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Old February 3rd, 2007, 08:08 AM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berniemacksouthcentr View Post
Today, its the Parish of Our Lady of Immaculate Conception
Karon ba naay pay mga gamit nakuha paghuman sa linog? Just tell me if you understood because our Iloggo friends could understand Cebuano but with a little difference here and there. The is the only church that I know that has the retalbo in the center. I do not know any churches than this one even in Latin America. Does anyone know one in Europe? I know its typical to be in the corner.
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Old February 4th, 2007, 04:12 AM   #102
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17 January 2007

Lapaz Park Iloilo City

Rizal Monument

Park Entrance from Javellana Street

Theater


not necessarily "old" but the recently rebuilt park deserves to be preserved and maintained.
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Old February 5th, 2007, 08:17 AM   #103
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image hosted on flickr


Arroyo Fountain begins to spout again

2007-02-05

AFTER several years of standing idle and waterless, the Arroyo Fountain in front of the old Provincial Capitol building began to come alive again with the structure spouting water again.

With the Metro Iloilo Water District taking the job of rehabilitating the structure for barely a couple of weeks, the Fountain was activated on December 20, 2006 and is now a sight to behold, especially to motorists and pedestrians who pass by it.

Repaired at the cast of P843,700, the fountain operates only at designated hours. The two pumps driving the nozzle and the lights are controlled by digital timers. Gushing water comes out in the morning from 7-8:30, at noon time from 11:30-1:30 and late afternoon from 5:00-8:30.

MIWD said the structure is set to be inaugurated this February with local and national dignitaries expected to grace the occasion.

The Arroyo Fountain was constructed in 1927 at the junction of Iznart and General Luna streets in memory of Senator Jose Ma. Arroyo who authored Republic Act No. 3222 in the Philippine Legislature establishing the Iloilo Metropolitan Waterworks (IMWW) in 1925.

It was built as a project of then Gov. Jose B. Ledesma together with Board Members Mabunay and Engracio Padilla, District Engineer Alejo Aquino and Treasurer R.S. Van Valkeburgh.

Situated diametrically in front of the old Iloilo Provincial Capitol, the fountain is said to be the earmark of the province. It has a very distinct feature that one cannot think of Iloilo every time he sees it.

With the fountain back in harness, the public is encouraged to cooperate in maintaining the structure by refraining from throwing garbage in it.

Source: The Daily Guardian Iloilo 02.02.2007


SSC Iloilo in Fuente Arroyo (courtesy of IAMME)
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Old February 7th, 2007, 05:43 AM   #104
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Business establishments at Muelle Loney & other streets, 1920s

In the 1920s, based on the 1927 Iloilo Telephone Directory and other printed materials at that time, many commercial establishments at the pier and even on the shorter side streets of the city advertised themselves. In Muelle Loney, the leading firms were the Compania General de Tabacos de Filipinas, Lizarraga Hermanos, Koppel Industrial Car & Equipment Co., Pacific Commercial Co., Warner Barnes & Co. Ltd., Smith Bell & Co. Ltd., Sing Joco & Co., and the Visayan General Supply Co. Inc. They were either Spanish, Chinese or European-owned.

Calle Progresso (now De la Rama St.), on the other hand, was the site of the oldest banks in the country -- Banco Las Islas Filipinas and the Hongkong & Shanghai Bank. The other business firms operating in the street were: F.E. Zuellig Inc., Lizares & Co. Inc., De la Rama Steamship Co., Strachan & McMurray, Vacuum Oil Co., Warner Barnes & Co. Ltd., and Wise & Co. Ltd. (Texas Co. P.I. agent).

