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Old April 5th, 2007, 06:54 AM   #981
ClarkWGriswald
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About Kilbourn...isn't it's bridge across the river the next to be redone, after State St. finishes up?
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Old April 5th, 2007, 07:32 AM   #982
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Originally Posted by i_am_hydrogen
Very typical of the dominant architectural paradigm for low-rise residential infill in Milwaukee. What will it replace?
It will replace a lot that's been vacant for a couple of decades.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClarkWGriswald
About Kilbourn...isn't it's bridge across the river the next to be redone, after State St. finishes up?
Yes, once the State Street Bridge restoration work wraps up (scheduled this June), then the City moves on to restoration of the Kilbourn Bridge.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 08:29 AM   #983
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I know this is a bit off topic but does anyone know where i can find info about the history of the Midwest Airlines Center, or more specifically, the convention center that was there before it was built. I'm having a lot of trouble finding info about it.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 08:41 AM   #984
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or more specifically, the convention center that was there before it was built. I'm having a lot of trouble finding info about it.
Did you search the Milwaukee Public Library? They've got some stuff on the old convention center (MECCA = Milwaukee Exposition Convention Center and Arena).

Go to the online catalog and do a Keyword Search for the words: Milwaukee Convention Center

That'll bring up a bunch of stuff on the old and new convention centers. I

Last edited by Markitect; April 5th, 2007 at 08:48 AM.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 10:02 AM   #985
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Originally Posted by milwaukee-k°benhavn View Post
The book "American Urban Architecture- Catalysts in the design of cities" has an interesting chapter about Kilbourn Ave. and why it has failed as a civic gateway. It's all online, you don't even have to go downtown to get it anymore: http://content.cdlib.org/xtf/view?do...&brand=ucpress
Wow, I read a large portion of this and it is very critical of Milwaukee. For some reasons it is justied, but in others it is thinly veiled hostility. Also, it would be more interesting if the text included side by side references to other cities. The text makes it seem as Milwaukee, as an American city influenced by many ideas of the time, was alone in many of its decisions.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 10:31 AM   #986
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What will it replace?
An empty lot
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Old April 5th, 2007, 12:23 PM   #987
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Originally Posted by Markitect View Post
Did you search the Milwaukee Public Library? They've got some stuff on the old convention center (MECCA = Milwaukee Exposition Convention Center and Arena).

Go to the online catalog and do a Keyword Search for the words: Milwaukee Convention Center

That'll bring up a bunch of stuff on the old and new convention centers. I
Thanks Markitect. I live a few blocks from one so I'll have to take it upon myself to check it out. I ask because I'm doing a group project for an urban planning class about the current convention center and I have to focus on its location (the site's inherent characteristics & it's proximity to other elements of downtown) as well as the history of that specific site.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 04:30 PM   #988
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New Metcalfe Park homes this year?
30 planned for moderate-income residents
By TOM DAYKIN

A plan to build 30 homes in Milwaukee's Metcalfe Park neighborhood that will be rented - and ultimately sold - to moderate-income families is moving forward and will likely result in new housing this year, said the project's developer.

Madison-based developer Gorman & Co., in a partnership with the Milwaukee Urban League, is developing the houses in an area bordered by W. Meinecke Ave. and W. Center, N. 27th. and N. 39th streets.

The houses, with two to four bedrooms, will be leased to families who qualify for below-market rents, ranging from around $675 to $825 a month. Fifteen years after the homes begin renting, they will be available for purchase by their tenants at discounted prices.

That "rent-to-own" strategy has been used in Cleveland to improve homeownership opportunities for lower-income people. This marks the first time it's been tried in southeastern Wisconsin, said Christopher Laurent, Gorman's Wisconsin market president.

"It's a good model for an area that needs catalytic activity," Laurent said. "Clearly, Metcalfe Park has seen a lot of challenges."

Metcalfe Park is one of Milwaukee's poorest neighborhoods. Gorman already has one investment in the area: the $10.6 million Wesley L. Scott Senior Living Community, which recently created 80 apartments for senior citizens at 2800 W. Wright St.

Gorman executives believe that creating homes in Metcalfe Park will help shore up the neighborhood's property values, including the firm's Wright St. project.

Financing for the $5.2 million Metcalfe Park project includes $2.3 million in affordable housing tax credits. Those federal tax credits are given to developers, who then agree to lease apartments or houses at below-market rents. Gorman is selling the tax credits to investors, with the sale proceeds providing equity financing for the project, Laurent said.

