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Old December 31st, 2011, 06:38 PM   #6501
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
The Americans tend to use an expression "24 hours" rather frequently instead of "one day". That is why I do not believe the expression 0-24 would be a complete disaster to be understood.

Anyway, using symbols instead of text is rather obvious in Europe because of dozens of languages belonging to several language families. For example, the following signs would be somewhat challenging to foreigners:

Well, I suppose "open 0-24" would be obvious if you thought about it for a second. "0-24" out of context wouldnt be, but everyone understands "24/7."
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Old December 31st, 2011, 06:42 PM   #6502
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GROBIN View Post
There are some exceptions within Europe. I'm wondering what Penn's Woods may think about it.

In France, for instance, these 2 irritating signs:


....
I'm nearly fluent in French, so personally, pas de problème avec those signs. (I went to Montreal with my parents once, and they insisted I do all the driving in Quebec. "We're not going to drive in a foreign country," Mom said. Which is bizarre, since they'd done plenty of driving in Europe....)

I just store that sort of thing up as examples for when Europeans insist they don't use text for anything essential. :-D
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Old January 1st, 2012, 01:28 AM   #6503
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
Well, I suppose "open 0-24" would be obvious if you thought about it for a second. "0-24" out of context wouldnt be, but everyone understands "24/7."
But 24/7 is not the same thing as 0-24. The latter often means Monday to Friday. 24/7 equals to "always", which is the default, hence usually not shown in the signs.
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Old January 1st, 2012, 02:48 AM   #6504
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Um, okay. Never would have occurred to me. Which I think illustrates the weakness of relying on this sort of thing.
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Old January 1st, 2012, 04:05 PM   #6505
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Congestion down one quarter in 2011

The Traffic Information Center (VID) reports traffic congestion was down 24.1% in 2011, reaching the level of around the year 2000, a reduction never seen before, which can be almost completely attributed to additional highway capacity. 7 out of the 10 worst spots from 2010 dropped in congestion, good for 16 out of the 24% reduction. The traffic jam top 50 has never seen such a change as last year. 22 new locations went into the top 50, as many old spots dropped out. The two worst congestion spots are those where road widening works are currently in progress on A4 and A50.


statistics by VID: http://www.vid.nl/top50.html
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Old January 1st, 2012, 05:13 PM   #6506
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Good argument for Dutch drivers wanting default (& not just short test zones) 130 km/h limit instead of 120.
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"Richtgeschwindigkeit" should be the default system in all EU motorways & expressways & lane indiscipline should be harshly fought! Down with radars on motorways!
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Old January 1st, 2012, 10:31 PM   #6507
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GROBIN View Post


Good argument for Dutch drivers wanting default (& not just short test zones) 130 km/h limit instead of 120.
This decrease of traffic congestion has nothing to do with speed limits, the addition of highway capacity is the main reason of less congestion last year.
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Old January 1st, 2012, 10:50 PM   #6508
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I know that ! I understood ChrisZwolle's post ! But I meant what I wrote above as a consequence of the congestion decrease.

P.S.: I'm surprised you guys still want to use your cars with what ChrisZwolle wrote on the Italian autostrade and superstrade section about your road taxes !
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"Richtgeschwindigkeit" should be the default system in all EU motorways & expressways & lane indiscipline should be harshly fought! Down with radars on motorways!
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Old January 2nd, 2012, 01:29 AM   #6509
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GROBIN View Post


I know that ! I understood ChrisZwolle's post ! But I meant what I wrote above as a consequence of the congestion decrease.
section about your road taxes !
I'm sorry, I think I've misunderstood your reply (#6506).

Last edited by Godius; January 2nd, 2012 at 01:34 AM.
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Old January 3rd, 2012, 11:27 PM   #6510
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Quote:
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I'm sorry, I think I've misunderstood your reply (#6506).
Maybe because the way I wrote was fairly unclear
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"Richtgeschwindigkeit" should be the default system in all EU motorways & expressways & lane indiscipline should be harshly fought! Down with radars on motorways!
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Old January 4th, 2012, 11:25 AM   #6511
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Largest road investment ever greenlit

The Schiphol - Amsterdam - Almere megaproject has gotten the green light today. All 41 appeals against the record of decision were rejected by the Council of State today. This means the € 4.4 billion project can proceed. Construction is expected to begin almost immediately.