Other business establishments and agencies that advertised themselves were those found at Ortiz, Arroyo, Solis and Arsenal streets. Those at Ortiz Street were the Asiatic Petroleum Co., Certeza Surveying Co., Iloilo Business Agents Inc., Iloilo Club, Ker & Co., Kuenzle & Streiff Inc., and Nestle & Anglo-Swiss Milk Co. while those at Arroyo Street were the Bio Guan & Co., Chian Sing Co., Kian Chiong Co., V.Y. Suajico & Co., and Woo Sing & Co. which were all Chinese-owned. Only one at Solis Street advertised itself and this was the Asian Lumber while two were at Arsenal Street — Kwong Wah Yuen & Co. and Teal Motor Co. On the other hand, McLeod & Co. Inc. which was engaged in machinery, shipping, and insurance, and the Visayas Printing Co. were situated at Blumentritt Street. The Singer Sewing Machine Co., on its part, was operating at General Hughes Street.

The perimeter around Plaza Libertad was the location of many business establishments. Among them was the Manuel Trading & Supply Co., distributor of Lincoln and Ford cars, as well as Fordson tractors. Then there were the Ayala Distributors, Bachrach Motor Co., Dollar Steamship Line, Centro Catolico de Iloilo, Iloilo Sheet Metal Banks, and Woelti & Habluetzel. The two prominent hotels -- Iloilo Hotel and Plaza Hotel -- were operating here, together with the Plaza Cafe. There were also two firms engaged in transportation found in the area -- the Manzano Garage and the Vidal E.B. Service Garage.

Connected to a point in Plaza Libertad is Calle Rosario. It was here that the famous exclusive club, the Casino Español, was found. Two other transportation firms were operating here, the Oriental Park Stable & Garage and the Park Livery Stable & Garage.

Meanwhile, a number of Chinese-owned establishments were doing business at Aldeguer Street. They were Hong Wo & Co., Kuan Wing & Co., Kwong Sew Wing & Co., La Manzana (owned by Guando & Co.), Tan Boon Kong & Co., and Wong Ahang & Co.

Finally, in Calle Santo Niño (now Guanco Street) can be found Cine Lux, the House of Universal Pictures. It was also where Clarkes Inc., Filma Mercantile Co. Inc., Iloilo Ice Cold & Storage Co., Menzi & Co. Inc., Panay Telephone & Telegraph Co., and Standard Oil Co. were doing business.

As gleaned from the above, there were so many business establishments operating in Iloilo during the 1920s, even in the less prominent streets of the city. These are indications that business opportunities were at their peak during this time when Iloilo was the "Queen City of the South". Many of the commercial firms were owned by foreigners -- Americans and Europeans -- an implication that, indeed, Iloilo at that time was a very attractive investment area in the Philippines.

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Old February 7th, 2007, 05:44 AM   #105
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Mexican influence in West Visayas


Very few West Visayans know the significant influences of Mexico in the region. Mainly, these influences are in religion and economics.

These were so because, the Philippine colony was ruled by Spain thru Nueva España (Mexico) since the beginning up to 1812 when Mexico became independent.

In religion, there are Our Lady of Guadalupe which is the patroness of the Philippines, the third oldest image in the country of Santo Niño in Arevalo, the Churisque architecture of the early churches typical of which is the Tigbauan Church before the recent addition of the second tower.

In iconology, the earliest images were carved following the classical type, followed later by the baroque style – both introduced by the Mexicans.

In economics, the first coins circulated in the colony were minted in Mexico. That's why they were called by West Visayas as "mek".

The Mexicans also introduced maize (corn), pineapple, guavas and avocado in the region. Corn became the second staple food of the West Visayans next to rice. It helped the people during famine and is most suited for cultivation on the hilly terrain abundant in the region.

The natives also found economic use of the fiber of the pineapple leaves (piña). These were woven into cloths. Because of its durability tenderness compared to the native abaca (wild banana) fiber, the piña fiber gained good market in Manila and even in Europe and the United States.

This made the province of Iloilo during the Spanish time the textile center of the whole colony with more than 5,000 looms engaged in weaving industry.

The Spanish galleon Acapulco-Manila trade exposed West Visayan products to world trade. The Spanish galleons used square cement blocks as ballasts and when the galleon trade ceased, these ballasts (piedra china) found their way to West Visayas and used as pathways and door steps for churches as well as for public and private buildings.

