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Old November 21st, 2010, 06:14 AM   #17741
EuroVison
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Nice pictures. That One World Trade Center will really look nice.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 07:46 AM   #17742
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What is that long white beam seen is picture 18?
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Old November 21st, 2010, 08:12 AM   #17743
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...it's rigging. They must have been lifting something long and awkward.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 08:44 AM   #17744
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look.....nothing was wrong with the original design....the facade had close spaced columns because people may feel uncomfortable with wide glass at such high levels...in the late 60's this was incredible height! The facade and core carried all the load all the floorspace between the core and the facade was clear...........the events of 9/11 only showed the one failing of this design. When this project was designed %#@&* in this world weren't taken into consideration....... In the end...we win...because those $#^&# are cretins who don't have a future in the real world just hide in caves...IMO
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Old November 21st, 2010, 11:45 AM   #17745
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November 20th, Chris Miller ... purdycom

image hosted on flickr
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Old November 21st, 2010, 01:50 PM   #17746
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philly Bud View Post
The very first skyscrapers appeared around 125 years ago. I wonder what the architects and engineers of those times would have thought of the glass curtain walls and other engineering marvels and technology of today?
Louis Sullivan would happily have used them, and said so in his writings. But he understood his market. Hence Beaux Arts and Neoclassical cladding.

Impossible to say what they'd make of 1WTC or the Shard. I suspect they'd like them very much, doubt they'd be amazed. A safe bet most would have enjoyed access to current materials science and the speed of engineering calculation now.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 06:37 PM   #17747
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When it passes Goldman Sachs' new building it is seriously on the way.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 07:01 PM   #17748
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Impressive progress. It seems that the construction process is going faster now ! Good for New York
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Old November 21st, 2010, 07:07 PM   #17749
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Towards The Sun View Post
What is that long white beam seen is picture 18?
It's a spreader used for lifting the blue netting panels. if you look at some of the other pictures you will see that they use both cranes together to lift an entire side at once.
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Old November 21st, 2010, 11:25 PM   #17750
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glidescube View Post
Why does this tower have so few vertical columns when the originals had so many?
The architect for the Twin Towers was afraid of heights so he made the windows small with lots of small columns.

Tower One has far fewer, much thicker, columns made from much stronger steel making it possible to have exterior walls of nearly uninterrupted glass.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 12:05 AM   #17751
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zensteeldude View Post
The architect for the Twin Towers was afraid of heights so he made the windows small with lots of small columns.

Tower One has far fewer, much thicker, columns made from much stronger steel making it possible to have exterior walls of nearly uninterrupted glass.
In the originals the outer walls were an integral part of the structure, supporting the floors. In virtually all other tall buildings the outer walls are just a facade, and offer no support at all.

It was a trade off between large windows and column-free office space.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 12:19 AM   #17752
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinoVabec View Post
November 20th, Chris Miller ... purdycom

image hosted on flickr
this is a very nice photo of lower Manhattan but does anyone know what is under construction next to South Ferry ?
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 12:43 AM   #17753
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philly Bud View Post
The very first skyscrapers appeared around 125 years ago. I wonder what the architects and engineers of those times would have thought of the glass curtain walls and other engineering marvels and technology of today?


This building is Oriel Chambers in Liverpool, designed by the architect Peter Ellis and built 145 years ago. It is reputed to be the first building to have a metal frame and to have a glass curtain walling system. As such it is seen as the precursor of the modern skyscraper.

I think this proves that the glass faced skyscraper was a technical possibility from the earliest times but that the ruling formality of the day prevented it from being widely developed. Certainly this building came in for a lot of criticism when first built.

Certainly pre-WWII architects such as Mies Van der Rohe dreamed of building glass towers.

I believe though that the reason we have so many glass-faced buildings nowadays is that the earlier masonry is prohibitively expensive. In skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building and Chrysler Buildings, the shear solidity of the masonry cladding stiffened the steel frame and gave the whole building structural strength. When it was no longer possible to build with masonry, more complex structural systems had to be evolved such as the shell and core system of the original World Trade Center.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 01:17 AM   #17754
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Thought Flatron Building is NYC's first and oldest skyscraper? BTW, how is it related to WTC 1? Please stay on topic, thanks!

I love the process of WTC 1! I also like how cladding is turning out so far.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 01:32 AM   #17755
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When is it expected to surpass 7WTC?
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 02:00 AM   #17756
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin S View Post

This building is Oriel Chambers in Liverpool, designed by the architect Peter Ellis and built 145 years ago. It is reputed to be the first building to have a metal frame and to have a glass curtain walling system. As such it is seen as the precursor of the modern skyscraper.

I think this proves that the glass faced skyscraper was a technical possibility from the earliest times but that the ruling formality of the day prevented it from being widely developed. Certainly this building came in for a lot of criticism when first built.

Certainly pre-WWII architects such as Mies Van der Rohe dreamed of building glass towers.

I believe though that the reason we have so many glass-faced buildings nowadays is that the earlier masonry is prohibitively expensive. In skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building and Chrysler Buildings, the shear solidity of the masonry cladding stiffened the steel frame and gave the whole building structural strength. When it was no longer possible to build with masonry, more complex structural systems had to be evolved such as the shell and core system of the original World Trade Center.
They are working on materials that are transparent and stronger than steel. So expect to see even more transparent buildings in future with things like transparent columns.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 02:11 AM   #17757
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinoVabec View Post
You mean the glass on the frame or cladding piece to the building?
The glass on the frame
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 02:24 AM   #17758
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zensteeldude View Post
The architect for the Twin Towers was afraid of heights so he made the windows small with lots of small columns.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev Stickleback View Post
In the originals the outer walls were an integral part of the structure, supporting the floors. In virtually all other tall buildings the outer walls are just a facade, and offer no support at all.

It was a trade off between large windows and column-free office space.
your both right, no need to quote him and try to correct him when he is 100% correct.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 03:52 AM   #17759
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin S View Post

This building is Oriel Chambers in Liverpool, designed by the architect Peter Ellis and built 145 years ago. It is reputed to be the first building to have a metal frame and to have a glass curtain walling system. As such it is seen as the precursor of the modern skyscraper.
Thanks for posting the picture, Martin ... it's a most elegant building. I hope they consider it a historic landmark so that it will never be demolished. This is a revolutionary step and truly a precursor to modern glass curtain wall skyscrapers such as One World Trade Center.

When I was referring to the earliest skyscrapers what I had in mind was the 10 story Home Insurance Building in Chicago (1885) or the 10 story Wainwright Building (1891) in St. Louis, which may be considered true skyscrapers because they had elevators to transport people to the higher floors.
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Old November 22nd, 2010, 04:03 AM   #17760
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev Stickleback View Post
In the originals the outer walls were an integral part of the structure, supporting the floors. In virtually all other tall buildings the outer walls are just a facade, and offer no support at all.

It was a trade off between large windows and column-free office space.
You have no idea what you are talking about. You should stick to soccer and leave engineering to us engineers.

Last edited by Zensteeldude; November 22nd, 2010 at 04:11 AM.
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