The project also is receiving a $1.2 million low-interest loan from the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority, as well as a $400,000 no-interest loan from the authority.

Laurent said the City of Milwaukee is providing $1.3 million in financing, including a $400,000 loan. The remaining $900,000 in city funds will be repaid through property tax revenue generated by the new houses.

The city also is helping to subsidize the project by selling the housing sites - vacant lots valued at $5,000 each - to Gorman for $1 apiece, Laurent said.

Gorman is keeping its costs low by using prefabricated homes. The houses are being built under a contract that Gorman has with Universal Housing Systems LLC, a new Milwaukee company formed by John Daniels and Cory Nettles, both attorneys at Quarles & Brady law firm.

Also, the Milwaukee Urban League will provide credit counseling and home maintenance training for tenants to help them make the transition to homeowners.

The development will help improve Metcalfe Park's physical appearance and create a "pride of ownership" for families living in the homes, said Ralph Hollmon, Milwaukee Urban League president and chief executive officer.

More importantly, it will also help central city families create wealth, which can be transferred from one generation to the next, Hollmon said.

"That's absolutely huge," Hollmon said. "Home ownership is a way for people to invest in something that will appreciate in value."

Mayor Tom Barrett said the program will complement the city's partnership with Metcalfe Park residents on other initiatives, including the targeted investment program.

Under that $500,000 program, the city is providing grants to current neighborhood homeowners for exterior housing repairs. That money will be repaid to the city through property taxes generated by improvements in the neighborhood.

The city's program, along with the Gorman/Urban League project, will continue to focus on improving Metcalfe Park, said Common Council President Willie Hines, who represents the area. Hines cited other developments, including the Roger and Leona Fitzsimonds Branch of the Boys & Girls Club, 3400 W. North Ave., and a Pick 'n Save supermarket (formerly Jewel-Osco) at 2355 N. 35th St.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 05:39 PM   #989
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That book with the chapter on Milwaukee was published in 1992:

Before the Riverwalk
before the removal of the Park East
before the revitalization of the Third Ward
before the development of Commerce Street
long before any developer even considered residential development in Walkers Point
when Brady Street was mostly boarded up and vacant (I took a bus ride down Brady Street in 1992 and I remember the decay vividly)
when the Memonomee Valley was in complete decay, with vacant, shuttered factories where there is now office and commercial development with thousands of jobs,
when the lakefront acreage south of the art museum and north of Summerfest was comprised of crumbling parking lots and a decrepit municipal pier,
when the entire swath of land from the East Pointe Pick n Save to the lakefront was still vacant from the never-built extention Park East freeway,
when the only people who lived downtown lived in single room occupancy low rent hotels ...

I would invite the author of this book back to our city. Maybe he could use us as an example for an upcoming book on how older industrial cities can make a comeback.
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Last edited by milwaukeeunseen; April 5th, 2007 at 05:47 PM.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 08:59 PM   #990
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milwaukeeunseen View Post
That book with the chapter on Milwaukee was published in 1992:

Before the Riverwalk
before the removal of the Park East
before the revitalization of the Third Ward
before the development of Commerce Street
long before any developer even considered residential development in Walkers Point
when Brady Street was mostly boarded up and vacant (I took a bus ride down Brady Street in 1992 and I remember the decay vividly)
when the Memonomee Valley was in complete decay, with vacant, shuttered factories where there is now office and commercial development with thousands of jobs,
when the lakefront acreage south of the art museum and north of Summerfest was comprised of crumbling parking lots and a decrepit municipal pier,
when the entire swath of land from the East Pointe Pick n Save to the lakefront was still vacant from the never-built extention Park East freeway,
when the only people who lived downtown lived in single room occupancy low rent hotels ...

I would invite the author of this book back to our city. Maybe he could use us as an example for an upcoming book on how older industrial cities can make a comeback.
Yes, I understand the time that it was written. My italian grandmother lived off brady street and I played in Cass Street playground when I was younger. My parents grew vegatables in the community garden, which was on the land that was cleared for the park-east but never built. I've been familiar with many of those places for some time.

I guess it just seems like the author saw what they wanted to see. My point is that it seems the author focused on these failings as though they were uniquely Milwaukee things. The author rarely mentioned other cities and when they did, it was in things like referencing New Orleans and San Francisco in how they too, did not complete the overbuilding of their freeway systems. As in the one good thing the author mentions, that was not unique to Milwaukee.

Maybe I'm just giving it too much thought...

