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Old December 27th, 2008, 01:31 PM   #281
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WESTWOOD
May 2nd, 1949
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Old December 27th, 2008, 01:39 PM   #282
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Old January 1st, 2009, 03:34 AM   #283
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Let there be Light!
California Historical Society
On December 30, 1882, at roughly 7:40pm, Mayor Homer Toberman threw the switch to send current to the first two arc lights installed by the Los Angeles Electric Company. The two were 1000-candle power lamps installed on top of 150-foot poles at the intersections of Main and Commercial and 1st and Hill.

Current to power the lights came from a small generating plant built at the corner of Alameda and Banning, just north of the present-day intersection of 1st and Alameda. The plant could supply a meager 30 kilowatts.

By 1889 the utility had 235 customers, including private lights on the outside of stores. In 1890 it opened its first alternating-current plant, and a Times writeup saying that it "will run fifteen hundred lights of sixteen-candle power, and can be run for seven miles."

Los Angeles Times
The City in Detail
December 3, 1891
Los Angeles was the first city in the United States to entirely abandon gas for street lighting and replace it by electricity, which was done January 1, 1883. It is today one of the best lighted cities in the Union. The high masts on which the lamps are hung throw a useful light a mile distant, and are visible far out at sea. The city is now lighted with 242 electric lamps, aggregating 633,000 candle power. Of these 113 are on thirty-four masts 150 feet high, the balance on poles twelve to fifty feet high, or suspended at street intersections, etc. The length of circuit is eighty-five miles. The price paid by the city is $12 per 2000 candle power per month. The Los Angeles Electric Company, which has also an incandescent system, largely patronized, finds its present quarters too cramped and is about to build a large new power-house near the Arcade depot.
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Old January 7th, 2009, 09:04 AM   #284
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Did You Know:
Hotel Figueroa was Built for Businesswomen?
usc digital
Tuesday, January 06, 2009, at 12:08PM
Did you know that the Hotel Figueroa was built in 1926 as a hotel for "business, traveling and professional women and their husbands and children"?

The 409-room was built by the Y.W.C.A., and was billed in the L.A. Times as the "one of the largest financial transactions ever consummated by a body of organized women."

Designed and built by Stanton, Reed & Hibbard, the structure cost $1,250,000. The top nine were exclusively for women, while the bottom two were for men with families.

Ground was broken on September 28, 1925, and the cornerstone was laid on January 18, 1926. Into the cornerstone were placed the hotel's business documents, a "short historical sketch" of the Y.W.C.A., and a roster of the organization's directors and officers from its beginning in 1893 and the current group from 1926. The building was formally opened on August 15, 1926, with a dinner-dance in the Fountain Floor ballroom.

In building the hotel, though, the Y.W.C.A. appears to have overstepped its abilities. In February of 1928, the group opened a fundraising campaign to try and free the organization from its debts. A mortgage bond on the hotel was soon to come due, and the group was worried about losing it. It's not clear whether or not that ended up taking place, but by later that year the hotel had a male manager.
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Old January 20th, 2009, 08:31 PM   #285
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Old January 27th, 2009, 12:36 PM   #286
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Thanks for that, Soupy. I know there are hours and hours and hours of video including the brand new super slow mo video from the early eighties that are being held back by ABC for some reason. Think maybe it's time to bring it out in a special of some sort.
It would play for a week on television but I would gladly purchase it for myself
The best, most historic time for us.
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Old January 28th, 2009, 10:34 AM   #287
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Sunday, January 25, 2009
Dutch Chocolate Tiles of Los Angeles

I'm fascinated with these photographs of the old Dutch Chocolate Shop in downtown Los Angeles. It may have been one of the most spectacular interiors in the the city. Just look at this place!

Opened in 1914 to satisfy the new fad for hot chocolate,
the architectural firm of Plummer and Feil commissioned ceramic tile-maker Ernest Batchelder to do the interior.

