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Old December 7th, 2016, 10:57 AM   #14061
Gereke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
N451 is a new provincial road parallel to A12, it crosses the Gouwe River via the Amalia Bridge. Traffic from Gouda can enter A12 west of the Gouwe motorway interchange, so it doesn't have to weave with traffic going to A20.
What will prevent traffic from and to Gouda using the old interchange?
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Old December 7th, 2016, 11:29 AM   #14062
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Is this only for the most westly interchange? Or also for the connection with direction Ommen?
So far only the western interchange, which is called 'kruispunt Bos'.



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What will prevent traffic from and to Gouda using the old interchange?
I don't think there will be any obstacles. However it will also serve traffic from the densely populated / industrialized N207 corridor north of Gouda. There are lots of greenhouses which create a lot of truck movements.
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Old December 7th, 2016, 12:15 PM   #14063
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A7/N7 in the city of Groningen, showing the N372 interchange. They opened a new road to Eelderwolde today (shown to the upper right)

The new road to Eelderwolde is a policy failure. They wanted to keep a limit of 6000 vehicles/day or 250 vehicles/hour. They 'scientifically' came up with the hourly limit by dividing 6000 vehicles by 24 hours = 250 vehicles an hour. Completely ignoring the fact that traffic volumes are not evenly spread throughout the day, not to mention the fact that there are rush hours in the real world.

So they concluded that the 250 vehicles/hour limit was not workable.
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Old December 7th, 2016, 12:16 PM   #14064
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Let's see how road building influence or not the election debates in 2017!
I think the toll scheme might feature quite prominently (although it's always hard to predict which topics will steal the limelight).

The last time motorway tolls were a hot topic in an election campaign, the two arguments were roughly:
1) It's great against traffic jams.
2) No it's not, let's widen the roads instead.

What's interesting is that option 2 has now effectively been tried. On a massive scale. So the debate will be different and that will be interesting to watch.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 12:40 AM   #14065
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Little self celebration: I'm officially an economist

I'd like to double thank the people of Den Haag for hosting me at their non-university during my Erasmus and for inspiring my thesis, since the main case study regards the opening of a segment of the ring road N14.

Long story short: after the Sijtwendetunnel was opened (the three tunnels of N14 through Leidschendham, Voorburg and Mariahoeve), they recorded an increase in the value of houses. It was possible to find a straight link between this phenomenon and the reduction of traffic volumes, not just in general for the neighbourhood but in fine detail, almost home by home.
I used this case to demonstrate the direct connection between traffic externalities and quality of life in urban areas.

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Old December 9th, 2016, 11:09 AM   #14066
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Good stuff, congratulations!
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Old December 9th, 2016, 11:18 AM   #14067
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The new road to Eelderwolde is a policy failure. They wanted to keep a limit of 6000 vehicles/day or 250 vehicles/hour. They 'scientifically' came up with the hourly limit by dividing 6000 vehicles by 24 hours = 250 vehicles an hour. Completely ignoring the fact that traffic volumes are not evenly spread throughout the day, not to mention the fact that there are rush hours in the real world.

So they concluded that the 250 vehicles/hour limit was not workable.
And it's a nice 'sluiproute' (english word?) as well in some cases for people who work in the south of Groningen. They didn't took that in account well enough.

It's a strange area. It's not the city of Groningen, but Tynaarlo. Nearest is the village of Eelderwolde with some 200 inhabitants whilst the new housing projects on the right of the picture have more than 2000 inhabitants already. Nothing wrong with that, but some planning is strange due to that fact.
There building industrial area as well there, but on the other side of the highway there is free space enough (and other places in and around the city of Groningen), but hey we want one as well. No matter that there is space enough in the Groningen area. To much already for that matter.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 03:39 PM   #14068
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I used this case to demonstrate the direct connection between traffic externalities and quality of life in urban areas.
When talking about traffic externalities, the discussion usually focuses on the negative externalities (noise, air quality, delays, traffic accidents, etc.) but only rarely on the positive externalities, such as greatly improved mobility and the unlocking of economic opportunities, the automotive industry, the logistics sector, construction sector, being able to live in more affordable areas, lower cost of products, etc.

How did you experience that?
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Old December 9th, 2016, 03:47 PM   #14069
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A27 Merwede Bridge update

The Merwede Bridge (A27) at Gorinchem reopend to truck traffic up to 50 tons this morning. It was closed to all traffic over 3.5 tons since 11 October due to metal fatigue. They strengthened the most critical points, so truck traffic can use it again. Further repairs will be done in the coming weeks to address the less urgent spots. The bridge carries 91,000 vehicles per day, including 18,000 trucks. It is a major north-south corridor in Central Netherlands.

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Old December 9th, 2016, 06:26 PM   #14070
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
When talking about traffic externalities, the discussion usually focuses on the negative externalities (noise, air quality, delays, traffic accidents, etc.) but only rarely on the positive externalities, such as greatly improved mobility and the unlocking of economic opportunities, the automotive industry, the logistics sector, construction sector, being able to live in more affordable areas, lower cost of products, etc.

How did you experience that?
Positive externalities are there even if a new motorway, etc. has been built 1 km apart from your house. I.e. Not In My BackYard.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 06:38 PM   #14071
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
When talking about traffic externalities, the discussion usually focuses on the negative externalities (noise, air quality, delays, traffic accidents, etc.) but only rarely on the positive externalities, such as greatly improved mobility and the unlocking of economic opportunities, the automotive industry, the logistics sector, construction sector, being able to live in more affordable areas, lower cost of products, etc.

How did you experience that?
Its easier to quantify, identify and isolate that.

Its very hard to empirically isolate the public good effect on the welfare.

