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Old December 13th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #561
hkskyline
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Canadian safety board cites pilot error in 2005 Air France crash
12 December 2007





TORONTO (AP) - Canadian regulators investigating an Air France plane that skidded off a runway and burst into flames at a Toronto airport in 2005 said Wednesday it came in too high and too fast, and called for mandatory standards for landing in thunderstorms.

Canada's Transportation Safety Board said flight crews should always have to estimate the distance needed for landing in severe weather and called for more safety zones at the end of runways.

In their final report into the August 2005 crash of Air France Flight 358, investigators reiterated earlier findings that the aircraft landed too far down the runway. All 297 passengers and 12 crew members survived, suffering only minor injuries after the plane skidded into a ravine and burst into flames.

Many of the passengers have blamed the pilots for landing nearly halfway down the runway in poor weather and are suing the airline for negligence.

"There can be no doubt that the story of Air France flight 358 is a story of survival, a story of the survival of all 309 people on board. Even so I'm certain all on board that day will tell you that no one should have to go through what they went through," Transportation Safety Board Chair Wendy Tadros said.

"With shifting winds and limited visibility it came in too high and too fast, touching down almost halfway along the wet and slippery runway. It simply ran out of room."

The plane landed 3,800 feet (1,158 meters) down the 9,000-foot (2,743-meter) runway at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport.

The board made seven recommendations to increase landing safety, noting that since that accident, 10 large aircraft have gone off runways around the world in bad weather.

Key recommendations include a requirement that crews always estimate the distance needed for landing during severe weather and instructions to passengers to leave all carry-on baggage behind during evacuation.

Canadian Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon said he fully supports the intent of the recommendations and said officials are reviewing the report.

Video :
http://www.cbc.ca/clips/rm-hi/dsouza...crash071212.rm
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Old December 13th, 2007, 09:01 AM   #562
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Canadian safety board cites pilot error in 2005 Air France crash
12 December 2007





TORONTO (AP) - Canadian regulators investigating an Air France plane that skidded off a runway and burst into flames at a Toronto airport in 2005 said Wednesday it came in too high and too fast, and called for mandatory standards for landing in thunderstorms.

Canada's Transportation Safety Board said flight crews should always have to estimate the distance needed for landing in severe weather and called for more safety zones at the end of runways.

In their final report into the August 2005 crash of Air France Flight 358, investigators reiterated earlier findings that the aircraft landed too far down the runway. All 297 passengers and 12 crew members survived, suffering only minor injuries after the plane skidded into a ravine and burst into flames.

Many of the passengers have blamed the pilots for landing nearly halfway down the runway in poor weather and are suing the airline for negligence.

"There can be no doubt that the story of Air France flight 358 is a story of survival, a story of the survival of all 309 people on board. Even so I'm certain all on board that day will tell you that no one should have to go through what they went through," Transportation Safety Board Chair Wendy Tadros said.

"With shifting winds and limited visibility it came in too high and too fast, touching down almost halfway along the wet and slippery runway. It simply ran out of room."

The plane landed 3,800 feet (1,158 meters) down the 9,000-foot (2,743-meter) runway at Toronto's Lester B. Pearson International Airport.

The board made seven recommendations to increase landing safety, noting that since that accident, 10 large aircraft have gone off runways around the world in bad weather.

Key recommendations include a requirement that crews always estimate the distance needed for landing during severe weather and instructions to passengers to leave all carry-on baggage behind during evacuation.

Canadian Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon said he fully supports the intent of the recommendations and said officials are reviewing the report.

Video :
http://www.cbc.ca/clips/rm-hi/dsouza...crash071212.rm

Was doing a summer job for Air Canada on the ramp on that day. Was running pre-cleared international bags across the US boarder.

Rainy day, airport was shut down for all except for landings for planes that doesn't have fuel. We were actually sitting under a bridge out side of T2 when we saw this thing came down. I could swear I thought it was going for a touch and go because it obviously was going to overrun the runway.

Heard from pilots who's in the air at the time that the Air France guys was diverted towards Ottawa at first, but the French pilots did not want to go there, so they told Pearson control that they were out of fuel.