According to Batchelder historian Robert Winter, the cocoa-brown interior was modeled after a "kind of German bierstube, with arches and vaults covered with tiles."
The tiles, all made in Batchelder's Pasadena studio, were sculptured with fanciful Dutch scenes...the windmillls of Holland, dairy maids in wooden shoes, chandeliers of glass milk buckets...
Even more astounding, is this chocolatey interior still exists today, though in disrepair, serving as a souvie mini-mall for street vendors.

If anyone has the means to rescue this gem and restore it, I want to help!
Los Angeles still needs a good place to get a hot chocolate.
Miehana/Flickr
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Old January 28th, 2009, 12:15 PM   #288
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Old January 28th, 2009, 12:24 PM   #289
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trailor park
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Old January 29th, 2009, 02:30 AM   #290
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Where is it located?
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Old January 30th, 2009, 12:16 AM   #291
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Imperfect Ending View Post
Ovaltine


Give me a delicious , hot cup of MILO instead please!!

Well actually they're both good. A nice cup of hot cocoa beats a cup of joe anyday! It's perfect on a chilly morning.

I'm with Milqy on this, it's very hard to find a decent place for a cup of hot chocolate in Los Angeles these days.

And I'm tired of the over saturation of Starbucks in this city....Milqy needs to gather every penny he has under his seat cushions and restore this baby pronto!!

Dutch influenced architecture is so rare in LA. How about a little piece of Solvang in Downtown LA? So whaddya say Milqy??
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Old January 30th, 2009, 12:40 AM   #292
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_trance011 View Post
Dutch influenced architecture is so rare in LA. How about a little piece of Solvang in Downtown LA? So whaddya say Milqy??
Oops, my bad! Solvang is a Danish-themed town north of Santa Barbara and its not Dutch at all. LOL It's a very nice and picturesque little town, I must say.
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Old January 30th, 2009, 05:22 AM   #293
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Kevin Kidney wrote that article, but I agree. I likes chocolate. Could not locate the address though...
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Old February 7th, 2009, 08:55 AM   #294
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Only in L.A.
Steve Harvey

The colorful saga of
Los Angeles' first subway tunnel

Los Angeles Conservancy conducts a tour of the subway tunnel once used
by the Red Cars that ran between downtown and Glendale Boulevard near 1st Street.

After rail service ended, the mile-long route was used as a storage site for survival rations and impounded vehicles, as a movie set and then as a giant graffiti canvas.


What a strange ride it has been for L.A.'s first subway.


Shut down in 1955, the Belmont Tunnel went from being a commuter route for rail passengers between downtown and the Westlake district to a storage site for survival rations, a holding cell for impounded vehicles, a movie set and, unofficially, a giant graffiti canvas and field of study for urban explorers.

Along the way, the mile-long subterranean route acquired an aura of mystery.

"I used to hop the fence and . . . find half-burnt candles, chalk drawings of odd stick figures, and altar-type things, flowers and cornmeal, spread around," one tunnel visitor wrote on the Flickr photo website. "One night we found two headless chickens. One was black and the other was white."

Another tunnel trekker found, among the trash, a nurse's excuse for a student "to leave Belmont High School. . . . It's kind of hard to imagine this as the choice hangout for someone ditching school."

Still another underground adventurer discovered an abandoned car deep inside. Was it a forgotten impound?

The tunnel's grim fate was, of course, unforeseen by those who attended the grand opening of the Pacific Electric Railroad's subway in 1925, an event highlighted by the christening of a Red Car with a bottle of ginger ale (ahem, it was Prohibition).

The $5-million system -- such expense! -- enabled passengers to board a trolley at 4th and Hill streets and beat the traffic by traveling underground to the mouth of the tunnel at 2nd Street, near the intersection of Beverly and Glendale boulevards. From there, the trolley clanked along through the pre-smog air to Hollywood.

As the years went by, Los Angeles became infected with automania. Citizens moved to the suburbs and preferred to leave the driving to themselves, and complaints about train-versus-car accidents increased. Ridership declined.