Because of the far distance between the Philippines and Spain, most of the lower echelon government personnel were from Mexico who greatly influenced the nationalistic spirit of the natives especially after Mexico itself became independent.

Hence, in the rivalry between the insulares (Spaniards born in Mexico) and the peninsulares (natives of Spain), the West Visayans usually took the side of the former.

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Old February 8th, 2007, 05:22 PM   #106
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Spanish era administration of justice, 1

Interesteing fragments of local historical judicial system...

----------------------------------------------
ANYTHING UNDER THE SUN
By REX SALVILLA

.....

INTERESTING COLONIAL ORDINANCES
During the Spanish time, there were three unique ordinances passed in the pueblos of Iloilo.

The first one was in the pueblo of Barotac Viejo. It was an ordinance for taxes and tributes to all those whose surnamed Tupas.

The Spaniards believed that the Tupases in that town were close relatives of Sultan Tupas of Sugbu (Cebu) to whom they owned so many things.

The second was in the pueblo of Dumangas. In 1855, the Spaniards prohibited the sale of liquor except vino de estanco imported from Spain and sold only by the Spaniards.
The natives under Mateo Dorilag revolted against this wine monopoly because they could not drink tuba – favorite native coconut wine.

In the battle, Dorilag was killed and the Spaniards cut down all his coconut trees.
The third was in the pueblo of Lucena. Fray Fernando Hernandez and Fray Mateo Serapio ordered the natives to speak Hiligaynon only – and not Kinaray-a, under the pain of severe punishment.


Complete text: http://www.panaynews.com.ph/opinion.htm
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Old February 8th, 2007, 08:17 PM   #107
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The Arroyo Fountain looks amazing ! Hopefully the fountain will be maintained in its functional level. Kudos to MIWD !
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Old February 9th, 2007, 01:06 AM   #108
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Iloilo City Warnings or Dangers

This is a great note for our city officials from someone who is deeply concerned with our heritage.

Eroding architectural heritage

This does not apply to tourists, but rather an appeal to Iloilo City's authorities. One of Iloilo City's largest attractions and the source of its old world charm is the city's architectural heritage built mainly during the American colonial era. But the city risks losing these priceless gems if nothing is done to restore them and halt their destruction/demolition (which to me has grown at an alarming rate!). The time to act is now.

by Tijavi

from: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel...City-BR-1.html
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Old February 9th, 2007, 09:00 AM   #109
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A great woman of history (Does she have any statue in Iloilo?)



During the World War many Filipinos fought against the Spaniards, Americans and the Japanese. Under these three governments, our heroes never stop fighting not until the Philippines has its democracy and independence. Nazaria L. Lagos was one of the Filipinos who risk her life for the freedom of our country.

Nazaria L. Lagos has the heart of a mother that is fount of deep, strong and deathless love. She is next to God in the love and care of a child. The life of Nazaria L. Lagos is a story of love, courage and patriotism not only for her family but for her fellow Filipinos and for her country the Philippines. She was born not only to become a mother of her own children but of the many wounded Filipino soldiers, sick civilians and of the sick children during the war.

Nazaria L. Lagos was born on August 28, 1851 in Barrio Burongan (now Jaguimit), Laglag (now the town of Dueñas), Iloilo. Her parents were Don Juan de la Cruz Lagos and Doña Saturnina Labrillaso. Being an only child she was well-cared and brought up in comfort since her parents belonged to a very rich family. They owned a wide hacienda. At her young age, she saw in her parents the wise way of living – work and save. Although she has the privilege of having everything, she was not a spoiled girl. When she was six years old, her mother hired Maestro Gregorio "Oyong" Tingzon as her teacher. She was founded by Maestro "Oyong" to be brilliant. At a very young age, she was a girl of good standing in the community. Among the elite girls of the town, aside from having good looks and strong personality she could speak well in Spanish. She was a surprise to them for she was associating with the Spanish Officials. When she stood she was a commanding figure and when she looked, she was a winning personality. All these, plus her talent made her one of the Greatest Figures during the 1898 Revolution of the Visayas and Mindanao.

