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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:12 AM   #941
Jesse276
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlerontheruf View Post
I agree. It's high time the city knocked that utterly unsightly block down. It's an architecturally insignificant part of downtown that really makes the whole block look a little blighted. No need to worry about historic preservation here...I'm pretty sure these buildings were seen as eyesores from day one. Not to mention it stands in the most prime commerical real estate lot in downtown Milwaukee.
There's a spot for a tower 1 block south of these buildings if there's such demand for new offices. There's enough vacant lots around downtown to fill before we start demolishing our history. Just because the owner has let these buildings fall into disrepair doesn't mean that the buildings can't be saved and they don't have value. These are beautiful examples of what our whole downtown once looked like and can add significantly to our downtown again.

How long has it taken for the empty lot on 4th and Wisconsin taken to get developed? Yeah, expect that if these buildings are allowed to fall.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:23 AM   #942
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I don't understand what the big push for ripping these buildings down is coming from. Icon clearly stated in the article that's it's more than willing to repair and redo the facade on those buildings it purchased, but it needs some assistance in order to do so.

While the article also mentions the state of repair and other wishes to demolish the buildings - it won't be happening at this time.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:45 AM   #943
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Originally Posted by brewcityfan View Post
I don't understand what the big push for ripping these buildings down is coming from. Icon clearly stated in the article that's it's more than willing to repair and redo the facade on those buildings it purchased, but it needs some assistance in order to do so..
Not talking about the same building.

And the big issue with the building we ARE talking about is that it is on Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee's "main street". It looks like crap to have rundown empty building sitting around. Not a good impression of the city as a whole.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:52 AM   #944
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Alright but even the building on Wisconsin Ave, which I'm thinking is the one at the end of the article in which an IL firm is looking at either renovating or demolishing. What happens if the firm decides to renovate the building? Unfortunately it's all going to come down to whether or not they find a tenant(s) for the space. If they don't, all of you just might get your wish answered.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 07:50 AM   #945
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlerontheruf View Post
I agree. It's high time the city knocked that utterly unsightly block down. It's an architecturally insignificant part of downtown that really makes the whole block look a little blighted. No need to worry about historic preservation here...I'm pretty sure these buildings were seen as eyesores from day one. Not to mention it stands in the most prime commerical real estate lot in downtown Milwaukee.
This very same thing has been said about countless older buildings all across the city...and then many of those buildings were painstakingly, lovingly, beautifully restored and now add value to the city. Many of those that have been restored aren't even in historic districts (meaning they lacked some of the protection in place for those that are in such districts), and their owners decided of their own volition to save them, to rehabilitate them, rather than demolishing them because they were run down.

Milwaukee is admired around the country, even around the world, because of its rather strong penchant for historic preservation rather than knock-down, throw-away urbanism. It's one of the reasons why the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed Milwaukee on its annual "Dozen Distinctive Destinations" list last year.

As for the particular buildings at Wisconsin and Broadway, they are significant because they date back to the 1860s-70s, putting them among some of the oldest buildings in Downtown. They are spectacular examples of the 19th century Commercial Italianate style, with distinctive narrow arched windows and hand-carved wooden cornices, much of which is relatively still in tact--with the exception of the street level storefronts that were modernized during the mid-20th century. Aside from its architectural significance, the building is also notable for the fact that it was built by Josiah Noonan, who figured prominently in the pioneer era of Milwaukee and Madison. These are precisely the reasons the City designated those buildings as part of a Downtown historic district twenty years ago, which thankfully makes any demolition requests a little bit more difficult (though unfortunately not impossible) to get approved.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 08:08 AM   #946
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miltown View Post
Billion-dollar building boom
More than a dozen projects proposed for downtown Milwaukee
The Business Journal of Milwaukee - March 23, 2007
by Pete Millard
^ This was a great read. VERY EXCITING STUFF!

