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Old January 31st, 2013, 10:29 PM   #1601
437.001
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Important news today announced by Adif.
The links are in Spanish:

-third rail on the classic line between Castellbisbal (Barcelona) and Vila-seca (Tarragona):

http://prensa.adif.es/ade/u08/GAP/Pr...8?Opendocument

-electrification of the classic line Medina del Campo-Salamanca:

http://prensa.adif.es/ade/u08/GAP/Pr...C?OpenDocument

-works on the Bobadilla-Algeciras classic line, sector Algeciras-Almoraima (including the installment of 3rd rail in some sectors):

http://prensa.adif.es/ade/u08/GAP/Pr...1?Opendocument
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Old February 3rd, 2013, 06:45 PM   #1602
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Alaris Barcelona Estaciˇ de Franša-Valencia Nord (complete route, on the back cabin, and edited backwards):

Calling at (backwards) Castellˇn, Benicarlˇ, Vinar˛s, L┤Aldea, L┤Hospitalet de l┤Infant (non-commercial), Salou, Tarragona, Vilanova, BCN-Sants, BCN-Estaciˇ de Franša.

I┤ll edit this a bit later, see you in a while.

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Last edited by 437.001; February 4th, 2013 at 12:25 AM.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 09:36 PM   #1603
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Hi.

Bad luck yesterday for the passengers of the train number 00697, the Alaris Malaga-Barcelona.
They arrived at Barcelona 247 minutes late, and the train couldn┤t get to Barcelona because it hit two people in two different places.
The first accident happened at Chilches (Castellon province). After having cleared the tracks, the train restarted till hitting another person at Cambrils (Tarragona province), and this time the train couldn┤t restart, it broke down, so the passengers had to wait for the next train, which arrived at Barcelona two hours late too (the line in the Cambrils sector is single-track).

Poor train driver, two in a row on the same train...

RIP to the dead (the causes have yet to be cleared, there are a number of real accidents in my area, but suicides of this kind are also relatively common).

Last edited by 437.001; February 5th, 2013 at 09:44 PM.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 09:44 PM   #1604
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The poor driver!

Here in the Netherlands the procedures for when a train hits a person are quite rigorous: the driver is brought away (by taxi) as soon as possible, he then gets support from his supervisor, colleagues and, if needed, psychological support. Passengers are transferred onto buses or another train, the rolling stock is cleaned thoroughly.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 10:03 PM   #1605
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Looks like the first one, at Chilches, was an 82 year-old man, who crossed the tracks instead of using the underpass, and the second one, at Cambrils, was a 30/40 year-old man who commited suicide.

Last edited by 437.001; February 5th, 2013 at 10:13 PM.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 10:10 PM   #1606
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexNL View Post
The poor driver!

Here in the Netherlands the procedures for when a train hits a person are quite rigorous: the driver is brought away (by taxi) as soon as possible, he then gets support from his supervisor, colleagues and, if needed, psychological support. Passengers are transferred onto buses or another train, the rolling stock is cleaned thoroughly.
I remember that DB paid me a taxi from Germany to Netherlands because somebody commited suicide near the border... Luckily for me it was in a previous train... it must be a really unpleasant experience...
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Old February 5th, 2013, 10:15 PM   #1607
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Quote:
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I remember that DB paid me a taxi from Germany to Netherlands because somebody commited suicide near the border... Luckily for me it was in a previous train... it must be a really unpleasant experience...
It is. I┤ve been involved in three, and it┤s not funny at all.
The worst is that in all three cases I wasn┤t on the train that hit the person, but on the one that went right behind it, so I saw all the ketchup.
Controllers SHOULD TELL NOT TO LOOK OUT THE WINDOW in such cases, we didn┤t know it was a run-over, we weren┤t told.

But the worst wasn┤t these three people, but a full herd of goats in La Mancha (in Cinco Casas). This time we were on the hitting train.
You know La Mancha, OriK, trains at full speed for miles and miles. It was rather gore, many people went to the toilet.
The shepherd and his dog were desperate (they weren┤t hit).


Last edited by 437.001; February 5th, 2013 at 10:27 PM.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 10:25 PM   #1608
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It's interesting to see how the various countries are different when it comes to sinister aspects like trains running into people. In my country, all traffic on a section of track is brought to a half when a train hits a person. Traffic remains blocked until the scene of the accident has been cleaned up.

There's a gruesome detail: once a train hits something, the train manager has to go out to see what happened to perform first aid, or to cover up the remains. This is required by law. Since there's a possibility that there's a train that can no longer stop at a station, the idea is to prevent its passengers (for example, school kids) from seeing the drama that has just happened there.

The unions are lobbying to have this law changed, as the experience is very traumatizing while in 9 out of 10 cases it's impossible to perform first aid as the victim has already died.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 10:55 PM   #1609
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While suicides are hard to avoid, raising overall platform heights is a powerful deterrent on accidental crossings, especially those near stations, where some person crosses in the back of a stopped train and misses another one coming at full speed on the opposite direction.

Spain has very low platforms, which make them easy to step in and out of tracks. Netherlands has very high platforms, making it very difficult to climb or go down (you'd need to jump and pull yourself up the other side), and I never recalled having ever seen passengers crossing tracks from platforms on stations (not saying it doesn't happen, just that I never saw it).