The project consists of the upgrading of the A1-A6-A9/A10 corridor between Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam and Almere, by adding signicant road capacity. Construction will begin early 2012 and be completed around 2018 - 2020. It will be phased, starting in Amsterdam and turn eastwards towards Almere, then proceeding along A9.

The A1 motorway will be widened to as much as 12 lanes, with 2x5 lanes, 2 reversible lanes and 2 bus lanes. This section is forecasted to carry 317 000 vehicles per day by 2035.

The A6 motorway will be widened from 2x3 to a 12-lane setup with 3+2+2+2+3 lanes, also with reversible lanes to Almere, and 4x2 lanes until the northeast side of Almere.

The A9 will be widened to as much as 12 lanes in Amsterdam-Zuidoost, partially within a land tunnel. This section will also get reversible lanes. Furthermore, the A9 will be widened to 2x4 lanes westwards to Badhoevedorp, also with a land tunnel in Amstelveen. Finally, the A10 will be widened to 2x4 lanes in eastern Amsterdam.

All interchanges will be rebuild. Over 100 bridges, overpasses and tunnels will be reconstructed.

The massive road project is an answer to the 2006 canceling of a 2x2 motorway between A6 and A9, southeast of Amsterdam. The result is a far more impressive motorway project, adding hundreds of additional lane kilometers.

Project extents:
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Old January 4th, 2012, 12:00 PM   #6512
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Sweet fancy Moses
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Old January 4th, 2012, 12:15 PM   #6513
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Holy crap!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The A1 motorway will be widened to as much as 12 lanes, with 2x5 lanes, 2 reversible lanes and 2 bus lanes.
I'm a bit lost here, does this mean the bus lanes are included in the 2x5 setup and then there are additional reversible lanes, ultimately creating 12 lanes?
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Old January 4th, 2012, 12:21 PM   #6514
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2 additional bus lanes. So that would mean 14 lanes total
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Old January 4th, 2012, 12:28 PM   #6515
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Ah, the other option. Thanks.
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Old January 4th, 2012, 10:43 PM   #6516
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Here's a map of the Hollandse Brug, a bridge that connects Flevoland and North Holland provinces, immediately south of Almere.

The western (top) bridge is currently in use in both directions. The eastern bridge will be a completely new one. The bridge will feature 10 motorway lanes, a two-lane local road and a double bus lanes, hence 14 lanes. Just north of the bridge (right on the image) there are 12 motorway lanes as it approaches the local-express setup around Almere.

Immediately west of the existing bridge is a two-track railway bridge, but it's not very well visible on the image. There have been talks about widening the railway to 4 tracks, probably by adding another railway bridge to the west, but this is currently not planned yet (though seen as a vision for the future).

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Old January 4th, 2012, 10:59 PM   #6517
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A map of the new Muiden aquaduct. To the left is Amsterdam, to the right Almere / Amersfoort.

The aquaduct will have 5 lanes each way, plus a two-lane reversible, enabling 7 lanes in the peak direction. And from the looks of it, it has space for 2x6 lanes (or a wider reversible). Of interesting note, the two-lane busway has been scrapped from the aquaduct compared to the initial design. Weird that I didn't notice this before.



This is the A1/A6 interchange Muiderberg. This section features up to 6 lanes each way before/after the interchange, plus a two-lane reversible. That's 14 lanes for you. The double bus lane further west has been scrapped, it was originally planned to feature it all the way west towards Amsterdam, but probably cut because it's somewhat overkill because the A1 won't be very congested anymore with this amount of capacity.