When she was 12 years old, she was married to her second cousin Segundo Lagos, a son of a wealthy land owner, Don Bartolome Lagos whose ancestors were the founders of Dueñas and Roman Catholicism in Dueñas. Segundo was the Roman Catholic Chief Sacristan, Adviser of the Priest and later appointed as Municipal President (Mayor) of the town. Nazaria and Segundo Lagos descendants were a true Spanish Blood (Captain Lagos first ancestor of the Lagos who arrived in the Philippines and married a Mestiza Filipina) but deep in their hearts they were true Filipinos.

During the many years of her marriage life, Nazaria tried to meet the intricacies of her home life with patience. Even at a very early age she has good qualities of a wife and a mother. She was equipped with proper knowledge on nursing care and medical care by Dr. Cuadra, a family friend and doctor, who often visited the family and stayed for days in the wide family Hacienda. The Lagos Family is considered as one of the "Familia Illustrada" of the town. This placed Nazaria and Segundo in the good graces of both the Spanish Government and the Church Priests.

Nazaria was appointed President of the first local unit of Red Cross organization in the province of Iloilo by the order of the Military Governor, Don Ricardo Nonet, and strengthened by the recommendation of the parish priest, Padre Lorenzo Suarez.

During the revolution under the general supervision of Gen. Martin Delgado, Nazaria Lagos was chosen as secretary and Segundo (her husband) as the adviser of the Revolutionary Volunteers to go against the Spanish Government. Her house in Barrio Burongan (now Jaguimit) was made as a secret meeting place of the high-ranking officers of the revolution in the whole province of Iloilo. Nazaria and Segundo built a secret Army Hospital in their Hacienda in Jaguimit and which Nazaria was appointed as Chief of the Army Hospital and Manager of the Army Food Supply Depot for the Filipino soldiers. This is for the preparation of the revolutionist for the war against the Spaniards. The building of the hospital came from Nazaria and Segundo's own money. The supplies of the food came from the production of their farm. She gave an all out support for the welfare of the Filipinos. Nazaria Lagos and her family together with their "obreros" began to work secretly in Hacienda Jaguimit. She personally supervised the construction of the hospital made from local materials. They made bamboos as beds, chairs and tables and cabinets for the wounded Filipino soldiers.

The war started. Many Filipino soldiers were sick and wounded, and they were brought to the hospital in Jaguimit. The hospital was not only for the Filipino soldiers but as well as the sick and wounded civilians. Since the hospital is certainly located between the North and South revolutionary groups, supply almost ran out. For such a gigantic tack for a woman to bear, the Red Cross helped her in asking donations like food, clothing and medicine. Her tenants had contributed their time and efforts to help in caring for the wounded soldiers. Her knowledge in herbal medicine played an important role in this extraordinary task during the Revolution. Spending almost all her time, effort and fortune for the brother Filipinos, she even was able to bear the death of her two children when the smallpox epidemic struck the country during the years of the turmoil.

Nazaria Lagos and her two daughters together with the Red Cross members, sew the Philippine flag. In spite of the scarcity of the clothes, sewing needles and threads, they made improvised needles out of umbrella wire and abaca fibers as the threads. The flag was hoisted at 9 o' clock in the morning of June 12, 1899 in the Dueñas town plaza. Nazaria and the people of Dueñas knelled down with tears rolling down their cheeks and prayed for their safety and independence while the National Hymn was played.

Nazaria Lagos reserved a legacy not in wealth but as a model mother, leader and a great woman in history. Unfortunately, she became blind and on January 27, 1947, at the age of 96, silently passed away at Sitio Amuyao, Jaguimit, Dueñas, Iloilo. She had served her country and family with love and devotion. She had all her children educated. Doña Caridad was a business woman and donor of the Jaguimit Barrio School site; Felicita became a nurse and first Pastor of the First Assemblies of God in the whole Philippines in which the church and site was donated by Nazaria Lagos. She also donated a lot in Jaguimit for the Health Center. Pomposa and Filomena were teachers. Pomposa together with Caridad were former students of Colegio de San Jose, Jaro, Iloilo City; Dioscoro became the first elementary school supervisor for the five towns of Iloilo.