Then, once you have a "culture" that accepts crossing tracks on stations (such as not bothering going through underground detours with 2 staircases, or rushing not to miss a train etc), you will also have other people thinking rail tracks are "friendly territory" to walk or venture over.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 11:06 PM   #1610
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Quote:
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While suicides are hard to avoid, raising overall platform heights is a powerful deterrent on accidental crossings, especially those near stations, where some person crosses in the back of a stopped train and misses another one coming at full speed on the opposite direction.
Putting a fence between the two tracks, high enough to prevent jumping
over, will be much less expensive and will achieve the same goal.

But high platforms have other interesting advantages - although very much
less now that we have low floor rolling stock. They are also a hindrance for
track maintenance. This is why almost no network still invests on high
plaftorms today, excepted maybe where they are already deployed
network-wide.
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Old February 5th, 2013, 11:09 PM   #1611
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Then, once you have a "culture" that accepts crossing tracks on stations (such as not bothering going through underground detours with 2 staircases, or rushing not to miss a train etc), you will also have other people thinking rail tracks are "friendly territory" to walk or venture over.
Infrastructure managers put a lot of effort in making it harder for passengers to access the tracks. They do this by placing fences, placing camera's on riskful locations or by building bridges and tunnels to eliminate a crossing. But in the end, they can only do as much as they do now.

You're spot on with your comment about a cultural change being necessary. In the United Kingdom, Network Rail is trying to achieve that with the "See track, think train" campaign:



At the same time, you see something characteristic of the UK: Public Footpaths. These footpaths are freely accessible to anyone, crossing through farmland or deserted areas. A lot of these footpaths run across railway lines, not only local trunk lines, but even 125 mph (200 kph) 4 track main lines such as the Midlands Main Line. Network Rail is working to replace these footpaths with bridges or closing them off altogether, but this takes many, many years to complete.
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Old February 6th, 2013, 07:40 AM   #1612
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Quote:
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Poor train driver, two in a row on the same train...
I doubt the same train driver was involved. A railway company with any sense of decency will send a driver home after such an incident, and bring in a replacement.
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Old February 6th, 2013, 08:15 AM   #1613
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I hope so but I don't know if we have enough drivers...

For example, I read somethere that only in Madrid's Metro there are several suicides per week...

I don't understand why it's a so "popular" method...
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Old February 6th, 2013, 10:18 AM   #1614
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...

well, suicides... once i was the witness of the suicide here in slovakia. while looking out of the window in IC train from bratislava to kosice, i saw the guy who jumped in front of the train, the train stopped immediately. the guy was cut into pieces, i still have in front of my eyes how the police took the parts of his body from below the train....
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Old February 6th, 2013, 10:51 AM   #1615
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I know the area when the second hit was given and, even if commited, there are large areas with housing states and one pass every kilometre or so on.

It is the stretch that keeps waiting for a solution for 16-18 years
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Old February 16th, 2013, 07:45 PM   #1616
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el expreso de la robla cancellation April 2013

Does anyone have information on the reason for the cancellation of the service in April 2013? thanks
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Old February 16th, 2013, 09:35 PM   #1617
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Quote:
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Does anyone have information on the reason for the cancellation of the service in April 2013? thanks
If that┤s accurate (where┤s the source, btw?), Renfe must find it not profitable.
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Old March 17th, 2013, 11:14 PM   #1618
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Here is not the most beautiful train station, but the strangest train station of Spain (and probably Europe, and maybe the world): Santa Susanna station, on the line R1 of the Rodalies Renfe commuter network of Barcelona.

This station is the second most recent one on the line (which on the other hand is the oldest railway line in Spain: the Barcelona to Mataro stretch opened in 1848, although Santa Susanna is on a stretch that opened some time later, in 1859), and it was opened in 2000. Only the Cabrera de Mar-Vilassar de Mar station is more recent on this line.

The very weird thing about this station is its station building: no less than a XVIth-century watchtower (called Torre del Mar, or Torre de la Plana, or also Torre de Can Torrent de Mar), declared of National Cultural Interest and protected as such.
The tower was used as the station building due to its location, right next to the railway track.

Most curious destiny: from watchtower against the pirates, to train station...
Life is strange.

See:



www.santasusanna.org



Wikipedia: Carlos Pino And˙jar



Wikipedia: Carlos Pino And˙jar



Wikipedia: Carlos Pino And˙jar
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Old March 17th, 2013, 11:24 PM   #1619
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I have been at that station a couple of years ago, it was quite remarkable to see such an ancient building being used as a station building.

Back then, I took a train to Barcelona, which was quite a pleasant experience. Given the length and distance of the trip, the price of a return trip was quite pleasant as well.
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Old March 27th, 2013, 08:55 PM   #1620
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Until several decades ago, a railway stretch from Zaragoza to Tortosa was on service. Today it is closed (and all tracks do not remain there) from La Puebla de Hijar.

But tunnels and bridges remains.

In the village of Valdealgorfa they had invited everyone to a very curious detail.

Very close to the village there is a 2,1 km tunnel (quite long, considering the type of railway and that not many mountains in the surroundings).
The tunnel is exactly est-west so in March 21st and September 21st they invite everyone to go to the eastern side of the tunnel, very near to the village

Why?

Just because at 7.00 the sunlight will cross the whole tunnel and in the opposite side of the tunnel it will be able to see the sun.

It is an unique situation to see a 2,1 km tunnel plenty of sun light.


It requires just a detail: have a sunny day, but this year they had


Valdealgorfa is here:
https://maps.google.es/?ll=40.993243...21136&t=w&z=16
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