Time for a Guiness!
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Old April 5th, 2007, 09:21 PM   #991
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Workforce Development

This was sent out by the Mayor's office today on Milwaukee E-Notify:

A New Direction for Workforce Development

Dear Friends:A healthy economy for Milwaukee will be made up of trained, skilled workers who can fill the needs of local employers and provide incentives for businesses to relocate or expand here. Since I took office in 2004, my Administration has leveraged more than 10,000 jobs. But we must do more. In the past, Milwaukee has not been aggressive in workforce development. Those times are gone. Acting on the recommendations of UWM and the Public Policy, I have asked for the City of Milwaukee to be designated the lead agency for workforce in our region. Currently, 22 out of the top 25 cities in the U.S. operate their workforce initiatives in conjunction with the Mayor's office. The reason is clear: Leadership, plain and simple. I have developed a plan to mobilize the city as a leader in workforce development that will energize our community for workforce excellence. By doing so, we will create more family-supporting jobs, help businesses grow and expand, and strengthen Milwaukee's regional economy.

What can the Mayor and City provide that is currently lacking?

Accountability: Simply put, there is no oversight for Economic Development in our current system. We need to have greater responsibility for workforce development in our community.

Uniting the Community to Close the Skills Gap: We need the investment and commitment of business, faith, and government to address the needs of those who cannot compete in the job market today because they lack adequate jobs skills -- most of whom live in the city of Milwaukee. As Mayor, I have the bully pulpit to do just that.

Credibility with Business: I have worked firsthand with many private companies on workforce development projects. My collaboration with the manufacturing firms Tramont and Bucyrus on worker training programs are just a few examples. Regional Approach: I played a founding role in the Regional Workforce Alliance of Southeast Wisconsin, which is developing strategies and communication networks to attract and retain talent for our growing and new businesses in the Milwaukee 7 region.

Private and Public Grants: I worked to get several grant efforts from both the state and federal governments (GROW, MATC, and WIRED) that have already delivered almost $7.5 million to connect unemployed workers in Milwaukee to jobs in the City and throughout the region. In addition, I secured a $500,000 grant for workforce development from the Bader Foundation, and I'm looking at additional institutions and foundations that have expressed interest in Milwaukee. We need leadership and accountability for these efforts to pay dividends, and thus far I am the only public official prepared to step up and provide it.

Finally, I encourage you to review these recent reports on the current state of workforce development in our community:

OnMilwaukee.com: Picking on PIC: Job training might need to be switched OnMilwaukee.com: More Picking on PIC

Sincerely, Mayor
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Old April 5th, 2007, 10:09 PM   #992
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse276 View Post
I guess it just seems like the author saw what they wanted to see. My point is that it seems the author focused on these failings as though they were uniquely Milwaukee things. The author rarely mentioned other cities and when they did, it was in things like referencing New Orleans and San Francisco in how they too, did not complete the overbuilding of their freeway systems. As in the one good thing the author mentions, that was not unique to Milwaukee.

Maybe I'm just giving it too much thought...
You'll have to read the rest of the book to get a better idea of how that one chapter fits into the context of their theories on urban design. They make case studies of good and bad urban design from several cities throughout the book. Milwaukee happens to have two case studies in the book--the Civic Center and Grand Avenue Mall.
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Old April 5th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #993
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East side condo to start this summer
A $14 million condominium development planned for Milwaukee's east side has sold 30% of its units, with construction to begin by late summer, the developer says.

Cambridge River North, overlooking the Milwaukee River at 2077 N. Cambridge Ave., will have 48 units on five floors, and will take about a year to build. It is being developed one block south of E. North Ave. by Cassidy Realty, which is owned by Cass Stephens.

The development's remaining units have selling prices from $224,900 to $449,900. Most of the units are priced below $300,000.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 12:47 AM   #994
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Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markitect
Did you search the Milwaukee Public Library? They've got some stuff on the old convention center (MECCA = Milwaukee Exposition Convention Center and Arena).

Go to the online catalog and do a Keyword Search for the words: Milwaukee Convention Center

That'll bring up a bunch of stuff on the old and new convention centers. I

Thanks Markitect. I live a few blocks from one so I'll have to take it upon myself to check it out. I ask because I'm doing a group project for an urban planning class about the current convention center and I have to focus on its location (the site's inherent characteristics & it's proximity to other elements of downtown) as well as the history of that specific site.
Hey D-Res, I think that im in your class, your talking about the discussion group thing right?
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Old April 6th, 2007, 08:20 AM   #995
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Riverwest project goes green
Townhouses planned for fall opening
By WHITNEY GOULD
[email protected]
Posted: March 30, 2007