Also, I am quite impressed (from just a few things I've read) about Wisconsin's Governor Doyle and his emphasis on economically empowering the Milwaukee area. He sees a recharged Milwaukee as crucial to the state's economy.

But for those of you who live in Wisconsin, do you have any particular thoughts about Doyle? Am I incorrect in praising him, or is he really a man with a good head on his shoulders with some vision?
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Old March 30th, 2007, 08:20 AM   #947
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
^ This was a great read. VERY EXCITING STUFF!

Also, I am quite impressed (from just a few things I've read) about Wisconsin's Governor Doyle and his emphasis on economically empowering the Milwaukee area. He sees a recharged Milwaukee as crucial to the state's economy.

But for those of you who live in Wisconsin, do you have any particular thoughts about Doyle? Am I incorrect in praising him, or is he really a man with a good head on his shoulders with some vision?
Well the majority of Milwaukee posters (I believe) are either independent-leaning-Democrat or Democrat, so I'd say Doyle is well-liked. Unfortunately when politics gets brought up over here it can spiral out-of-control into a shamble. Doyle is a decent governor that is simply doing his own version of trying to push further revitalization and growth in Milwaukee. Gov. Thompson 7 years back also tried in a different fashion, which I feel Miller Park was part of that. Every politician has his/her own way of planning for the future.

One last thing I'll add - I feel that Mayor Barrett has been a bigger support for downtown revitalization through condos and businesses than Governor Doyle. Governor Doyle is just doing his part as governor to ensure Milwaukee gets adequate funding and support from Madison, but I don't think he truly knows the area as well as Mayor Barrett (Doyle was born/lived in the Madison area all his life).
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Old March 30th, 2007, 08:34 AM   #948
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Sounds like a good topic for an brand new entirely separate thread...so this one doesn't get hijacked again.

A "What do you think of the governor?" tangent is something that always takes on a life of its own.

I'd suggest taking it to the main Midwest and Plains subforum, since it's rather broad-based for Development News.

Last edited by Markitect; March 30th, 2007 at 09:01 AM.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:36 PM   #949
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Hear, hear!
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Old March 30th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #950
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The Midwest Airlines Center expansion took a more serious step. The Business Journal has a very large article and I didn't want to take up a whole page on here, so here's the link: http://milwaukee.bizjournals.com/milwaukee/stories/2007/04/02/story1.html?page=1&b=1175486400^1439614

An overall summary is this:
Quote:
A potential $150 million to $200 million expansion of the Midwest Airlines Center will be studied over the next several months as part of an effort to polish Milwaukee's image as a convention destination.

The project would add 100,000 square feet of exhibition space to the downtown convention center, as well as at least 30,000 square feet of meeting rooms and a 20,000-square-foot dining area, said Frank Gimbel, the Milwaukee attorney who chairs the Wisconsin Center District board, the center's governing body.


Gimbel said the project also could include underground parking and a tunnel under Kilbourn Avenue to connect the convention center with the U.S. Cellular Arena and the Milwaukee Theatre, which also are run by the Wisconsin Center District.

The addition would be built on what is now a surface parking lot north of the existing convention center and bordered by Kilbourn and North Sixth, West Wells and North Fourth streets.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 08:05 PM   #951
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heres the whole article realting to the MAC

MIDWEST AIRLINES CENTER EXPANSION STUDY

A potential $150 million to $200 million expansion of the Midwest Airlines Center will be studied over the next several months as part of an effort to polish Milwaukee's image as a convention destination.

The project would add 100,000 square feet of exhibition space to the downtown convention center, as well as at least 30,000 square feet of meeting rooms and a 20,000-square-foot dining area, said Frank Gimbel, the Milwaukee attorney who chairs the Wisconsin Center District board, the center's governing body.

Gimbel said the project also could include underground parking and a tunnel under Kilbourn Avenue to connect the convention center with the U.S. Cellular Arena and the Milwaukee Theatre, which also are run by the Wisconsin Center District.