What you could do is to look into some underdeveloped areas, look at the prices of the houses, employement, wages, etc, evolution in the regions where transportation infrastructure has been built and compare that with the region where it hasn't been built. You would need to control for many factors to single out the welfare effect.
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Old December 9th, 2016, 08:55 PM   #14072
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
When talking about traffic externalities, the discussion usually focuses on the negative externalities (noise, air quality, delays, traffic accidents, etc.) but only rarely on the positive externalities, such as greatly improved mobility and the unlocking of economic opportunities, the automotive industry, the logistics sector, construction sector, being able to live in more affordable areas, lower cost of products, etc.

How did you experience that?
Well, the focus of this work was explicitly on negative externalities, so there was no deep research on other effects (I concentrated on: space occupied, public resources spent, accidents, air pollution and noise).

There's an open debate on what should be considered a positive externality of road traffic.
In strict terms, most of the effects you listed don't fall into the definition of externality (side effects of a choice which end up on external subjects); they provide actual benefits, but to the subject who chooses to or not to move using a car.
Wider access to better housing and jobs is an advantage to the choosing subject, so it's not an externality.

Today there's an academic tendency to not consider as externalities those industry benefits which derive from direct costs sustained by the choosing subject. So yes, the automotive and building industries get a benefit from car mobility, but their revenues are already accounted in the trade-off "Using vs. not using the car"; and so are taxes and any other expense directly linked to usage.
(although it's simplified here, we know that the infrastructure bill is often not paid directly by the users)

This is not a dogma, there are different views. I tend to apply a strict definition of externality and this excludes almost any positive externality; while the negative ones are much easier to identify because the third parties who suffer them are clearly not involved in the trade-off at any level.

To make it extremely simple, imagine a guy who in any way can't own or ride in a car and who cant' use services which use motor vehicles (like deliveries or any other business moving by car or truck), and look for the benefits he'll personally get from the rest of society using cars: only those benefits are, strictly speaking, positive externalities.
In these strict terms, there are none. Basically, every movement of every single motor vehicle is done for the benefit of a single individual, at the expense of the others.

But of course we're talking about a virtual situation, since everyone makes a direct or indirect use of a motor vehicle today.
Personally, I'd put among the positive externalities the boost the economic system gets from the sum of all the individual benefits.
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Old December 10th, 2016, 12:01 PM   #14073
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(although it's simplified here, we know that the infrastructure bill is often not paid directly by the users)
Infrastructure funding originally started through user fees, some introduced over a century ago.

In 1909, a vehicle purchase tax was introduced. In 1926, an annual road tax was introduced. At that time, it was 6 guilders per 100 kg of weight for a passenger car, (with a minimum of at least 48 guilders per year). In 1931, a fuel tax was introduced.

However, these evolved into general taxes, and not special purpose taxes. These taxes still exist today, and their revenue exceeds road expenditures by a considerable margin.
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Old December 10th, 2016, 04:32 PM   #14074
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An overhead gantry collapsed onto A9 in Amsterdam. It hit a car. The cause is unclear as of this moment. Some say it was hit by a vehicle, others say it fell from a crane. It may have been hit by a crane as they typically don't move overhead gantries with live traffic underneath it.

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Old December 10th, 2016, 05:59 PM   #14075
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Serious damages to the car, how are the occupants?


Weird (but not so strange) that the original taxes are exactly those I support today: a purchase and/or annual tax based on weight and a fuel tax.

The first for reasons of road wear and public safety, the second to improve the efficency of engines and driving choices.


One interesting point I found during my research is about pigouvian taxes, the kind of tax designed to make users pay for the negative externalities produced.
The theory is that any damage done can be given a price, and that price has to be paid by the user in order to compensate society.

The problem of pigouvian taxes is that they are a virtual artifice: they wish to incentive less damaging behaviours by hitting the choosing subject, but in practice the subject doesn't always have a free choice.
In theory the tax will push more people to pollute less; in practice you end up with a bunch of cash and a tumor, which isn't exactly an "equilibrium"...

This is to say that taxes are a very easy way to milk drivers, but real change comes from completely different policies.
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I've sold monorails to Brockway, Ogdenville, and North Haverbrooke, and by gum, it put them on the map!
Well, sir, there's nothing on earth like a genuine, bona fide, electrified, six-car monorail!

Marchionne means never having to say you're sorry.

Due to Photobucket f*cking up, most images won't be visibile in my old posts. If you need anything specific, please write me.
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Old December 10th, 2016, 06:26 PM   #14076
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One dead, one critically injured
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Old December 10th, 2016, 08:00 PM   #14077
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1 dead, 1 critically injured
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Old December 10th, 2016, 08:29 PM   #14078
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Echo...

It looks like it was the old 'dump truck with raised bed hits sign' problem.

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Old December 11th, 2016, 03:57 PM   #14079
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A50 Tacitus Bridge

The renovation works of the old Ewijk Waal River Bridge of A50 near Nijmegen are now finally approaching completion.

The bridge, which opened in 1976, underwent a thorough renovation and strengthening process. One of the works was a replacement of the cables, which is a unique process that allegedly has never been done before in Europe. It resulted in a lawsuit by the contractor doubting it was even possible. It turns out that it was feasible and was completed without any problems. However, the whole project of adding a second bridge and renovating the old one has ran 2 years behind schedule. The renovation added 30 years to the life of the bridge.


DSC_0010.jpg by Jeroen van Lieshout, on Flickr


DSC_0002.jpg by Jeroen van Lieshout, on Flickr
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Old December 11th, 2016, 04:01 PM   #14080
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Why did the new span went so late? That is not common in Netherlands (at least in the recent past).
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