Judging by the amount of time that plane burned after the crash, I don't think it was out of fuel.
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Old December 13th, 2007, 01:03 PM   #563
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http://news.sympatico.msn.ctv.ca/Top..._report_071212

Runways fall short of standards: Air France report
12/12/2007 9:47:48 PM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Transportation Safety Board has issued seven recommendations in the wake of the 2005 crash of an Air France jet at Toronto's Pearson International airport.


CTV.ca News Staff

Crash investigators examine the wreckage of Air France flight 358 at Pearson Airport in Toronto the day after the crash.
"We think more most be done to ensure that aircraft always touch down safely," Wendy Tadros, the board's chair, told a news conference in Toronto on Wednesday.

Five deal with crew training issues, and two with trying to minimize injuries in the wake of such incidents.

Those recommendations include:

Enhanced training for flight crews;
A requirement that crews always calculate the distance needed for landing during severe weather;
An increase in safe areas at the end of runways;
Instructing passengers to leave all carry-on baggage behind during an aircraft evacuation.
The crash occurred on Aug. 2, 2005. Air France Flight 358 was landing during a heavy afternoon thunderstorm.

The aircraft overshot the runway and burst into flames as it came to a halt. However, no one among the 297 passengers or 12 crew on the Airbus A340-300 died.

The report makes the following points about the flight's final moments:

Aircraft that had landed three and six minutes before Flight 358 had reported poor braking action;
The planned airspeed on final approach was 140 knots; the tailwind component increased the groundspeed relative to the airspeed, but the pilot felt landing was still safer than aborting.
The aircraft was about 90 feet above the threshold; the norm is 50 feet.
The aircraft touched down about 3,800 feet from the threshold of the 9,100-foot runway; the normal point landing point is about 1,000 feet from the threshold.
Once the aircraft touched down, there was a delay in engaging the rear thrusters, partly because the flight crew was struggling to keep the plane aligned with the runway;
With less than 2,000 feet of runway left, the aircraft was moving at 120 knots per hour. The heavy rain meant the crew had little forward visibility;
The aircraft left the end of the runway still travelling at about 80 knots with the brakes fully engaged and the engines at full reverse thrust. It came to rest in a ravine about 1,000 feet from the runway's end. "It had been badly damaged in the process and was on fire when it stopped," said Real Levasseur, the lead investigator.
Evacuation took about two minutes and utilized four of eight exits. Ten passengers and two crew members suffered serious injuries. Tadros said more than 50 per cent of passengers stopped evacuating to retrieve their carry-on baggage from the plane.

"If everybody just slows down by even 10 seconds, lives can be lost," she said.

The report notes that since the Air France crash, 10 more jetliners around the world have overshot runways while landing in bad weather.

"It's really important for pilots to know when they should and should not land and we think there need to be limits there in thunderstorms," Tadros told CTV Newsnet on Wednesday.

"If you look at the situation in Toronto on that day, it was a very localized, very intense storm, but very localized. When pilots come in to destination, they always have an alternate."

Since accidents can still happen, there should be a 300-metre safe area at the end of runways or an alternate means of bringing an aircraft to a halt, Tadros said.

She maintained the extension of an airport's runway safety area and implementation of runway-arresting gear, technology already being used in the U.S., should be a feasible change.

"If you're not able to physically extend the runway end you can put in an arresting system so that if you do have an aircraft go off the runway, nobody will be hurt," she said.

Raul Bramer, who was on board the aircraft when it crashed, said longer runways at airports are a needed safety measure.

"(The pilot) might have had a chance to take off again," Bramer said Wednesday.

Levasseur said the report wasn't trying to point fingers: "We don't blame crews. This is not our job. It doesn't serve any purpose to do that."

Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon said in a news release that his department "fully supports the intent of the recommendations.'

"Officials are currently reviewing the contents of the report,'' he said. "Our government's priority is to help ensure the safety and security of the transportation system.''

With a report from CTV's Austin Delaney
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Old December 14th, 2007, 09:19 AM   #564
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FACTBOX-Safety recommendations on Air France crash

Dec 12 (Reuters) - A Canadian investigation into the August 2005 crash of an Air France jet at Toronto's Pearson International Airport has recommended clear rules and better pilot training to improve the safety of airliners landing in severe weather.

The Transportation Safety Board noted the Airbus A340 came in too high and too fast in a heavy thunderstorm. It ran out of space on a slippery runway and plunged into a small ravine where it burst into flames.

All 297 passengers and 12 crew escaped. No one died.