The addition would be built on what is now a surface parking lot north of the existing convention center and bordered by Kilbourn and North Sixth, West Wells and North Fourth streets.

Expanding the convention center has been on the drawing board ever since the $184 million facility opened in 1998. Gimbel made statements as recently as October 2006 that Milwaukee needed to launch such a project.

However, he said in an interview this week that the situation has become more urgent and the political climate is now more favorable in Madison, where legislators and Gov. Jim Doyle would have to approve tax increases to fund an expansion. In the November elections, Democrats gained control of the state Senate, added seats in the state Assembly and Democrat Doyle won re-election.

Expanding the Midwest Airlines Center, 400 W. Wisconsin Ave., would provide a major boost to Milwaukee's efforts to compete in the convention business, said Doug Neilson, president and chief executive officer of Visit Milwaukee, which is charged with recruiting conventions here.

"We're way behind in the amount of exhibition space," he said.
Political strategy

The feasibility study could be concluded by late summer and, if it recommends going ahead with the expansion, Wisconsin Center officials would need to draft a political strategy, Gimbel said. He anticipates approaching the Legislature in the fall with a request to fund the project by increasing local taxes on hotel rooms, rental cars and food and beverages that fund the convention center.

"There aren't a lot of politicians out there who want to hear from somebody who wants to raise taxes," he said.

The project's cost would depend on whether it will include features such as the tunnel. However, Gimbel provided the $150 million to $200 million figure based on a previous estimate plus inflation.

If the Legislature and Doyle approved funding, the planning for the expansion could begin in 2008. The earliest the project could be completed would be 2010, Neilson said.

The feasibility study would determine whether an expansion would improve Milwaukee's ability to compete with comparable-sized cities and whether such an expansion would increase the convention center's revenue enough to pay back the project costs, Gimbel said.

The existing convention center has nearly 189,000 square feet of exhibition space and a ballroom with more than 37,000 square feet.

At the time Midwest Airlines Center was completed, it was a major upgrade from the old MECCA convention center, but other midsize Midwestern cities -- notably Cincinnati and Indianapolis -- have since expanded their convention centers, Neilson and Gimbel said.

Gimbel said the Wisconsin Center District likely will hire CSL International of Wayzata, Minn., to conduct the study because the firm is familiar with the Milwaukee convention market from earlier studies. The study would cost $75,000 to $200,000, said Richard Geyer, the district's president.

Gimbel's plan for initiating the study drew interest from some Milwaukee-area politicians, but they wanted to reserve judgment on supporting the project until after the study.

Wauwatosa Mayor Theresa Estness said the expansion "should be explored" because of its potential to generate economic development and create jobs.

Pat Curley, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett's chief of staff, said the mayor's office is interested in working with Wisconsin Center officials on the study. Curley said the study would need to determine whether "keeping up with the Joneses" on conventions is the best long-term use of public funds for economic development in Milwaukee.

Curley suggested that, as far as funding such a large project, the district also needs to examine whether it should seek regional funding similar to Miller Park. Currently, taxes supporting the Wisconsin Center come from Milwaukee County. Miller Park's construction was financed with a five-county sales tax.

"Clearly, tourism and conventions are important to the economy of the region," Curley said.

Although Gimbel and others are clamoring for a convention center expansion, the feasibility study needs to be objective, said Wally Morics, Milwaukee city comptroller and a Wisconsin Center board member.

The district would need legitimate financial projections to present to financing sources and bond-rating agencies, he said.

"The study will be independent," Morics said. "It'll show what it will show."

Gimbel insisted that if the CSL determines expanding the Midwest Airlines Center is not feasible, he will "absolutely" follow the recommendation.

City Square feet of convention space
St. Louis 502,000
Minneapolis 480,000
Columbus, Ohio 426,000
Indianapolis 403,700
Kansas City 388,800
Pittsburgh 313,000
Cleveland 275,000
Louisville, Ky. 200,000
Cincinnati 195,320
Milwaukee 189,000


I kind of hope some time in the future a bigger new arena is built where the milw. theatre and us cell. are so that the MAC and arena could be linked together for possible huge events....