Nazaria and Segundo Lagos will long be remembered from generation to generation. The service to their fellowmen is worth dying. And their names will be written in Bold Letters to all Filipinos, patriots, nationalist and lover of democracy.

The legacy of Nazaria L. Lagos still lives. Last September 1998, Ramon P. Lagos Jr. (son of Ramon L Lagos Sr.) and his wife Ruth Joy Suede Lagos together with their children Franklin, Joy, Nazaria (Charie) and Faith were awarded as Model Family or "Huwarang Pamilya" in the whole Philippines at the Malacañang Palace awarded by President Joseph Ejercito Estrada.

Nazaria's love to her children was great but the call of her country was urgent. She said "My country first for the fall of my country means the loss of all including my loved ones and if I and my children should all die, it is our precious gift to our country, for if we fall, our country will rise again – free and happy."

* Based on the book written by Ramon L. Lagos Sr. He is the 6th son of the National Heroine Nazaria L. Lagos, former politician, pharmacist (U.P. Manila – top 9 board passer in the whole Philippines), businessman, philanthropist, former chairman of the Historical Committee in Iloilo and author of almost 20 books.

http://www.thenewstoday.info/2007/02...f.history.html
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:21 PM   #110
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I don't think she has one in Iloilo. A silent-hero of the past.
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Old February 9th, 2007, 03:24 PM   #111
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The Tapar uprising in Oton, Iloilo


The Bisayans, like the rest of the Filipinos, did not take the Spanish colonization of their country sitting down. From the moment the Spaniards settled down permanently in the country in 1565, the natives fought back and continued their resistance in the form of revolts up to the end of the Spanish rule in 1898. The revolts were either caused by personal and religious motives, by the oppressive Spanish-introduced economic as well as religious institutions, and by land problems.

Revolts that had personal motives were led by former barangay datus and babaylans who had lost their prestige and influence in their communities with the coming of the Spaniards. This was so because they were supplanted by leaders chosen by the colonizers and by the Spanish friars who, naturally, preferred subservient local wards. Not only did they yearn to go back to their old ways and their own culture then gradually being eroded by Hispanization and Christianization, but most of all regain the freedom that they formerly enjoyed. The former datus whose rule and subsistence were secured through the annual tributes or gifts from the barangay people now lost their influence and prestige. Of course, some of them who joined the Spaniards in the pacification campaign and the subsequent exploitation of the natives were able to regain their position. They therefore, retained their patronage and were granted exclusive royal privileges of exemption from paying tribute and from rendering polo or forced labor.

As to those uprising with religious motives, they were led by babaylans who lost their influence and power because they were stripped of such by the Catholic evangelization of the country. They were soon superseded by the different waves of Spanish regular clergy who spread out to various parts of the country. The babaylans apostasized and desired to go back to their public acceptance of Catholicism, continued to secretly practice their rituals and beliefs behind the backs of the ever-vigilant Spanish friars. Those practices were, from the start, declared by the Spanish friars as idolatrous and unlawful, and practitioners were severely punished.

Spanish impositions like taxation, forced labor, galleon trade, indulto de comercio, and the various monopolies (tobacco, liquors, betel nut among others) were persistent irritants and were common cause of Filipino revolts. Another major cause of peasant unrest was agrarian in nature ranging from disputed fraudulent land surveys to usurpation and outright land grabbing committed especially by unscrupulous Spanish hacienderos and some religious orders in the country.

In 1663, a native revolt with religious overtones was led by Tapar in Oton, Iloilo. He was a babaylan who was a new convert to Catholicism. He founded a new syncretic religion which was a modified form of Christianity. He proclaimed himself "God Almighty" and went around garbed in a woman's dress. Tapar's syncretic religion appropriated Catholic terminologies and ignored the Spanish priests because Tapar believed that they had their own "popes", "bishops", and "priests", as well as "Jesus Christ", "Holy Ghost" and "Trinity" who could minister to them in their own nativistic ways.

