 5.7 km respectively. Such a short system won't really matter for most people living in this city (they either live or work outside it's coverage), but it would be expensive to operate. Such money could be utilised for upgrading tram systems to modern standards (30 km and 68 km respectively), and even building some new lines, so big share of population would be inside system coverage creating fare ridership, but in Russia there is never teaparting when it comes to subways and roads, unlike in USA.
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Old February 22nd, 2014, 05:48 PM   #1200
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Los Angeles is vastly bigger and richer than any of those midsize cities. St Petersburg (or even Moscow) would be a more proper counterpart for LA in Russia. On would think that a heavy metro (5-7 lines minimum) would be a more suitable solution for your city.
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