The Canadian government has 90 days to decide what to do with the recommendations from the TSB. The board has no formal international influence, but foreign counterparts usually respond to such reports.

The TSB's seven recommendations to Canadian and other civil aviation authorities were:

1) The Department of Transport establish clear standards limiting approaches and landings in convective weather for all air transport operators at Canadian airports.

2) France's Direction Generale de l'Aviation Civile and other civil aviation authorities establish clear standards limiting approaches and landings in convective weather.

3) The Department of Transport mandate training for all pilots involved in Canadian air transport operations to better enable them to make landing decisions in deteriorating weather.

4) France's Direction Generale de l'Aviation Civile and other civil aviation authorities mandate training for air transport pilots to better enable them to make landing decisions in deteriorating weather.

5) The Department of Transport and other civil aviation authorities require crews to establish the margin of error between landing distance available and landing distance required before conducting an approach into deteriorating weather.

6) The Department of Transport require all Code 4 runways to have a 300-metre runway end safety area (RESA) or a means of stopping aircraft that provides an equivalent level of safety.

7) The Department of Transport require that passenger safety briefings include clear direction to leave all carry-on baggage behind during an evacuation. (Reporting by Jonathan Spicer; Editing by Rob Wilson)
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Old January 2nd, 2008, 05:09 PM   #565
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JetBlue receives Canadian Licenses

Looks like the've received both scheduled and charter licenses... any guesses as to which airports they might try in Canada?

Link to CTA Rulings...
Scheduled Service:
http://www.cta-otc.gc.ca/rulings-dec...-A-2007_e.html
Charter:
http://www.cta-otc.gc.ca/rulings-dec...-A-2007_e.html
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Old January 3rd, 2008, 02:56 AM   #566
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No guesses from me, although I know B6 were at YYZ in the late fall, looking at gate and counter space availability....word I heard is that the license applications were just a formality, and that there are no plans at the moment for anything to Canada....mind you, in this business, never say never....

Wonder which airline will be the first to announce new or additional service to YYZ in 2008?

Last edited by yyzer; January 3rd, 2008 at 03:04 AM.
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Old January 7th, 2008, 06:50 AM   #567
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so whats new here...?
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Old January 10th, 2008, 05:37 AM   #568
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Passengers placed in quarantine at Toronto airport after travelers fall ill on flight
9 January 2008

TORONTO (AP) - Over 70 passengers returning from Tel Aviv were placed in quarantine at Toronto's Pearson International airport Tuesday night after a number of travelers became ill during the flight. Three passengers were taken to hospital.

The plane, Air Canada flight 085 from Tel Aviv, was carrying about 200 passengers.

Air Canada representative Angela Mah said that over the course of the flight, three people traveling with an organized group fell ill, although one passenger said as many as eight were sick.

Public Health Agency of Canada spokesman Alain DesRoche said the three passengers taken to the hopsital were suffering from "acute gastroenteritis." Their symptoms included vomiting, nausea and diarrhea, DesRoche said in a statement.

DesRoche said 75 passengers were initially detained. While 47 were immediately allowed to proceed through customs, 28 went through additional screening before being released.

Some quarantined passengers said they were made to wear white body suits and masks. One complained about the treatment, saying passengers were told little.
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Old January 15th, 2008, 03:11 AM   #569
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Pearson off to a good start in 2008

Attention News Editors:

Only 2 Weeks into 2008 and GTAA Welcomes 1 Millionth Passenger

TORONTO, Jan. 14 /CNW/ - Only two weeks into 2008 and the Greater Toronto
Airports Authority (GTAA) welcomed Toronto Pearson's one millionth passenger.