Measured against the big, multi-million-dollar condo projects springing up in and around downtown, the three-unit townhouse complex that will be built this summer in Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood is a piker. Townhouse



Rendering by Chris Socha and Charlie Simonds

A renderings shows Pragmatic Construction's three-unit townhouse complex planned for Milwaukee's Riverwest neighborhood.
Information on Green-Building
Wisconsin Green Building Alliance, 759 N. Milwaukee St., Suite 304, Milwaukee, WI 53202; (414) 224-9422; www.wgba.org.
"Your Green Home" by Alex Wilson; New Society Publishers; $17.95.
Urban Ecology Center, 1500 E. Park Place, Milwaukee WI 53211; (414) 964-8505; has a library stocked with samples of green-building materials.

But what it lacks in greenbacks, the $750,000 Elemental Townhomes development more than makes up for in green features: a roof garden that will help insulate the building and filter storm water runoff; rain gardens; passive solar heating and cooling; solar-heated water as an option; reclaimed materials; concrete walls made from fly ash; water-saving fixtures; and high-efficiency appliances and mechanical systems. The result: This is the greenest project of its kind in Milwaukee, its builders say.

"Everything we're doing here has been done before," says Nikolai Usack, a principal with Pragmatic Construction, the firm behind the complex at the corner of E. Hadley and N. Pierce streets. "We're just putting it together in one place."

"We're trying to show that green-building doesn't have to cost a lot more or look weird," says Juli Kaufmann, another partner. "It can be gorgeous."

And relatively affordable: The three-bedroom, 2.5-bath units, each with a two-car garage, will sell for $249,000 to $275,000. One already is spoken for.

Steve Servais, the third partner, conceded that the vegetative roof adds about $20,000 to the cost of the project. But it will pay for itself in energy saving and durability, he said.

The green roof is interrupted by metal gables that provide shade and direct water to rain gardens. Architect Chris Socha, who designed the complex with Charlie Simonds, said the gables are a nod to the nearby bungalows and Queen Anne flats.

"We wanted to show how you could blend in with the neighborhood but still be contemporary," Socha said.

Ald. Mike D'Amato, who represents the area, called the design "an interesting diversion from neighborhood architecture, but also respectful of it" in scale.

The project needs a minor zoning variance that D'Amato expects will be easily approved. If all goes as planned, construction will start in May and the homes will open this fall.

Located at 2800 N pierce
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Old April 6th, 2007, 08:51 AM   #996
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That little "green" project might become a popular destination spot for people interested in building their own "green" residence. Seeing an example that works will definately give them inspiration to do so.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 11:46 AM   #997
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Originally Posted by miltown View Post
East side condo to start this summer
A $14 million condominium development planned for Milwaukee's east side has sold 30% of its units, with construction to begin by late summer, the developer says.

Cambridge River North, overlooking the Milwaukee River at 2077 N. Cambridge Ave., will have 48 units on five floors, and will take about a year to build. It is being developed one block south of E. North Ave. by Cassidy Realty, which is owned by Cass Stephens.

The development's remaining units have selling prices from $224,900 to $449,900. Most of the units are priced below $300,000.
I was wondering when someone would bring this project up. I live right down the street from it, I can literally see the lot that it's going to be built on from my front porch. This is among a list of small projects going up on the east side that I'm watching closely, another being Greenwich Row which is being built right outside my friends apartment building.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robman2k View Post
Hey D-Res, I think that im in your class, your talking about the discussion group thing right?
Indeed. I was wondering when I'd find someone from that class that knew about this website. It's a real gem. I almost feel like I have an edge because I'm up to speed about so many projects. Hell, had it not been for this website, I don't think I would've done as well on that paper about the 11-story Downer Proposal.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 04:56 PM   #998
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Wow, I'm in that class too. Which discussion are you in? I'm 603.
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Old April 6th, 2007, 05:36 PM   #999
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This is among a list of small projects going up on the east side that I'm watching closely, another being Greenwich Row which is being built right outside my friends apartment building.
where is this project going up exactly?
i like to map these projects so that i can see them tomorrow when im up in milwaukee
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Old April 6th, 2007, 07:06 PM   #1000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mohammed wong View Post
Riverwest project goes green
Townhouses planned for fall opening
By WHITNEY GOULD
[email protected]
Posted: March 30, 2007

And relatively affordable: The three-bedroom, 2.5-bath units, each with a two-car garage, will sell for $249,000 to $275,000. One already is spoken for.
While I agree that this project is overall a pretty good idea...a 2-car garage? That doesn't seem very green to me.
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