The subway was shut down in 1955, its tracks ripped out. The last Red Car on that route carried a destination sign that said, "To Oblivion."

Then began the weird afterlife of the tunnel.


During the Cold War, it was used to store 329,700 pounds of crackers, said to be enough to feed 69,940 people for 14 days after a nuclear attack. (How the 69,940 would be chosen was not revealed).

Later, the tunnel took in vehicles seized in drug cases. The cars didn't squash any of the crackers; that food had been shipped to Utah in 1969 after the tunnel sprang a leak.

In the mid-1970s, Hollywood came calling, giving the tunnel a role in the movie "MacArthur," starring Gregory Peck. It stood in for the Malinta Tunnel on Corregidor Island in the Philippines, the scene of heavy fighting during World War II.

Hopes of resuscitating the subway as a rail service ended in the 1970s when one portion of the tunnel was filled when foundations for the Bonaventure Hotel were built. No one took much notice. What use could there be for an urban rail line in this modern age anyway?

By the early 1980s, The Times reported, the tunnel area had become "the internationally recognized epicenter of West Coast graffiti . . . featured in magazines, photography books. . . . Taggers come from all over."

And then a new mystery cropped up: The tunnel disappeared, sort of. At least its mouth was no longer visible to passersby on 2nd Street.

What happened was the Belmont Station Apartments, a 275-unit complex, opened in 2008 on the site of an old rail yard in front of the opening.

Actually, the tunnel's terminus can still be glimpsed from a side street, Toluca Street, as can an old electric substation, Toluca No. 51, which provided the power for the subway cars. The transformation of the two landmarks is startling.

All the graffiti was erased by sandblasting, no easy task.

"There were between 150 and 200 coats of paint on the station," said Paveena Prayonsirisak, the apartment manager. "I took a little chip myself. This is a part of history."

The tunnel, now sealed, is covered by artist Tait Roelofs' colorful mural of a Red Car, which glows in the dark. That's L.A. for you: a make-believe light at the end of a tunnel that once was part of a real-life rail transit system.

steveharvey9@gmail.com
photo Paul Morse
Steve Harvey
Los Angeles Times
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Old February 23rd, 2009, 09:50 AM   #295
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What would we look like if we was the least?
February 21, 1944
THIS IS UNUSUAL -- Snow flurries and a violent 10-minute hailstorm laid a white canopy over most of Los Angeles yesterday. This scene was taken at First and Spring Sts., where snow and hail left a patchwork of "ice floes" on streets and City Hall lawn.
UCLA Digital
Los Angeles Times
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Old February 25th, 2009, 07:06 AM   #296
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Here is how the Belmont Tunnel and Substation looked back in September 08.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Compared to how it looked before the developers moved in:

image hosted on flickr


Flickr (evie.mcskeevy)
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 10:52 PM   #297
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I'm new to this forum... and very glad I found it. What GREAT photos and info!

I have some images to share. I found a box of slides at a camera show that someone took of Laguna, circa 1947. The house they were apparently visiting was on Cliff Drive. Would love to see what the neighborhood looks like now. As soon as I am approved to upload attachments I'll share these slides of how it looked when they started building Laguna.
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Old April 3rd, 2009, 05:51 AM   #298
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Welcome Andrew.
I have some slides from around the same time of Malibu and beaches north. I'm waiting for my Uncle's brother to die so I can take them over.
Slides make wonderful large size pictures and I'll bet yours are colorful in a 'technicolor' sort of way, aren't they?
It was beautiful back then- north or south
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Old April 4th, 2009, 05:33 AM   #299
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
Only in L.A.
Steve Harvey

The colorful saga of
Los Angeles' first subway tunnel

Los Angeles Conservancy conducts a tour of the subway tunnel once used
by the Red Cars that ran between downtown and Glendale Boulevard near 1st Street.

After rail service ended, the mile-long route was used as a storage site for survival rations and impounded vehicles, as a movie set and then as a giant graffiti canvas.