Dr. Weiping Huang arrived on Air Canada flight 032 from Beijing at 2:45
this afternoon in Terminal 1. "We are very excited to mark the occasion of
one million passengers so early in the year," said Howard Bohan, Vice
President, Operations and Customer Experience. "This shows just how busy
Toronto Pearson is, the importance of the Airport to keep this Region's
economy moving, and reinforces the tremendous value of having new and
efficient facilities to deal with this incredible demand."
A great deal of credit and thanks must be extended to employees of the
GTAA, airlines, and various government agencies that work hard to ensure the
airport is run smoothly.
As the one millionth passenger of the year, Dr. Huang was given one free
year of valet parking service at the Airport as well as 10 complimentary
parking day passes.
Dr. Huang was very pleased to be Toronto Pearson's 1 millionth passenger
this year. "I travel all over the world and I always enjoy coming back through
Pearson. The new facilities here are wonderful and it's a very enjoyable
experience," commented Dr. Huang on arrival at Terminal 1 this afternoon.
The GTAA is the non-share company that operates Toronto Pearson. All
revenue generated by the GTAA is reinvested back into the airport. In 2006,
31 million passengers travelled through Toronto Pearson. Preliminary passenger
numbers for 2007 will be available very shortly. From Toronto, passengers can
reach 76 same-plane international destinations, 28 non-stop Canadian
destinations and 49 non-stop destinations in the United States.
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Old January 16th, 2008, 02:12 AM   #570
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How does this compare to last year? How long did it take last year to reach 1 million passengers?
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Old January 17th, 2008, 06:14 AM   #571
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According to the latest numbers, Etihad's Toronto route is one of the strongest PAX loads they have, averaging between 76% and 80%. Although I haven't seen official numbers yet, I've heard Emirates' loads are even higher. Just wait until these bad boys go daily!
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Old January 18th, 2008, 08:10 AM   #572
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Toronto has the highest passenger load in business class at 81%

http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story_...yId=1093182024
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Old January 19th, 2008, 01:32 AM   #573
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Westjet adding flights at YYZ

Airline adds new destinations

2008-01-18 10:25:24.000

Westjet is adding daily flights from Mississauga's Pearson International Airport to four new Canadian cities beginning in May.
New flights to Regina, Saskatoon, Abbotsford, B.C. and Quebec City will start flying out of Pearson on May 18. The Quebec City route comes as the capital city celebrates the 400th anniversary of its founding.
Bob Cummings, WestJet's executive vice-president of guest experience and marketing, said WestJet will now operate 60 flights a day from the GTA airport.
"We are confident that Canadians will fill the additional seats we are adding to our network," he said.
The airline will also add more flights on its existing daily runs. Toronto to Vancouver flights will increase to eight daily, for example, with increases in frequency to other destinations such as Victoria, Edmonton, Charlottetown, Moncton, Saint John and Deer Lake.
Twice-daily service between Toronto and Las Vegas, which started in October, will continue through the summer. Service between Toronto and Los Angeles, which began last month, will also continue daily throughout the summer.
Service to Puerto Plata and Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic will be extended to year-round, departing once a week from Toronto.
"The addition of these new routes and frequencies will yield greater choice and convenience that will benefit Toronto travellers,” said John Sharp, manager of air service marketing for the Greater Toronto Airports Authority.
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Old January 19th, 2008, 02:44 AM   #574
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Mississauga's Pearson International Airport?
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Old January 19th, 2008, 02:52 AM   #575
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Filip View Post
Mississauga's Pearson International Airport?
Whats so strange? The airport is located in Mississauga, after all.
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Old January 19th, 2008, 02:58 AM   #576
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Quote:
Originally Posted by koolio View Post
Whats so strange? The airport is located in Mississauga, after all.
I doubt 99.9% of the planet knows that...

"Attention passengers, we will be shortly landing at Queens' JFK International Airport, please fasten your seatbelts"
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Old January 19th, 2008, 03:06 AM   #577
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Filip View Post
I doubt 99.9% of the planet knows that...

"Attention passengers, we will be shortly landing at Queens' JFK International Airport, please fasten your seatbelts"
But you knew it, so why the bemusement?
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Old January 19th, 2008, 04:45 PM   #578
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I should have mentioned, that article is from the latest Mississauga News, hence the reference to 'mississauga'...
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Old January 21st, 2008, 04:06 PM   #579
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACT7 View Post
According to the latest numbers, Etihad's Toronto route is one of the strongest PAX loads they have, averaging between 76% and 80%. Although I haven't seen official numbers yet, I've heard Emirates' loads are even higher. Just wait until these bad boys go daily!
Well neither will be going daily anytime soon...
However, with their loads doing so well Emirates
will be bringing the A380 to YYZ once enough frames
have been delivered.
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Old January 22nd, 2008, 12:30 AM   #580
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yyzhyd View Post
Well neither will be going daily anytime soon...
However, with their loads doing so well Emirates
will be bringing the A380 to YYZ once enough frames
have been delivered.
Is that semi-confirmed?
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