******************************************
and from the third ward

Office building planned for Third Ward
biztimes.com

Nashotah-based Hawley Strigenz LLC plans to build a five-story, 150,000-square-foot office and retail building at the northwest corner of Milwaukee Street and Menomonee Street in Milwaukee’s Historic Third Ward. The five-story building, called Catalano Place on the Park, would have about 65,000 square feet of office space, 20,000 square feet of first floor retail space and 158 indoor parking spaces. Details of the project could change, but the building will have as much as 30,000 square feet of office space on a floor.

“A 30,000-square-foot floor plate, that’s going to be the largest floor plate downtown,” said Marianne Burish, a principal with Siegel-Gallagher Inc., which is marketing the building. “No one else has a floor plate that big.”

So far the project has 15,000 square feet of space that has been pre-leased by tenants.

“The goal is to have 30,000 to 40,000 square feet of office space leased (to start construction),” Burish said. “Typically, projects like this get a shovel in the ground because of a major anchor tenant. Like most developers, they’re looking for a large anchor tenant, about 30,000 to 40,000 square feet.”

But even without landing an anchor tenant, Hawley Strigenz could get the project going if another 15,000 to 20,000 square feet of space is leased, Burish said.

If the building lands a large anchor tenant the plans could be adjusted to expand it to a seven-story building with two additional floors, each with 30,000 square feet of office space, Burish said.

The office market in the downtown area is soft, area real estate brokers say, and several developers are trying to find an anchor tenant to get their proposed downtown office buildings under construction.

“We’re one of a handful of developers running around with a picture of a potential building,” Burish said. “We have some users that are looking. You can probably count on one hand the number of (office space) deals in the market, two hands at the most.”

The building was designed by Milwaukee-based La Macchia Group LLC. It would be a “green” building and Hawley Strigenz is hoping for at least a gold LEED certification, Burish said.

The indoor parking spaces, and the building’s modern features, will be major selling points said Dan Mickelsen, assistant vice president of office properties for Siegel-Gallagher.

“There are not a lot of buildings in the Third Ward that can park themselves on site,” Mickelsen said. “It’s going to be the only new construction, class A office building in the Third Ward. It will be more of a typical contemporary office, as opposed to the loft offices typical in the Third Ward.”

A 61-year-old, 33,819-square-foot gray industrial building on the site, formerly used by Beck Carton Corp., will be demolished. Hawley Strigenz bought the building from Beck Carton, which is still using the building but plans to move soon after construction of its new facility in Franklin is complete, Burish said.

Hawley Strigenz is hoping to have the new building complete by the middle of next year. It will take about 12 months to build the building after an anchor tenant is secured, or the office space leasing goal is reached, Burish said.


Last edited by miltown; March 30th, 2007 at 08:11 PM.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 08:42 PM   #952
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markitect View Post
This very same thing has been said about countless older buildings all across the city...and then many of those buildings were painstakingly, lovingly, beautifully restored and now add value to the city. Many of those that have been restored aren't even in historic districts (meaning they lacked some of the protection in place for those that are in such districts), and their owners decided of their own volition to save them, to rehabilitate them, rather than demolishing them because they were run down.

Milwaukee is admired around the country, even around the world, because of its rather strong penchant for historic preservation rather than knock-down, throw-away urbanism. It's one of the reasons why the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed Milwaukee on its annual "Dozen Distinctive Destinations" list last year.