What a strange ride it has been for L.A.'s first subway.


Shut down in 1955, the Belmont Tunnel went from being a commuter route for rail passengers between downtown and the Westlake district to a storage site for survival rations, a holding cell for impounded vehicles, a movie set and, unofficially, a giant graffiti canvas and field of study for urban explorers.

Along the way, the mile-long subterranean route acquired an aura of mystery.

"I used to hop the fence and . . . find half-burnt candles, chalk drawings of odd stick figures, and altar-type things, flowers and cornmeal, spread around," one tunnel visitor wrote on the Flickr photo website. "One night we found two headless chickens. One was black and the other was white."

Another tunnel trekker found, among the trash, a nurse's excuse for a student "to leave Belmont High School. . . . It's kind of hard to imagine this as the choice hangout for someone ditching school."

Still another underground adventurer discovered an abandoned car deep inside. Was it a forgotten impound?

The tunnel's grim fate was, of course, unforeseen by those who attended the grand opening of the Pacific Electric Railroad's subway in 1925, an event highlighted by the christening of a Red Car with a bottle of ginger ale (ahem, it was Prohibition).

The $5-million system -- such expense! -- enabled passengers to board a trolley at 4th and Hill streets and beat the traffic by traveling underground to the mouth of the tunnel at 2nd Street, near the intersection of Beverly and Glendale boulevards. From there, the trolley clanked along through the pre-smog air to Hollywood.

As the years went by, Los Angeles became infected with automania. Citizens moved to the suburbs and preferred to leave the driving to themselves, and complaints about train-versus-car accidents increased. Ridership declined.

The subway was shut down in 1955, its tracks ripped out. The last Red Car on that route carried a destination sign that said, "To Oblivion."

Then began the weird afterlife of the tunnel.


During the Cold War, it was used to store 329,700 pounds of crackers, said to be enough to feed 69,940 people for 14 days after a nuclear attack. (How the 69,940 would be chosen was not revealed).

Later, the tunnel took in vehicles seized in drug cases. The cars didn't squash any of the crackers; that food had been shipped to Utah in 1969 after the tunnel sprang a leak.

In the mid-1970s, Hollywood came calling, giving the tunnel a role in the movie "MacArthur," starring Gregory Peck. It stood in for the Malinta Tunnel on Corregidor Island in the Philippines, the scene of heavy fighting during World War II.

Hopes of resuscitating the subway as a rail service ended in the 1970s when one portion of the tunnel was filled when foundations for the Bonaventure Hotel were built. No one took much notice. What use could there be for an urban rail line in this modern age anyway?

By the early 1980s, The Times reported, the tunnel area had become "the internationally recognized epicenter of West Coast graffiti . . . featured in magazines, photography books. . . . Taggers come from all over."

And then a new mystery cropped up: The tunnel disappeared, sort of. At least its mouth was no longer visible to passersby on 2nd Street.

What happened was the Belmont Station Apartments, a 275-unit complex, opened in 2008 on the site of an old rail yard in front of the opening.

Actually, the tunnel's terminus can still be glimpsed from a side street, Toluca Street, as can an old electric substation, Toluca No. 51, which provided the power for the subway cars. The transformation of the two landmarks is startling.

All the graffiti was erased by sandblasting, no easy task.

"There were between 150 and 200 coats of paint on the station," said Paveena Prayonsirisak, the apartment manager. "I took a little chip myself. This is a part of history."

The tunnel, now sealed, is covered by artist Tait Roelofs' colorful mural of a Red Car, which glows in the dark. That's L.A. for you: a make-believe light at the end of a tunnel that once was part of a real-life rail transit system.

steveharvey9@gmail.com
photo Paul Morse
Steve Harvey
Los Angeles Times
What a fantastic story!

Thanks a million for posting. Just love the hell out of these articles and even better when we get stories of those that lived in these early eras of LA.
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Old April 5th, 2009, 06:55 PM   #300
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The 2016 Olympic Bid
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