The Spanish curate assigned to the town of Oton tried to persuade the people to go back to Catholicism but he was killed in the process. Tapar's group burned the church and the priest's house, and fled to the mountains. Spanish troops were sent to Oton and by employing hired spies, the Spaniards caught up with the principal leaders who, in the process of fighting back, were killed. Their corpses were carried back to the port of Iloilo, then fastened to bamboo poles in the Halawod (Jalaur) River to be fed on by crocodiles. The woman who was named as the group's "Blessed Virgin Mary" (Maria Santisima) was mercilessly impaled on a bamboo stake and placed strategically at the mouth of the Laglag (now Dueñas) River to be eaten also by crocodiles. By 1664, as claimed by the Spaniards, peace had returned to Oton. (Agoncillo 1979, Zaide 1957)

source: The News Today
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Old February 10th, 2007, 02:09 AM   #112
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Spanish era administration of justice, 2
THE JUDICIARY

AT the bottom of the judicial ladder was the justice of the peace court in the pueblo (town) chaired by the gobernadorcillo (equivalent of the present mayor).

It had jurisdiction over petty criminal cases with penalty of not more than 10 days imprisonment or a fine of not more than five pesos.

Next up the ladder was the Court of First Instance in the alcaldia (province) presided by the alcalde mayor (equivalent of the present governor). It dealt on appeals from the justice of the peace courts and grave criminal cases and civil cases involving big amounts.

The next step above was the collegial Real Audiencia in Manila which entertained appealed cases from the Court of First instance and was presided by the Governor General. This was the highest court in the colony and was created in the Philippines in 1565.

Incidentally, Raymundo Melliza, an Ilonggo lawyer – a graduate of the University of Madrid, was an oidor (justice) of the Real Audiencia.

However, its decisions could still be appealed to the Council of the Indies in Seville, Spain. In turn, the decisions of this Council were still appeallable to the King of Spain – the absolute ruler.

There were also special courts such as the ecclesiastical courts for the religious, army and navy courts for the military, commercial courts for the merchants and juicio de residencia which tried former colonial officials for action done during their incumbencies.

There was also the Department of Prosecution tasked with prosecution of the accused in criminal cases and also to represent the government in civil cases when the latter was a party thereto.

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Old February 10th, 2007, 10:37 AM   #113
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thanks for more updates.
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Old February 10th, 2007, 09:35 PM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spacewagon1 View Post
I don't think she has one in Iloilo. A silent-hero of the past.
nah. we're too engrossed with so many things that we've forgotten people who spare their lives for our freedom. I think it's right time for us to give credit to our local heroes more than anybody else.
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Old February 12th, 2007, 09:22 AM   #115
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Lines Across Time: A traveling exhibit on life in 19th Century Philippines
By Limuel S. Celebria


The latest edition of SMILE, Cebu Pacific Airlines’ in-flight magazine has named Museo Iloilo as one of the country’s Top Ten Museums for its rare
collections of pre-Christian artifacts, Chinese pottery, and religious relics.


DID you know that the four muses depicted at the Arroyo Fountain were originally bare-breasted? Indeed! But at some point in time, probably in the early 60s, some powerful manang deemed the sculpture offensive to Ilonggo sensibilities and drapes of cement were covered over the offending curves. Today, the Arroyo Fountain remains as glorious as it was, the fully-clothed muses notwithstanding.

Extant proof of the Arroyo Fountain in its original glory has remained, however, a large, early portrait of the Iloilo Provincial Capitol with the Arroyo Fountain in front is now part of an exhibit that opens today at the Museo Iloilo. The traveling exhibit, "Lines Across Time," pays tribute to our majestic heritage and depicts our socio-cultural evolution as portrayed by our "built environment," the homes (from bahay kubo to bahay na bato) that our ancestors lived in, the casa mayor (city or municipal hall), and their spatial relationship around the town plaza. The Fundacion Santiago brings the exhibit to Iloilo with support from the University of San Agustin and the Iloilo Cultural and Research Foundation, Inc. (ICRFI), steward foundation of the Museo Iloilo.