As for the particular buildings at Wisconsin and Broadway, they are significant because they date back to the 1860s-70s, putting them among some of the oldest buildings in Downtown. They are spectacular examples of the 19th century Commercial Italianate style, with distinctive narrow arched windows and hand-carved wooden cornices, much of which is relatively still in tact--with the exception of the street level storefronts that were modernized during the mid-20th century. Aside from its architectural significance, the building is also notable for the fact that it was built by Josiah Noonan, who figured prominently in the pioneer era of Milwaukee and Madison. These are precisely the reasons the City designated those buildings as part of a Downtown historic district twenty years ago, which thankfully makes any demolition requests a little bit more difficult (though unfortunately not impossible) to get approved.
thanks for the info, markitect.
its refreshing to have some pro restoration and pro landmarking proponents on a development thread.
1860s-70s is pretty damn old.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 09:12 PM   #953
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I don't know about that Third Ward building. It looks pretty cheap to me. Does anyone know what's sitting on that site right now?
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Old March 30th, 2007, 09:29 PM   #954
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajknee
I don't know about that Third Ward building. It looks pretty cheap to me. Does anyone know what's sitting on that site right now?
Read the article....
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Old March 31st, 2007, 07:15 AM   #955
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Quote:
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I don't know about that Third Ward building. It looks pretty cheap to me. Does anyone know what's sitting on that site right now?
I think it's alright,,, and it may be able to attract some different types of tenants, rather than the types of tenants that downtown office projects are trying to attract, with the very large floor plans it talks about...
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Old March 31st, 2007, 09:50 PM   #956
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If our business/commerical climate is too low for these developments downtown (LPT,Ovation,etc) then why is this third ward building being proposed?
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Old March 31st, 2007, 11:13 PM   #957
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Originally Posted by djcody
If our business/commerical climate is too low for these developments downtown (LPT,Ovation,etc) then why is this third ward building being proposed?
Think of it like fishing. Each developer puts some bait on a hook (they each put forth proposals), toss them out into the water (they publicize their proposals to get the word out to anyone interested), and then they wait for a fish to bite and reel it in (they land some tenants and get things ready to build). Whichever developers get a bite....they're more likely to have their building built.

But you also must consider that there are certain fish out there who only eat certain kinds of bait (different segments of the office market...some big businesses, some small businesses, and everything in between). So while there may be no bites for the larger projects (tenants who can afford to go into the proposed towers), there may be some developers out there who can catch some of the smaller bites (tenants who can afford to go into some of the smaller proposals).
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Old April 1st, 2007, 12:34 AM   #958
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An impact on Milwaukee area medical development?

Breaking news from the Business Journal:
Quote:
Columbia St. Marys, Froedtert sign letter of intent to form partnership



Columbia St. Marys and Froedtert & Community Health have signed a letter of intent to form a new health system partnership.

The two hospital systems will announce April 1 that Columbia St. Marys and Froedtert have proposed to become one organization, according to a letter sent Friday to Milwaukee-area business executives and obtained by The Business Journal. The two systems would be overseen by one board of directors.

This partnership, if finalized, would allow the two systems to better compete against Aurora Health Care, the largest health care system in Wisconsin.

According to a news release to be issued April 1 and also obtained by The Business Journal, the system would include Columbia St. Marys-Milwaukee Campus, Columbia St. Marys-Columbia Campus, Columbia St. Marys Ozaukee Campus in Mequon, Froedtert Hospital in Wauwatosa and Community Memorial Hospital in Menomonee Falls. It would also include the 28 primary clinics operated by Columbia St. Marys throughout the Milwaukee area.
A merger/agreement between those two groups will make the the largest medical force north of I-94, with Aurora still looking at Advanced and Wheaton Francisican building their outpatient hospital in Franklin. Will there be more development from all medical groups going both ways across the I-94 boundary?
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Old April 1st, 2007, 11:41 AM   #959
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umm whats with all the words being *'s?

Edit: I swear a lot of the words were *'s when I was on at 4am this morning.

Last edited by exit_320; April 1st, 2007 at 09:33 PM.
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Old April 1st, 2007, 02:49 PM   #960
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Some people just have the mouths of sailors....

Actually, read this --> http://www.skyscrapercity.com/announ...hp?f=861&a=342
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