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Old December 27th, 2011, 08:41 PM   #6461
Mr_Dru
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agnette
Chris can You explain this sign? What does it mean?:
It warns you that the police has (hidden) cameras here on this track to control the speed limits.
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Old December 27th, 2011, 08:48 PM   #6462
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It's more a motto sign than anything else. As far as I know there are no fixed speed cameras along that section of A12. The nearby town of Driebergen is the headquarters of the highway police. They can almost do speed checks from their office.
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Old December 27th, 2011, 08:51 PM   #6463
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/\ Does it mean that cameras mounted in the police cars?
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Old December 27th, 2011, 08:55 PM   #6464
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No, they usually stand on the side of the road behind some bush... But there are some cars with cams in The Netherlands (used for tv programs as Blik op de Weg (Eye on the road) and Wegmisbruikers (Road abusers))

Example:


[IMG]http://t2.************/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTiM9hqAEsKxlppI8AyI4b8-F0UpMaSvPaSA8rBV39MU5aIpLlAnQ1Vrt4q[/IMG]
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Old December 28th, 2011, 02:01 AM   #6465
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Wegmisbruikers:

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Old December 28th, 2011, 02:37 AM   #6466
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Old episode of blik op de weg (1996):


Recent episode, from when a part f the Twente stadium collapsed:
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Old December 28th, 2011, 02:47 AM   #6467
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Provida is also very usual in Germany and Denmark, but not only for TV-Shows.
Fix Speedcams were in France announced until this year.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 02:53 AM   #6468
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My newest video. Finally a new one. Thanks to my new computer I can finally upload videos again. The old computer took way to much time uploading vids (could go up to 5 hrs for a 4-minute-video). Sadly I did lose a lot of my old videos which were on my old computer (which crashed because my cat spilled water over it, and sadly that's not a joke.... ), and I lost all those vids, Luckily I had a lot of them on my camera. This computer is way faster. More videos will follow later

This time we're driving over the downgraded N289 through Hoogerheide. A new bypass was opened 2 years ago so the old route could be downgraded. Here's the result

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Old December 28th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #6469
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agnette View Post
Chris can You explain this sign? What does it mean?:

It is surprising to me why they use English on the signboard above the road instead of proper Dutch.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 11:08 AM   #6470
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Because there are more drivers on the road than Dutch speaking people, and 24 h is a pretty common notation.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 12:18 PM   #6471
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If you hold to this reasoning, then it would be better to put the texts in German on the signs. The majority of the users of the roads are Germanic (group).
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Old December 28th, 2011, 12:23 PM   #6472
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24/7 would be even better, but 24h is universally understood. 24 stunden is not.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 12:28 PM   #6473
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
24/7 would be even better, but 24h is universally understood. 24 stunden is not.
Don't tell me that no one would understand '24u geopend/24 uur open/etc..'.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 12:41 PM   #6474
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The symbol "h" (non-SI time unit) means the same as 3600s (SI). "h" is an internationally adopted symbol, also by The Netherlands. "h" is also approved by the Bureau international des poids et mesures in France to be used togheter with SI-measurements. The Dutch law "IJkwet" made those SI-standards in the Netherlands mandatory in 1978. So yes, 24h is proper Dutch.

And for signage there's a rule: the less on the sign, the better.
Don't tell me that no one would understand "open 24h" as for being open every hour of the day.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 01:32 PM   #6475
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Also important to remark to the non-Dutch speakers: "open" means the same thing in Dutch as it does in English. So it's not looked at as a foreign language in the Netherlands
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Old December 28th, 2011, 01:48 PM   #6476
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In Poland and Czech Republic they say: Open Nonstop.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 01:55 PM   #6477
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aswnl View Post
The symbol "h" (non-SI time unit) means the same as 3600s (SI). "h" is an internationally adopted symbol, also by The Netherlands. "h" is also approved by the Bureau international des poids et mesures in France to be used togheter with SI-measurements. The Dutch law "IJkwet" made those SI-standards in the Netherlands mandatory in 1978. So yes, 24h is proper Dutch.

And for signage there's a rule: the less on the sign, the better.
Don't tell me that no one would understand "open 24h" as for being open every hour of the day.
I wasn't aware of that, thanks for the info.
My point was that the Dutch text could be as easily understood as the English one. 24h isn't proper dutch, it is an accepted Loanword. 24u or 24 uur is proper Dutch.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 02:36 PM   #6478
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24h is clearely understood everywhere in the world, 0-24 and 24/7 too, as well km for kilometers, WC for toilet,... signs should be clear for everywere not like the Italians "tutte le direzioni", "eccetto residenti e autorizzati", "zona a traffico limitato" and many others.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old December 28th, 2011, 04:47 PM   #6479
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There is also lingering resistance to replacing English-language text-based warning and other related signage with symbol signs here in the USA. For example, the USA's Federal Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) still does not adopt symbols for such warnings as 'WATCH FOR STOPPED/CONGESTED TRAFFIC', 'STRONG CROSSWINDS', 'NO OUTLET', etc.

The USA only adopted the three-arrow 'roundabout' symbol within the past 5-10 years, too.

Mike
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Old December 28th, 2011, 06:42 PM   #6480
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920
There is also lingering resistance to replacing English-language text-based warning and other related signage with symbol signs here in the USA. For example, the USA's Federal Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) still does not adopt symbols for such warnings as 'WATCH FOR STOPPED/CONGESTED TRAFFIC', 'STRONG CROSSWINDS', 'NO OUTLET', etc.

The USA only adopted the three-arrow 'roundabout' symbol within the past 5-10 years, too.

Mike
American situation is very different from the European one. In the old continent we speak several different language within few hundreds of km. Everything should be written in both local language and English but using symbols is even better.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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