Here we have the approach to interchange Diemen, the widest section of the entire SAA project. It's just west of a new interchange and features 2 bus lanes, 2 merging lanes from the exit, 6 mainline lanes, 2 reversible lanes, another 6 mainline lanes and 2 merging lanes to the exit. That's a grand total of 20 lanes.

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Old January 5th, 2012, 09:35 PM   #6518
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A study by the Dutch transportation institute KIM found out the following things about mobility and fuel prices:


Car drivers do not drive significantly less when fuel prices at the pump rise. If fuel prices increase by approximately 12.5 percent, the long-term decrease in passenger car kilometres travelled is 2.5 percent. Higher fuel prices have also not resulted in a more fuel-efficient ‘car fleet’. The car-fleet specific fuel consumption remained relatively constant from the late 1980s to 2009.

During 2011, fuel prices at the pump surpassed the record highs set in 2008. The question arises as to what extent high fuel prices influence the number of car kilometres travelled. This study revealed that automobility, in economic terms, is an „inelastic. product. That is to say that a change in fuel price has a relatively minor effect on the number of car kilometres travelled. This study is based on data derived from the period 1980 to 2009.

Consumers usually react more strongly to luxury good price changes than they do to the price changes of necessary products. The slight price elasticity clearly reveals that for many people car use is deemed a necessary product.

Slight reduction in number of kilometres
What are the long term consequences of a sharp rise in the price of crude oil? In the first instance, if the price of a barrel of crude oil increases from $70 to $100 USD dollars, the price of gasoline will increase by approximately 12.5 percent. Based on this study's findings, the price increase over the long term (5 to 10 years) will result in a 2.5 percent reduction in the number of car kilometres travelled.

A price rise has a greater impact on the long-term than the short-term. In the short-term, car drivers will travel fewer kilometres or alter their driving style („foot off the gas pedal.). In the long-term, people can also reduce their home-to-work travel by more often working from home or by residing closer to their workplaces or purchasing more fuel-efficient cars.

Car fleet not more fuel-efficient, owing to increased power and luxury cars
This study not only examined the impact higher fuel prices have on the number of car kilometres travelled, but also the effect this has on the fuel-efficiency of the „car fleet‟. For car drivers, the specific fuel cost is dependent on the price of fuel and the specific fuel consumption. If the price of fuel increases, this does not, by definition, result in higher specific fuel costs. By driving more fuel-efficient cars, car drivers can mitigate part of the price increase.

The analysis does not point toward a more car-fleet specific fuel consumption emerging as a consequence of higher fuel prices at the pump. The trend for larger cars (increased power) and more comfort (electric windows, airconditioning) has offset improvements in fuel efficiency technology. The result is that from the late 1980s to 2009 the specific fuel consumption has remained virtually constant, recent years have seen a marked improvement in the specific fuel consumption, as measured in new-car specific CO2 emission. Additional research into the underlying factors for development of fuel-efficient passenger cars therefore also seems pertinent.

Effects less pronounced than previously indicated
The majority of the definite effects of higher fuel prices revealed in the study were less pronounced than the effects previously cited in the available literature, especially with regard to the long-term effects.

An analysis of the annual figures compiled for the period 1980 to 2009, including figures pertaining to fuel prices and costs, further indicate that economic growth and the supply of new road capacity present a satisfactory explanation for the total number of gasoline-fuelled passenger car kilometres travelled.
http://www.rijksoverheid.nl/minister...obiliteit.html




This is some interesting stuff, because previously the "electronic road pricing" concept was seen as a major factor to reduce traffic congestion. But as fuel price increases have no significant effect on the vehicle kilometers driven, why would road pricing have? It's just the same, but instead of increasing fuel cost, it's increasing taxes.
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Old January 5th, 2012, 11:53 PM   #6519
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Work related traffic will probably not effected by higher fuel prices and "electronic road pricing". But I'm sure it will reduce leisure traffic.
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Old January 6th, 2012, 08:16 PM   #6520
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
A map of the new Muiden aquaduct. To the left is Amsterdam, to the right Almere / Amersfoort.
Chris, on which website are all these documents?
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