Lines Across Time is a three-module presentation, which boasts, of visual information replete with architectural plans and photographs from the Archivo Historico Militar, the Archivo General de Indias, the Servicio Historico Militar, and other Spanish archival institutions. There are also interactive kiosks and a learning kit for multimedia activities that are guaranteed to engage teachers, students, architects, urban planners, and heritage enthusiasts.

Aimed at showing how Philippine life was transformed by the Spanish influenced on our architecture - the exhibit has three parts: House, Infrastructure, and Everyday Life. The first section showcases the bahay na bato, the residence of the elite insulares and peninsulares as well as the bahay kubo of the masa.

The second section deals with the infrastructure the Spanish built to support their colonial administration - ports, railroads, bridges, and other official structures.

The third showcases the fabric of everyday town life as depicted in layouts of town plazas and churches.

Though the traveling exhibit was designed to describe the typical town setting in the Philippines in the 1800s, Ilonggos will easily embrace it as their own. Many of the heritage structures indicated in the display remain standing and fully functional in this part of the country. In brief, the exhibit should instill in the Ilonggo some sense of pride in his own heritage.

For the next three weeks, Ilonggos are encouraged to troop to the Museo Iloilo and get a glimpse of 19th Century Philippines through Lines Across Time, an abundant graphic documentation of the legacy left by Spain's military and civil engineers.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 03:34 AM   #116
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Originally Posted by wecky View Post
nah. we're too engrossed with so many things that we've forgotten people who spare their lives for our freedom. I think it's right time for us to give credit to our local heroes more than anybody else.
I agree though.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 03:35 AM   #117
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17 January 2007

Lapaz Park Iloilo City

Rizal Monument

Park Entrance from Javellana Street

Theater


not necessarily "old" but the recently rebuilt park deserves to be preserved and maintained.
very nice photos, crez.
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Old February 13th, 2007, 12:22 PM   #118
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Karon ba naay pay mga gamit nakuha paghuman sa linog? Just tell me if you understood because our Iloggo friends could understand Cebuano but with a little difference here and there. The is the only church that I know that has the retalbo in the center. I do not know any churches than this one even in Latin America. Does anyone know one in Europe? I know its typical to be in the corner.
The retablo was in the center because the church was in the form of a Greek Cross, where all the arms are equal in length, unlike the Latin cross, where one, the nave, is longer than the others.

St. Peter's Basilica in Rome was originally planned along the Greek Cross plan. The succeeding architects, lengthened one arm - the nave - which obscures the view of the dome from the facade. If Michelangelo's plans were not modified ( which also modified the plans of the previous architect ), Bernini's canopy which is beneath the dome, would have been situated in the middle, just like the retablo of the old Oton church.
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Old February 14th, 2007, 11:41 PM   #119
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Spanish era administration of justice (3)


LAW ENFORCEMENT BODIES

In the towns, there was the cuerpo de cuadrillos -- the local police force. In the national level, there was the guardia civil -- the insular police. Both were the law enforcement arms of the national, provincial and local executives.

PENAL SYSTEM

The penal system consisted of the municipal jails in the towns, provincial jails in the towns, provincial jails in the provinces and national penitentiary in Bilibid Prison, Manila with branches in Cavite, Zamboanga, Marianas (Guam). There were also penal colonies and farms in Palawan, Cotabato, and Zamboanga.

LEGAL PROFESSION

The last component of the administration of justice in the Philippine during the Spanish era was the legal profession. It consisted of the lawyers appointed to the judiciary (juezes) and the prosecution department (fiscal) and the practicing lawyers (abogados) as well as the notaries public who were either lawyers or non-lawyers.

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Old February 16th, 2007, 12:09 AM   #120
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arroyo fountain in its functional state looks really great. It livens up the whole city. Looking at it whilst splurging waters, is like looking at the city and province's economic grandeur. Truly, Arroyo fountain mirrors (and witness to) Iloilo's surging economy.
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